2003 Champagne Moët et Chandon, Dom Pérignon Rosé

2003 Champagne Moët et Chandon, Dom Pérignon Rosé

Rose, Ready, but will keep   Rose | Ready, but will keep | Dom Perignon | Code: 21280 | 2003 | France > Champagne > Rose Champagne | Champagne Blend | Medium-Full Bodied, Brut | 12.0 % alcohol


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Bottle 3 x 75cl




Bottle 3 x 75cl




Magnum 3 x 150cl



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Scores and Reviews







JANCIS - The Dom Pérignon team continue to make a strong statement with their roses. And the 2003 vintage certainly helped them by providing relatively bumptious, full-on ingredients. This wine is a pale tomato red - much deeper than most other pink champagnes - with a distinctly orange tinge thanks to the wine's age.

This wine, designed for drinking with food, is big and almost Grenache-like!!! The finish is dry but along the way there are some strawberry notes and a suggestion of long oak ageing. I keep thinking of Tondonia Rosado (another complex, long-aged pink, though from Rioja)! Not that persistent, this lip-smacking wine is a bit of a cheeky chappie. Almost more of a defiant statement that flies in the face of conventional rosé wisdom than a wine. Very full - definitely for the table rather than a refreshing aperitif style.
Jancis Robinson MW, JancisRobinson.com

OTHER - The 2003 Dom Pérignon Rosé is another wine that has come together quite nicely over the last few months. Given the exuberance and sheer vinosity of the 2000 and the 2002, along with the ripeness of the year, and the heft of the 2003 Blanc, I expected the 2003 Rosé to be a much bigger wine. Instead, it is surprisingly delicate and medium in body. Dried flowers, crushed raspberries and sweet herbs waft from the glass in a Rosé that is all about sensuality. With time in the glass, the richness of the fruit becomes more pronounced, while the tannin from the red grapes is also noticeable. I would prefer to cellar the 2000 and 2002, and drink the 2003 sooner rather than later.
Antonio Galloni, VinousMedia.com

WA - What’s more, the price-quality rapport here is excellent by any Champagne standards, and puts that of many a prestige cuvee to shame. Moet’s 2003 Brut Rose Dom Perignon exhibits both richness and robustness reflecting its torrid vintage, yet manages to stint neither on primary juiciness nor transparency to nuance; nor does it come off as at all heavy. Lightly cooked ripe strawberry and fig infused with rose hip, licorice, Ceylon tea, heliotrope and leather inform a delightfully forward nose and lush, effusively fruity palate.

A tart and seedy edge to the strawberry serves for invigoration; and lobster shell reduction serves for mouthwatering salinity and somehow downright sweet animal savor. There is a hint of tannin, but it is fine-grained and suggestive of structural support.

A long, seductively rich finish manages to harbor not just the immediately aforementioned virtues, but also a sense of transparency to floral and tea-like nuances and to virtually shimmering stoniness. This alluring and distinctive beauty should be worth following for at least the next half dozen years. 2013 – 2019”
94/100 David Schildknecht - Robert Parker’s The Wine Advocate, Nov 2013

The Story

Dom Perignon


Dom Perignon

Dom Pérignon was the 17th century Benedictine monk who has gone down in history as the person who "invented" Champagne. His name was originally registered by Eugène Mercier. He sold the brand name to Moët & Chandon, which used it as the name for its prestige cuvée, which was first released in 1937.

A rigorous selection process in both the vineyard and winery ensures that only the best grapes go into Dom Pérignon champagne. Chardonnay and Pinot Noir are used in roughly equal proportions without one variety dominating the other.

In its youth, Dom Pérignon shows incredibly smooth, creamy fruit with perfect balance and weight. As it ages, it takes on wonderfully toasty aromas and a finesse equalled by very few of the other Grandes Marques.

Since 2014 Dom Pérignon has no longer been using the term oenothèque for its late-release Champagnes, but the word Plenitude. This style represents Dom Pérignon champagne that is left in contact with its lees and does not evolve in a linear fashion, but ages in a series of stages, producing “windows of opportunity, or plenitudes” when the Champagne can be disgorged and released to bring consumers a different expression of the same vintage.

There are three plenitudes in the life of a given vintage: the first plenitude spans between seven to eight years after the vintage, which is when Dom Pérignon Vintage is released, while the second one arrives between 12 and 15 years – which was previously the first oenothèque release, but from now will be branded as P2. The third window comes after around 30 years, when the Champagne has spent more than 20 years on its lees, which will now be termed as P3.


Champagne Blend

Champagne Blend

Which grapes are included in the blend, and their proportion, is one of the key factors determining the style of most Champagnes. Three grapes are used - Pinot Noir, Chardonnay and Pinot Meunier.

26% of vineyards in Champagne are planted with Chardonnay and it performs best on the Côtes des Blancs and on the chalk slopes south of Epernay. It is relatively simple to grow, although it buds early and thus is susceptible to spring frosts. It produces lighter, fresher wines than those from Burgundy and gives finesse, fruit and elegance to the final blend. It is the sole grape in Blancs de Blancs, which are some of the richest long-lived Champagnes produced.

Pinot Noir accounts for nearly 40% of the plantings in Champagne and lies at the heart of most blends - it gives Champagne its body, structure, strength and grip. It is planted across Champagne and particularly so in the southern Aube district.

The final component is Pinot Meunier and this constitutes nearly 35% of the plantings. Its durability and resistance to spring frosts make the Marne Valley, a notorious frost pocket, its natural home. It ripens well in poor years and produces a soft, fruity style of wine that is ideal for blending with the more assertive flavours of Pinot Noir. Producers allege that Pinot Meunier lacks ageing potential, but this does not deter Krug from including around 15% of it in their final blends.


Rose Champagne

Rosé wines are produced by leaving the juice of red grapes to macerate on their skins for a brief time to extract pigments (natural colourings). However, Rosé Champagne is notable in that it is produced by the addition of a small percentage of red wine – usually Pinot Noir from the village of Bouzy – during blending.

Recommended Producers : Billecart Salmon (Elizabeth Salmon Rose), Ruinart

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