2009 Champagne Moët & Chandon, Dom Pérignon

2009 Champagne Moët & Chandon, Dom Pérignon

Product: 20098000200
Prices start from £620.00 per case Buying options
2009 Champagne Moët & Chandon, Dom Pérignon

Description

Stylish and seductive from the outset, already open and expressive with delicate ripe stone fruit, floral touches and minerality but also graceful, pure and lifted. Suave and glossy on the attack with very fine mousse, and a fine-textured mid-palate that hints at the warmth of the vintage underpinned by freshness. Beautifully judged, with hints of honey leading to a polished finish and a touch of crisp grapefruit…simply delicious with huge appeal now but not at the expense of balance. Complete and harmonious with an irresistible vibrancy and energy.  Drink 2017-2035.
Adrian Brice, Fine Wine Buyer
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6 x 75cl bottle
BBX marketplace BBX 4 cases £620.00
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3 x 150cl magnum
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About this WINE

Dom Perignon

Dom Perignon

Dom Pérignon was the 17th century Benedictine monk who has gone down in history as the person who "invented" Champagne. His name was originally registered by Eugène Mercier. He sold the brand name to Moët & Chandon, which used it as the name for its prestige cuvée, which was first released in 1937.

A rigorous selection process in both the vineyard and winery ensures that only the best grapes go into Dom Pérignon champagne. Chardonnay and Pinot Noir are used in roughly equal proportions without one variety dominating the other.

In its youth, Dom Pérignon shows incredibly smooth, creamy fruit with perfect balance and weight. As it ages, it takes on wonderfully toasty aromas and a finesse equalled by very few of the other Grandes Marques.

Since 2014 Dom Pérignon has no longer been using the term oenothèque for its late-release Champagnes, but the word Plenitude. This style represents Dom Pérignon champagne that is left in contact with its lees and does not evolve in a linear fashion, but ages in a series of stages, producing “windows of opportunity, or plenitudes” when the Champagne can be disgorged and released to bring consumers a different expression of the same vintage.

There are three plenitudes in the life of a given vintage: the first plenitude spans between seven to eight years after the vintage, which is when Dom Pérignon Vintage is released, while the second one arrives between 12 and 15 years – which was previously the first oenothèque release, but from now will be branded as P2. The third window comes after around 30 years, when the Champagne has spent more than 20 years on its lees, which will now be termed as P3.

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Brut Champagne

Brut Champagne

Brut denotes a dry style of Champagne (less than 15 grams per litre). Most Champagne is non-vintage, produced from a blend from different years. The non-vintage blend is always based predominately on wines made from the current harvest, enriched with aged wines (their proportion and age varies by brand) from earlier harvests, which impart an additional level of complexity to the end wine. Champagnes from a single vintage are labelled with the year reference and with the description Millésimé.

Non-vintage Champagnes can improve with short-term ageing (typically two to three years), while vintages can develop over much longer periods (five to 30 years). The most exquisite and often top-priced expression of a house’s style is referred to as Prestige Cuvée. Famous examples include Louis Roederer's Cristal, Moët & Chandon's Dom Pérignon, and Pol Roger's Cuvée Sir Winston Churchill.

Recommended Producers : Krug, Billecart Salmon, Pol Roger, Bollinger, Salon, Gosset, Pierre Péters, Ruinart


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Champagne Blend

Champagne Blend

Which grapes are included in the blend, and their proportion, is one of the key factors determining the style of most Champagnes. Three grapes are used - Pinot Noir, Chardonnay and Pinot Meunier.

26% of vineyards in Champagne are planted with Chardonnay and it performs best on the Côtes des Blancs and on the chalk slopes south of Epernay. It is relatively simple to grow, although it buds early and thus is susceptible to spring frosts. It produces lighter, fresher wines than those from Burgundy and gives finesse, fruit and elegance to the final blend. It is the sole grape in Blancs de Blancs, which are some of the richest long-lived Champagnes produced.

Pinot Noir accounts for nearly 40% of the plantings in Champagne and lies at the heart of most blends - it gives Champagne its body, structure, strength and grip. It is planted across Champagne and particularly so in the southern Aube district.

The final component is Pinot Meunier and this constitutes nearly 35% of the plantings. Its durability and resistance to spring frosts make the Marne Valley, a notorious frost pocket, its natural home. It ripens well in poor years and produces a soft, fruity style of wine that is ideal for blending with the more assertive flavours of Pinot Noir. Producers allege that Pinot Meunier lacks ageing potential, but this does not deter Krug from including around 15% of it in their final blends.


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Reviews

Customer reviews

The Wine Advocate93+/100
Antonio Galloni
Jancis18+/20
Suckling97/100
Decanter96/100

Critic reviews

The Wine Advocate93+/100
The 2009 Dom Prignon is already drinking well, exhibiting expressive aromas of ripe apple, peach, Meyer lemon, marzipan and dried white flowers that are framed by the classic nutty, autolytic notes that so often define this cuve. On the palate, the wine is medium to full-bodied, rich and fleshy, with a broad attack, a brisk and refined mousse, appreciable dry extract and a notably saline finish. While this is a comparatively ample, gourmand vintage of Dom Prignon, there's sufficient concentration and structural tensionwhich has become more apparent with a bit of bottle ageto suggest that this may be surprisingly long lived.
William Kelley - 31/01/2019 Read more
Antonio Galloni
The 2009 Dom Pérignon is a gorgeous, totally seductive Champagne that will drink well right out of the gate. Medium in body and unusually open-knit at this stage, the 2009 is one of the most accessible young Dom Pérignons I can remember tasting. It is an excellent choice to drink while waiting for the release of the stellar 2008 and some recent vintages that remain very young, including the 2006. Despite the warm, ripe personality of the 2009 Dom Pérignon is quite gracious, but there is plenty of depth underpinning the fruit. With each successive tasting, the 2009 seems to have gained more power and breadth, especially on the finish. Above all else, the 2009 is decidedly restrained for a warm, radiant vintage. It is not as overtly flamboyant as the 2002 nor as phenolically intense as years like 2003 and 2006. Instead, the 2009 is a beautifully balanced Champagne, with all of its elements in the right place. Tasted three times. Drink 2017-2049.
Antonio Galloni - Vinous Read more
Jancis18+/20
Just being released. Very pale, very youthful nose. Lots of zest and freshness. Introvert and tight. But approachable in terms of texture. The flavour is not fully formed yet but it’s already a pleasure to drink from the point of view of balance, presumably thanks to the relatively low acidity. Light hint of bitterness on the end. Length. Palate-enrobing! Lovely texture.
Jancis Robinson MW Read more
Suckling97/100
This is a DP that shows the ripeness of the 2009 vintage yet remains full of energy. Gorgeous aromas of cream, apple, mango, honeysuckle, and chalk follow through to a full body and super fine, tight texture. Dense and agile. Vinous. It’s like a top grand cru white Burgundy. Think Batard-Montrachet. More depth than the 2006. Drink now.
James Suckling Read more
Decanter96/100
Unbroken sun through August and early September helped to shape an idyllic harvest, on 12th September. Superb maturity of fruit in flawless health has produced a wine with wafting scents of both fresh and confit of spiced lemon and wild cherry. Despite the heat, the wine has freshness, vitality and length. Still a youngster, this will grow greatly by 2019. A more stylish son of the '03, and cousin of the slender and charming '06. Disgorged June 2016. Drinking Window 2019-2027.
Michael Edwards - Decanter Read more