2011 Châteauneuf-du-Pape, Henri Bonneau, Rhône

2011 Châteauneuf-du-Pape, Henri Bonneau, Rhône

Product: 20111470587
2011 Châteauneuf-du-Pape, Henri Bonneau, Rhône

Description

The classic 2011 Chteauneuf du Pape is a sexy, medium-bodied, sunny wine thats loaded with notions of garrigue, kirsch, incense and fruit cake aromas and flavors. While I suspect it will be on a relatively fast evolutionary track, the fact is that these long elevage, which are the MO at this estate, result in a stable, age-worthy wine, even in forward, charming vintages such as 2011. Still, dont hesitate to enjoy this in its youth.
Jeb Dunnuck - 28/10/2016

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Critics reviews

Wine Advocate90-92/100
Wine Advocate90-92/100
The classic 2011 Chteauneuf du Pape is a sexy, medium-bodied, sunny wine thats loaded with notions of garrigue, kirsch, incense and fruit cake aromas and flavors. While I suspect it will be on a relatively fast evolutionary track, the fact is that these long elevage, which are the MO at this estate, result in a stable, age-worthy wine, even in forward, charming vintages such as 2011. Still, dont hesitate to enjoy this in its youth.
Jeb Dunnuck - 28/10/2016 Read more

About this WINE

Domaine Henri Bonneau

Domaine Henri Bonneau

Henri Bonneau is one of the true legends of Châteauneuf du Pape. He is the 12th generation of Bonneaus to produce wine in Châteauneuf and is now aided in the cellars by his son, Marcel. Henri has 6 hectares of vineyards, split between 5.25ha in La Crau (arguably Châteauneuf's finest terroir) and 0.75ha on stonier soil near Couthézon in the north east of the appellation.

His wines are produced predominantly from Grenache (80-90%) with small quantities of Mourvèdre, Counoise and Vaccarèse. Henri harvests as late as possible, a policy that usually produces superripe fruit although sometimes he does gets caught out by October rains. Yields are kept low and vinfication and elevage are traditional with the use of wooden foudres and smaller oak barrels. Typically the wine are aged in oak for 3-4 years before being bottled unfiltered. His top cuvée, Réserve des Celestins displays intensely concentrated black fruit and is without question one of the finest of all Châteauneufs.

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Châteauneuf-du-Pape

Châteauneuf-du-Pape

The most celebrated village of the Southern Rhône, Châteauneuf-du-Pape is the birthplace of the now indispensable French Appellation d’Origine Contrôlée system – imperfect though it may be. Compared to the Northern Rhône, the vineyards here are relatively flat and often feature the iconic galet pebbles – the precise benefits of which are a source of much debate. Minimum alcohol levels required by the AOC are the highest in France, but at 12.5% it is well below the natural generosity of Grenache, which only achieves its full aromatic potential when it is fully ripe and laden with the resultant high sugars. Syrah and Mourvèdre contribute the other defining elements in the blend, adding pepper, savoury spice and structure to the decadent Grenache. There are a further 10 permitted red grape varieties which can be used to adjust the “seasoning”. Of the five white varieties permitted, it is Grenache Noir’s sibling – predictably perhaps – Grenache Blanc, which dominates, though Roussanne shows a great deal of promise when handled well, notably at Château de Beaucastel.

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Grenache/Garnacha

Grenache/Garnacha

Grenache (Noir) is widely grown and comes in a variety of styles. Believed to originate in Spain, it was, in the late 20th century, the most widely planted black grape variety in the world. Today it hovers around seventh in the pecking order. It tends to produce very fruity, rich wines that can range quite widely in their level of tannin.

In many regions – most famously the Southern Rhône, where it complements Syrah and Mourvèdre, among other grapes – it adds backbone and colour to blends, but some of the most notable Châteauneuf du Pape producers (such as Château Rayas) make 100 percent Grenache wines. The grape is a component in many wines of the Languedoc (where you’ll also find its lighter-coloured forms, Grenache Gris and Blanc) and is responsible for much southern French rosé – taking the lead in most Provence styles.

Found all over Spain as Garnacha Tinta (spelt Garnaxa in Catalonia), the grape variety is increasingly detailed on wine labels there. Along with Tempranillo, it forms the majority of the blend for Rioja’s reds and has been adopted widely in Navarra, where it produces lighter styles of red and rosado (rosé). It can also be found operating under a pseudonym, Cannonau, in Sardinia.

 

Beyond Europe, Grenache is widely planted in California and Australia, largely thanks to its ability to operate in high temperatures and without much water. Particularly in the Barossa Valley, there are some extraordinary dry-farmed bush vines, some of which are centuries old and produce wines of startling intensity.

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