Willi Bründlmayer, Brut, Langenlois, Austria

Willi Bründlmayer, Brut, Langenlois, Austria

Product: 10001298460
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Willi Bründlmayer, Brut, Langenlois, Austria

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Willi Brundlmayer

Willi Brundlmayer

Willi Bründlmayer is widely recognised as one of Austria's most gifted winemakers. He is best known for his Rieslings and Grüner Veltliners, although he also makes very high quality Chardonnays.

He has 57 hectares of vineyards, superbly sited high up on slopes around the wine town of Langenlois. His best site is the Heiligenstein vineyard where the rocky granite/slate soils produce Rieslings of astonishing mineral intensity, which age beautifully.

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Niederosterreich

Niederosterreich

Lower Austria (Nieder- Österreich) is one of the four broader regions in the Austrian wine appellation system- the others being Burgenland, Steierland and Bergland Österreich (in western Austria). A significant proportion of Austria’s wine output comes from the Lower Austria region which lies on the fertile Danube plain in the north east part of the country.

Lower Austria encompasses the sub-regions of Carnuntum, Donauland, Taisental, Thermenregion, the prolific Weinviertel and the qualitative significant Kamptal, Kremstal and Wachau.

Weinviertel

Weinviertel (aka wine quarter) is Austria’s most productive and also largest wine region, with over 17,000ha of vineyards. The Weinviertel extends from the Danube in the south to the Czech border in the north, and from the Manhartsberg in the west to the Slovak border in the east.

This is the stronghold of the fruity, spicy, dry Grüner Veltliner grape. The Müller-Thurgau and Welschriesling grapes are also cultivated, typically used for everyday, mass-produced wines. Welschriesling and Grüner Veltliner are also the basis for basis for Vienna’s well-known sparkling wines.

Thermenregion

Created in 1985, the Thermenregion´s 2, 500 hectares of vineyards are situated south of Vienna, at the edge of the Wienerwald (Vienna Woods) near the town of Baden.

The region has a 2,000 years viticultureal heritage, introduced by Roman legionnaires stationed in Carnuntum who “imported” vines and viticultural knowledge from their home countries. The Thermenregion takes its name from the hot, sulphuric thermal springs of the Roman town of Aquae – which is Baden today.

This area is home to rare white grape varieties seldom found elsewhere – Zierfandler and Rotgipfler, supplemented by other Austrian varieties such as Blauer Portugieser, and the Pinot Noir relatives  St. Laurent and Zweigelt.

Wines from the Thermenregion are soft, approachable, ripe and fruity, a fact which reflects the growing conditions and the terroir in the region: Vines here benefit from the Pannonian climate, with its hot summers and dry autumns, as well as the stony, alluvial soil which assist in warming and draining the vineyards.

 

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Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir is probably the most frustrating, and at times infuriating, wine grape in the world. However when it is successful, it can produce some of the most sublime wines known to man. This thin-skinned grape which grows in small, tight bunches performs well on well-drained, deepish limestone based subsoils as are found on Burgundy's Côte d'Or.

Pinot Noir is more susceptible than other varieties to over cropping - concentration and varietal character disappear rapidly if yields are excessive and yields as little as 25hl/ha are the norm for some climats of the Côte d`Or.

Because of the thinness of the skins, Pinot Noir wines are lighter in colour, body and tannins. However the best wines have grip, complexity and an intensity of fruit seldom found in wine from other grapes. Young Pinot Noir can smell almost sweet, redolent with freshly crushed raspberries, cherries and redcurrants. When mature, the best wines develop a sensuous, silky mouth feel with the fruit flavours deepening and gamey "sous-bois" nuances emerging.

The best examples are still found in Burgundy, although Pinot Noir`s key role in Champagne should not be forgotten. It is grown throughout the world with notable success in the Carneros and Russian River Valley districts of California, and the Martinborough and Central Otago regions of New Zealand.

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