2010 Château Pichon Longueville Comtesse de Lalande, Pauillac, Bordeaux

2010 Château Pichon Longueville Comtesse de Lalande, Pauillac, Bordeaux

Product: 20108009157
Prices start from £1,750.00 per case Buying options
2010 Château Pichon Longueville Comtesse de Lalande, Pauillac, Bordeaux

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Available by the case In Bond. Pricing excludes duty and VAT, which must be paid separately before delivery. Storage charges apply.
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12 x 75cl bottle
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Description

Oh, Pichon-Lalande, where have you been for so long? You've not called or even texted. It doesn't matter though because your return is so triumphant. I jest a little of course, but it used to be the highlight of any Bordeaux wine tasting trip, with curves and a round, seductive edge to it - hips if you like! The unusually large dollop of lovely Merlot had something to do with that of course, but for a long time over recent years it's just been a little mean; a tad bony almost.

This year, however, it's a true marvel and has all the components to become a really magical wine to compete alongside, and (I'd imagine) eclipse, some of its former superstars, like the 1996 and 1982. Silky, creamy and lush, it has a killer body and a spectacular finish. We know it's going to be expensive but this year it will be really worth it, as it’s going to be one of the stars of the vintage. Welcome home.
Simon Staples, Fine Wine Director

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Critics reviews

Wine Advocate95+/100
The 2010 Pichon Lalande is performing extremely well and at the top of the range I predicted several years ago. A final blend dominated much more by Cabernet Sauvignon than usual (66% Cabernet Sauvignon, 24% Merlot, 7% Cabernet Franc and the rest Petit Verdot), the wine is a tighter, more tannic and structured version of this famed Pauillac, which often tends to have more of a St-Julien-like personality than most Pauillacs. Structured, backward and tannic, yet showing a fat mid-palate that is more savory, broader and more expansive than I remember from barrel, this wine is somewhat reminiscent of the 1986, given the Cabernet Sauvignon domination of the blend. Full-bodied, impressively endowed, and less sexy and velvety than normal, this is a somewhat different style of Pichon Lalande than most readers have been used to. Whether you like it more or less will depend on your point of view, but this wine, unlike most Pichon Lalandes, needs a good 5-7 years of cellaring and should keep for 30+ years.
Robert M. Parker, Jr. - 28/02/2013 Read more
Jancis Robinson MW17/20
Tasted open 7 Apr: Very, very deep crimson. Savoury yet rich – a most attractive mix! Just a little raw; is there much Petit Verdot in this? (No, just 3%, and 7% Cabernet Franc.) Very drying tannins. Not sure it’s quite a dense as it needs to be for the tannin content. Inky. The gap between grand vin and second wine seems unexpectedly narrow here this year. Perhaps this was just not a good day for the grand vin? I will taste it blind tomorrow…

Tasted blind 8 Apr: Dark, intense crimson. Very rich and supple. Round and flattering. Mid weight and nicely balanced. Very easy, representative, succulent example of 2010. Lots of integrity.
Jancis Robinson MW- jancis robinson.com, Apr 2011 Read more
Wine Spectator92-95/100
Very sappy and intense, with mouthwatering acidity framing the cassis, violet and tobacco notes, followed by a supervibrant finish that features lots of cassis bush character. The Petit Verdot isn't as obvious on the nose as the 2000, which had 10 percent in the blend, but just as prevalent on the taut finish, where there's plenty of spice, drive and cut. Tasted non-blind.
James Molesworth – The Wine Spectator – Top Scoring Bordeaux 2010 – 31 Mar 2011

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Robert Parker95+/100
The 2010 Pichon Lalande is performing extremely well and at the top of the range I predicted several years ago. A final blend dominated much more by Cabernet Sauvignon than usual (66% Cabernet Sauvignon, 24% Merlot, 7% Cabernet Franc and the rest Petit Verdot), the wine is a tighter, more tannic and structured version of this famed Pauillac, which often tends to have more of a St-Julien-like personality than most Pauillacs. Structured, backward and tannic, yet showing a fat mid-palate that is more savory, broader and more expansive than I remember from barrel, this wine is somewhat reminiscent of the 1986, given the Cabernet Sauvignon domination of the blend. Full-bodied, impressively endowed, and less sexy and velvety than normal, this is a somewhat different style of Pichon Lalande than most readers have been used to. Whether you like it more or less will depend on your point of view, but this wine, unlike most Pichon Lalandes, needs a good 5-7 years of cellaring and should keep for 30+ years.
Robert Parker- Wine Advocate- Feb 2013

