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Convalmore, 36-year-old, Speyside, Single Malt Scotch Whisky (58%)

Convalmore, 36-year-old, Speyside, Single Malt Scotch Whisky (58%)

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Scores and Reviews

OTHER - The second 1977 vintage of Convalmore from Diageo's Special Releases, with this 2013 bottling following the 2005. Vibrant amber or faded polished mahogany. Medium beaded and very viscous.

Nose: Mild and profound, opening scented with eucalyptus oil and a trace of leather infusing a soft pillow of marshmallow and creamy toffee. Through this runs a rich vein of clean, tropical fruit sharpness, underscored by soft, crumbly, malty notes with a wisp of smoke. In time, the appetising fruit retreats into a rich, creamy shell. A little water brings up the soft toffee creaminess and a little mint, as the fruity complex becomes fresher.

Body: Lightly oily. Smooth. Palate: Big and oily in texture; gently warming and extremely soft and comforting, like a whisky syrup! The taste is immediately sweet yet, with a note of aniseed, not cloying. Successive waves of pepper, salt and smoke follow, revealing a mouth-drying nature. With water, the texture remains big, thick and tongue-coating; the taste is sweeter, cooler and minty; slightly dusty, too, with hints of shortbread and scented smoke.

Finish: Superbly balanced, with an unusual aftertaste of perfumed smoke. There’s still sweetness but it’s in essence drying, with notable cedar-rich hints of cigar box.

The Producer

Convalmore Distillery, Speyside

Convalmore Distillery, Speyside

Convalmore was founded in 1894 by Convalmore-Glenlivet Distillers. It was one of the Seven Stills of Dufftown, the others were Balvenie, Dufftown, Glendullan, Glenfiddich, Mortlach and Parkmore.

Located just the other side of the tracks from Balvenie, also owned by William Grant & Sons, Convalmore was for many years a significant component of Grants’ blends. Almost all of Convalmore's output was dedicated for blending, notably in Lowrie's and Black and White, and, like Coleburn, the first official bottles were released only after the distillery was mothballed by DCL (now Diageo) in 1985.

To date, the two official bottlings comprise a Rare Malt Edition in 2003 and a 1977 vintage bottled in 2005. There have also been a few independent bottlings. The licence is still maintained by Diageo that reserves the right to market official bottlings. William Grant recently acquired the premises to use them as warehouses.

In its best expression, Convalmore's single malt style  is evocative of honeyed fruity and spices.

The Region

Speyside Whisky

To some Speyside represents the jewel in whisky’s crown. Speyside is the home of legal whisky production and it’s best known examples. Around the world Glenlivet, Macallan, Glenfiddich, Glenrothes and Glenfarclas typify all that whisky, at it’s best has to offer. At it’s heart running from the Monadhliath mountains north to the sea, is the River Spey. It is the fastest flowing river in Britain, and also well known for its salmon fishing.

Speyside is the principal whisky-producing region: Speyside has within it some forty-six operating distilleries - over half the total number in the entire Scotland.

Speysides are essentially sweet whiskies. They have little peaty character They are typically highly perfumed, feminine and elegant.

The classical nature of Speyside’s malts means that a number of the finest malts are used almost exclusively for blending. It is the top Speysider’s that give good blends their ‘Top Dressing’. 

Malts such as Mortlach, Glen Elgin, Strathmill and Benrinnes are rarely found as distillery bottlings, however when individual casks are tracked down by independent bottlers such as our Own Selection Single Malt Whiskies the resultant whisky can be quite wonderful.

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