2008 Clos de Tart Monopole, Grand Cru, Domaine de Clos de Tart

2008 Clos de Tart Monopole, Grand Cru, Domaine de Clos de Tart

Product: 20088036601
2008 Clos de Tart Monopole, Grand Cru, Domaine de Clos de Tart

Description

Mild but not invisible wood frames very ripe yet cool and airy dark fruit aromas that speak of earth, violets, underbrush and a hint of menthol that leads to reserved, intense and tautly muscular broad-shouldered flavors that are textured, naturally sweet, sappy and concentrated while being supported by a notably firm but not aggressive tannic spine and excellent length on the balanced and palate staining finish. This should require between 15 to 20 years to arrive at its apogee as it's noticeably more structured but unlike some less successful '08s, the phenolics here are quite ripe as the low yields and late picking date are clearly in evidence. This resembles the great 2001 more than a little yet there is even more overall depth of material. In short, this should be truly great in time.
Allen Meadows - burghound.com - Jan 2011

wine at a glance

Delivery and quality guarantee

Buying options

Available by the case In Bond. Pricing excludes duty and VAT, which must be paid separately before delivery. Find out more.
You can place a bid for this wine on BBX

Critics reviews

Burghound96/100
Wine Advocate94+/100
Burghound96/100
Mild but not invisible wood frames very ripe yet cool and airy dark fruit aromas that speak of earth, violets, underbrush and a hint of menthol that leads to reserved, intense and tautly muscular broad-shouldered flavors that are textured, naturally sweet, sappy and concentrated while being supported by a notably firm but not aggressive tannic spine and excellent length on the balanced and palate staining finish. This should require between 15 to 20 years to arrive at its apogee as it's noticeably more structured but unlike some less successful '08s, the phenolics here are quite ripe as the low yields and late picking date are clearly in evidence. This resembles the great 2001 more than a little yet there is even more overall depth of material. In short, this should be truly great in time.
Allen Meadows - burghound.com - Jan 2011 Read more
Wine Advocate94+/100
The 2008 Clos de Tart is all class and elegance. It boasts fabulous inner perfume and endless layers of fruit. The nuance, purity and sheer breed are breathtaking. The 2008 shut down quickly in the glass, but not before leaving a lasting impression. The tannins possess incredible elegance, but that may not be fully apparent for a number of years. This is a gorgeous wine in every way. Anticipated maturity: 2023-2043.
Antonio Galloni - 02/05/2011 Read more

About this WINE

Domaine Clos de Tart

Domaine Clos de Tart

Located in Morey-St Denis, Clos de Tart is the largest of Burgundy’s five Grand Cru monopole vineyards. The vineyard dates to at least 1141 and has had just four owners in that time. Today, it is part of François Pinault’s Artémis Domaines, alongside Ch. Latour, Domaine d’Eugénie and more.

The largest of Burgundy’s five Grand Cru monopole vineyards, Clos de Tart occupies some of the greatest terroir in Morey-St Denis. The vineyard dates to at least 1141, when it was purchased by the Cistercian nuns of Notre Dame de Tart. There have been just four owners in that time, and today it is part of François Pinault’s Artémis Domaines, alongside Ch. Latour, Domaine d’Eugénie, Eisele Vineyard and more.

The 7.52-hectare clos is situated at the south end of Morey-St Denis, bordering Bonnes Mares to the south and Clos des Lambrays in the north. The vineyard has been divided into 13 plots.

The cellars have seen considerable renovation in recent years, with a new vat room inaugurated in time for the 2019 vintage. Director and winemaker Alessandro Noli now works with 15 wooden vats of varying sizes (20 hectolitres to 40 hectolitres) to enable plot-by-plot vinification

Clos de Tart has since 2015 been farmed organically, with organic certification as of the ’18 vintage. Biodynamic practices were adopted in ’16, with certification from the ’19 vintage. The estate maintains a vine nursery in Morey-St Denis.

Find out more
Morey-Saint-Denis

Morey-Saint-Denis

Morey is sometimes ignored between its two famous neighbours, Chambolle-Musigny and Gevrey-Chambertin, but its wines are of equal class, combining elegance and structure. Morey-St Denis, being that little bit less famous, can often provide excellent value.

The four main Grand Cru vineyards continue in a line from those of Gevrey-Chambertin, with Clos St Denis and Clos de la Roche the most widely available. Clos des Lambrays (almost) and Clos de Tart (entirely) are monopolies of the domains which bear the same names.

Domaine Dujac and Domaine Ponsot also make rare white wines in Morey-St Denis.

  • 64 hectares of village Morey-St Denis
  • 33 hectares of Premier Cru vineyards (20 in all). Best vineyards include Les Charmes, Les Millandes, Clos de la Bussière, Les Monts Luisants
  • 40 hectares of Grand Cru vineyard. Clos de Tart, Clos des Lambrays, Clos de la Roche, Clos St Denis and a tiny part of Bonnes Mares
  • Recommended Producers: Dujac, Ponsot, Clos de Tart, Domaine des Lambrays

Find out more
Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir is probably the most frustrating, and at times infuriating, wine grape in the world. However when it is successful, it can produce some of the most sublime wines known to man. This thin-skinned grape which grows in small, tight bunches performs well on well-drained, deepish limestone based subsoils as are found on Burgundy's Côte d'Or.

Pinot Noir is more susceptible than other varieties to over cropping - concentration and varietal character disappear rapidly if yields are excessive and yields as little as 25hl/ha are the norm for some climats of the Côte d`Or.

Because of the thinness of the skins, Pinot Noir wines are lighter in colour, body and tannins. However the best wines have grip, complexity and an intensity of fruit seldom found in wine from other grapes. Young Pinot Noir can smell almost sweet, redolent with freshly crushed raspberries, cherries and redcurrants. When mature, the best wines develop a sensuous, silky mouth feel with the fruit flavours deepening and gamey "sous-bois" nuances emerging.

The best examples are still found in Burgundy, although Pinot Noir`s key role in Champagne should not be forgotten. It is grown throughout the world with notable success in the Carneros and Russian River Valley districts of California, and the Martinborough and Central Otago regions of New Zealand.

Find out more