Corton-Charlemagne

Two specific vineyards, En Charlemagne and Le Charlemagne, make up half of this appellation, while white grapes grown in seven others may also be sold as Corton-Charlemagne. As a result there can be a wide divergence in style between a south-facing location such as Pougets, which needs picking at the start of the harvest, and the western slopes in Pernand-Vergelesses which might be picked weeks later.

Learn more about Corton-Charlemagne

There are two specific Charlemagne vineyards, En Charlemagne and Le Charlemagne, making up half the Corton-Charlemagne appellation, while white grapes grown in seven other vineyards (see list below) may also be sold as Corton-Charlemagne. As a result there can be a wide divergence in style between a south-facing location such as Pougets, which needs picking right at the start of the harvest, and the western slopes in Pernand-Vergelesses which might be picked several weeks later. The underlying similarity though comes from the minerality of the soil.

En Charlemagne lies at the border with Aloxe-Corton. The hillside faces west and fine, racy white wines can be made, but the Grand Cru appellation has been extended right up to the village of Pernand itself, by which time the exposition is north-west and the valley has become noticeably more enclosed. The final sector was only promoted in 1966, and probably should not have been.

Le Charlemagne is the absolute heartland of the appellation, facing south-west, thus avoiding the risk of over-ripeness which can afflict the vines exposed due south. If I had Corton-Charlemagne vines here I would be tempted to let the world know by labelling the wine as Corton-Charlemagne, Le Charlemagne.

Two producers to my knowledge also have some Pinot Noir planted here – Follin-Arbelet and Bonneau du Martray. Both make attractive wines but neither, to my mind, justifies Grand Cru status for red wine, lacking the extra dimensions of flavour one hopes for at the highest level. This is not the producers’ fault, but a reflection of the terroir.

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Louis Jadot, Chardonnay, Dry, Ready, but will improve, White, 13.5 % alc.

Bottle £97.50

Sylvain Loichet, Chardonnay, Dry, Ready, but will improve, White, 13.5 % alc.

Bottle £99.50

Sylvain Loichet, Chardonnay, Dry, Ready, but will improve, White, 13.5 % alc.

Bottle £99.50

Sylvain Loichet, Chardonnay, Dry, For laying down, White, 13.5 % alc.

Bottle £110.00

Case price (6) £518.40

Case saving £141.60

Bottle 6 x 75cl

10cs

£419.70

Domaine de Montille, Chardonnay, Dry, Ready, but will improve, White, 12.5 % alc.

Bottle £110.00

Case price (6) £492.48

Case saving £167.52

Magnum £235.00

Jeroboam £495.00

Jeroboam 1 x 300cl

1cs

£404.30

Sylvain Loichet, Chardonnay, Dry, For laying down, White, 13.0 % alc.

Bottle £110.00

Case price (12) £1,001.52

Case saving £318.48

Bottle 12 x 75cl

23cs

£810.00

Domaine de Montille, Chardonnay, Dry, For laying down, White, 13.0 % alc.

Magnum £270.00

Case price (3) £586.80

Case saving £223.20

Magnum 3 x 150cl

1cs

£476.70

Domaine de Montille, Chardonnay, Dry, Ready, but will improve, White, 12.5 % alc.

Jeroboam £465.00

Bouchard Pere et Fils, Chardonnay, Dry, Ready, but will improve, White, 13.5 % alc.

D. Magnum £495.00

D. Magnum 1 x 300cl

1cs

£390.00

Bouchard Pere et Fils, Chardonnay, Dry, Ready, but will improve, White, 14.0 % alc.

D. Magnum £500.00

D. Magnum 1 x 300cl

2cs

£320.00

Showing 1-10 out of 23 items