I tasted the 2010 Pichon Lalande on three separate occasions, two consistent and one that underperformed, hence the question mark. A blend of 66% Cabernet Sauvignon, 24% Merlot, 7% Cabernet Franc and 3% Petit Verdot, it reveals an opaque purple color as well as a thick, unctuous style with fresh blackberry and cassis fruit intermixed with hints of graphite, herbs and coffee. The vintage’s tell-tale minerality is present in this structured, tannic, backward effort. It will require 5-6 years of cellaring and should age for 25-30 years.
Robert Parker- Wine Advocate- May 2011 Read more
Decanter18.5/20
Lovely expression of supple, rich fruit, beautiful middle palate, lacks perhaps the power of some wines in this vintage, but makes up for it in polish and elegance. Read more

About this WINE

Château Pichon Comtesse

Château Pichon Comtesse

Château Pichon Comtesse is an estate in Pauillac on the Left Bank of Bordeaux. The estate was ranked a Second Growth in Bordeaux’s 1855 classification, and belongs to an unofficial group referred to as “Super Seconds”.

It is located in the southern part of the Pauillac appellation, just next to Château Latour and a short distance from the border with St Julien. The attractive château building here is visible from the D2 road as you approach Pauillac from the south, on the opposite side of the street from Château Pichon Baron. The two neighbours were once part of one larger estate, which was divided in two in 1850. From 1978 until the mid-2000s, Pichon Comtesse was managed by Madame May-Eliane de Lencquesaing, one of the most prominent women in Bordeaux history.

Today, the estate belongs to the Rouzaud family, owners of Champagne Louis Roederer. The estate, which currently has 80 hectares of vines, is managed by talented winemaker Nicolas Glumineau. Nicolas and his team also manage Château de Pez, a sibling estate further north in St Estèphe.

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Pauillac

Pauillac

Pauillac is the aristocrat of the Médoc boasting boasting 75 percent of the region’s First Growths and with Grand Cru Classés representing 84 percent of Pauillac's production.

For a small town, surrounded by so many familiar and regal names, Pauillac imparts a slightly seedy impression. There are no grand hotels or restaurants – with the honourable exception of the establishments owned by Jean-Michel Cazes – rather a small port and yacht harbour, and a dominant petrochemical plant.

Yet outside the town, , there is arguably the greatest concentration of fabulous vineyards throughout all Bordeaux, including three of the five First Growths. Bordering St Estèphe to the north and St Julien to the south, Pauillac has fine, deep gravel soils with important iron and marl deposits, and a subtle, softly-rolling landscape, cut by a series of small streams running into the Gironde. The vineyards are located on two gravel-rich plateaux, one to the northwest of the town of Pauillac and the other to the south, with the vines reaching a greater depth than anywhere else in the Médoc.

Pauillac's first growths each have their own unique characteristics; Lafite Rothschild, tucked in the northern part of Pauillac on the St Estèphe border, produces Pauillac's most aromatically complex and subtly-flavoured wine. Mouton Rothschild's vineyards lie on a well-drained gravel ridge and - with its high percentage of Cabernet Sauvignon - can produce (in its best years) Pauillac's most decadently rich, fleshy and exotic wine.

Latour, arguably Bordeaux's most consistent First Growth, is located in southern Pauillac next to St Julien. Its soil is gravel-rich with superb drainage, and Latour's vines penetrate as far as five metres into the soil. It produces perhaps the most long-lived wines of the Médoc.

Recommended Châteaux
Ch. Lafite-Rothschild, Ch. Latour, Ch. Mouton-Rothschild, Ch. Pichon-Longueville Baron, Ch. Pichon Longueville Comtesse de Lalande, Ch. Lynch-Bages, Ch. Grand-Puy-Lacoste, Ch, Pontet-Canet, Les Forts de Latour, Ch. Haut-Batailley, Ch. Batailley, Ch. Haut-Bages Libéral.

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Cabernet Sauvignon Blend

Cabernet Sauvignon Blend

Cabernet Sauvignon lends itself particularly well in blends with Merlot. This is actually the archetypal Bordeaux blend, though in different proportions in the sub-regions and sometimes topped up with Cabernet Franc, Malbec, and Petit Verdot.

In the Médoc and Graves the percentage of Cabernet Sauvignon in the blend can range from 95% (Mouton-Rothschild) to as low as 40%. It is particularly suited to the dry, warm, free- draining, gravel-rich soils and is responsible for the redolent cassis characteristics as well as the depth of colour, tannic structure and pronounced acidity of Médoc wines. However 100% Cabernet Sauvignon wines can be slightly hollow-tasting in the middle palate and Merlot with its generous, fleshy fruit flavours acts as a perfect foil by filling in this cavity.

In St-Emilion and Pomerol, the blends are Merlot dominated as Cabernet Sauvignon can struggle to ripen there - when it is included, it adds structure and body to the wine. Sassicaia is the most famous Bordeaux blend in Italy and has spawned many imitations, whereby the blend is now firmly established in the New World and particularly in California and  Australia.

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