Inchgower, 14-year-old, Speyside, Single Malt Scotch Whisky (43%)

Inchgower, 14-year-old, Speyside, Single Malt Scotch Whisky (43%)

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Scores and Reviews

OTHER - Nose
Light and shy to start with. A bit sharp. Lemon zest. Then moves to sweet, delicate fruit. Lemon meringue pie. A whiff of sea-breeze.
Palate
Grassy, dessert-like with a contrasting note of pleasant sourness. Chewy. Spices burst out quite energetically. Ginger.
Finish
Long-lasting. Spicy dryness.
Comment
A bit restrained initially, then unveils a charming vibrant sweetness. Well-balanced.

Martine Nouet - Whisky Magazine Issue 27 Nose
Light and very fresh, almost a sea breeze nose. With water, a delicious perfume: cut grass, daffodil, green apple. Delicate with a whisper (Wispa?) of chocolate.
Palate
Delicate with jasmine, tangerine and a lightly liquorous texture. Slightly acidic.
Finish
Tart and clean. A little short.
Comment
The freshest malt you could wish for. Perfume and appetising.

Dave Broom - Whisky Magazine Issue 27

The Story

Inchgower Distillery, Speyside

Producer

Inchgower Distillery, Speyside

Inchgower distillery was built in 1871 to replace Tochineal distillery but it was liquidated in 1903. Buckie Council purchased the concern in 1936 and ownership was transferred to Arthur Bell & Sons Ltd in 1938 (now part of Diageo).

The distillery is classified as Speyside, yet it is a long way from the region on the Moray Firth, near the fishing port of Buckie. Stylistically it evokes little of the elegant, fragrant Speyside character, it is rather more like a coastal malt. The single malt displays a salty, assertive flavour uncharacteristic of the region. The body is smooth, sweet and malty and the finish dry, delivering the final saltiness.

Just 1% of the production is sold as single malt, the remaining part being used in the Bell's (mainly), and Johnnie Walker.

Region

Speyside Whisky

To some Speyside represents the jewel in whisky’s crown. Speyside is the home of legal whisky production and it’s best known examples. Around the world Glenlivet, Macallan, Glenfiddich, Glenrothes and Glenfarclas typify all that whisky, at it’s best has to offer. At it’s heart running from the Monadhliath mountains north to the sea, is the River Spey. It is the fastest flowing river in Britain, and also well known for its salmon fishing.

Speyside is the principal whisky-producing region: Speyside has within it some forty-six operating distilleries - over half the total number in the entire Scotland.

Speysides are essentially sweet whiskies. They have little peaty character They are typically highly perfumed, feminine and elegant.

The classical nature of Speyside’s malts means that a number of the finest malts are used almost exclusively for blending. It is the top Speysider’s that give good blends their ‘Top Dressing’. 

Malts such as Mortlach, Glen Elgin, Strathmill and Benrinnes are rarely found as distillery bottlings, however when individual casks are tracked down by independent bottlers such as our Own Selection Single Malt Whiskies the resultant whisky can be quite wonderful.

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