Red, For laying down

2010 Ch. Larcis Ducasse, St Emilion

2010 Ch. Larcis Ducasse, St Emilion

Red | For laying down | Ch. Larcis Ducasse | Code: 7709 | 2010 | France > Bordeaux > St-Emilion | Merlot | Medium-Full Bodied, Dry | 14.5 % alcohol

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Bottle 6 x 75cl1cs

£500.00
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Scores and Reviews

BBR

16.5/20

JANCIS

16.5/20

PARKER

98+/100

WS

92-95/100

JANCIS - Dark, vibrant crimson. Mid ripeness level. Sweet start and real vibrancy on the palate. Very polished in a modern but not exaggerated way. Quite racy on the finish.
Jancis Robinson MW- jancis robinson.com, April 2011

PARKER - The wine boasts 14.6% natural alcohol and is a final blend of roughly three-fourths Merlot and the rest Cabernet Franc, cropped at a ridiculously low 19 hectoliters per hectare. Notes of licorice, garrigue, incense, smoked meats, espresso, creme de cassis and blackberry liqueur jump from the glass of this unbelievably intense wine. Remarkably full, with compelling freshness and precision, this is a fabulous effort in 2010. It will probably close down over the next several years, and not re-emerge for at least a decade, something that often happens with the bigger, richer, more muscular St.-Emilions from the limestone hillsides and plateaux. This is one of the superstars of the vintage and a profound wine. Drink it between 2020 and 2045. By any standard of measure, this is the second greatest wine I have ever tasted from Larcis Ducasse, eclipsed only by the perfect 2005. Winemaker Nicolas Thienpont, with Stephane Derenoncourt in the background, have hit pay dirt with this 2010 from Larcis-Ducasse’s vineyard of 28 or so acres of the famous Cote Pavie’s decomposed limestone.
98 Robert Parker- Wine Advocate- Feb 2013

An excellent effort, stylistically, the 2010 comes as close to the 2005 as one will find. The wine was made from remarkably low yields of 19 hectoliters per hectare and the final blend was approximately 75% Merlot and 25% Cabernet Franc. The late harvest (it finished during the third week of October) was managed impeccably by the dynamic duo of Nicolas Thienpont and Stephane Derenoncourt. This phenomenal terroir, situated with a south/southeast exposition on the limestone soils of the Cote Pavie, has produced a wine with great individuality. Its dense purple color is followed by notes of black currants, sweet cherries, garrigue, licorice and incense. Already complex, it reveals formidably endowed, full-bodied flavors, a skyscraper-like texture, marvelous depth, moderately high tannins and excellent precision as well as freshness (which gives the wine that 2005-like personality). This 2010 will require 4-5 years of cellaring and should age effortlessly for 20-25 years thereafter.
95-97 Robert Parker- Wine Advocate- May 2011

WS - A nice winey core of crushed red and black currant fruit is laced with ample anise and graphite notes. Stretching out nicely already on the finish, with fresh acidity.
James Molesworth – The Wine Spectator – Top Scoring Bordeaux 2010 – 31 Mar 2011

The Producer

Ch. Larcis Ducasse

Ch. Larcis Ducasse

Traditionally Ch. Larcis Ducasse, a St Emilion Grand Cru Classé, was regarded as a property with exceptional terrior but a constant underperformer. This has changed, mainly thanks to the talents of a new winemaking team headed up by Nicolas Thienpont (of Ch. Pavie Macquin repute) and Stephane Derenoncourt (the mercurial 'flying wine consultant') who have managed to unlock the potential of this sleeping giant.

The estate is located on one of Bordeaux's finest strips of terroir - the Cote Pavie in St Emilion. Here, this 25-acre property abuts the 1er Grand Cru Classé Ch. Pavie estate. The vines are planted on an eclectic range of soils - alluvial sand deposits, clay, chalk and limestone. The vines, as one would expect for that part of the world, are predominately Merlot (some 75%) Cabernet Franc and Cabernet Sauvignon.

The new winemaking team arrived in 2002 and since then, the wines have gone from strength to strength. Look out especially for the 2005 Ch. Larcis Ducasse (98/100 Parker), 2006 Ch. Larcis Ducasse (91-94 Parker) and 2007 Ch. Larcis Ducasse (92-94 Parker), as these are the manifestation of all the hard work undertaken at the château over recent years.

The Grape

Merlot

Merlot

The most widely planted grape in Bordeaux and a grape that has been on a relentless expansion drive throughout the world in the last decade. Merlot is adaptable to most soils and is relatively simple to cultivate. It is a vigorous naturally high yielding grape that requires savage pruning - over-cropped Merlot-based wines are dilute and bland. It is also vital to pick at optimum ripeness as Merlot can quickly lose its varietal characteristics if harvested overripe.

In St.Emilion and Pomerol it withstands the moist clay rich soils far better than Cabernet grapes, and at it best produces opulently rich, plummy clarets with succulent fruitcake-like nuances. Le Pin, Pétrus and Clinet are examples of hedonistically rich Merlot wines at their very best. It also plays a key supporting role in filling out the middle palate of the Cabernet-dominated wines of the Médoc and Graves.

Merlot is now grown in virtually all wine growing countries and is particularly successful in California, Chile and Northern Italy.

The Region

St-Emilion

St-Emilion

St Emilion is one of Bordeaux's largest producing appellations, producing more wine than Listrac, Moulis, St Estèphe, Pauillac, St Julien and Margaux put together. St Emilion has been producing wine for longer than the Médoc but its lack of accessibility to Bordeaux's port and market-restricted exports to mainland Europe meant the region initially did not enjoy the commercial success that funded the great châteaux of the Left Bank. 

St Emilion itself is the prettiest of Bordeaux's wine towns, perched on top of the steep limestone slopes upon which many of the region's finest vineyards are situated. However, more than half of the appellation's vineyards lie on the plain between the town and the Dordogne River on sandy, alluvial soils with a sprinkling of gravel. 

Further diversity is added by a small, complex gravel bed to the north-east of the region on the border with Pomerol.  Atypically for St Emilion, this allows Cabernet Franc and, to a lesser extent, Cabernet Sauvignon to prosper and defines the personality of the great wines such as Ch. Cheval Blanc.  

In the early 1990s there was an explosion of experimentation and evolution, leading to the rise of the garagistes, producers of deeply-concentrated wines made in very small quantities and offered at high prices.  The appellation is also surrounded by four satellite appellations, Montagne, Lussac, Puisseguin and St. Georges, which enjoy a family similarity but not the complexity of the best wines.

St Emilion was first officially classified in 1954, and is the most meritocratic classification system in Bordeaux, as it is regularly amended. The most recent revision of the classification was in 2012

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