2012 Champagne Goutorbe-Bouillot, Clos des Monnaies, Brut

2012 Champagne Goutorbe-Bouillot, Clos des Monnaies, Brut

Product: 20128059631
Prices start from £93.75 per bottle (75cl). Buying options
2012 Champagne Goutorbe-Bouillot, Clos des Monnaies, Brut

Buying options

Available for delivery or collection. Pricing includes duty and VAT.
Bottle (75cl)
 x 1
£93.75
Limited availability
Free delivery on orders over £200. Find out more

Description

Orange peel, gingersnaps, lemon meringue pie and some salted caramel here. Creamy and generous yet not heavy, with a medium body, soft bubbles and a supple, silky finish. Pinot Meunier and Chardonnay. Disgorged July 2022. 2g/L dosage. 

Drink now

James Suckling, JamesSuckling.com (August 2023)

wine at a glance

Delivery and quality guarantee

Critics reviews

James Suckling92/100

Orange peel, gingersnaps, lemon meringue pie and some salted caramel here. Creamy and generous yet not heavy, with a medium body, soft bubbles and a supple, silky finish. Pinot Meunier and Chardonnay. Disgorged July 2022. 2g/L dosage. 

Drink now

James Suckling, JamesSuckling.com (August 2023)

Read more
Jeb Dunnuck93/100

The 2012 Champagne Clos des Monnaies Brut is equal parts Meunier and Chardonnay, from a tiny walled clos of 0.28 hectares. It was fermented and aged in neutral oak and rested on its lees in bottle for 50 months before disgorgement in May 2021. It pours a medium yellow hue with a fragrant perfume of white flowers and flows into clean, pure orchard fruit and chalk. 

The palate is balanced and medium-bodied, with tension and length, and vibrant with lime, saline, and refreshing energy. It feels super youthful in its present state and can go for another 10-15 years.

Drink 2022 - 2037

Audrey Frick, JebDunnuck.com (November 2022)

Read more

About this WINE

Champagne Goutorbe-Bouillot

Champagne Goutorbe-Bouillot

Champagne Goutorbe-Bouillot, a venerable family enterprise situated in the picturesque village of Damery within the Marne Valley, stands at the heart of Champagne, embodying a legacy rooted in tradition since 1911. The Bouillot family, alongside the Goutorbe and Palpeux, passionately champion their philosophy of terroir respect, crafting a narrative that harmonises with the land.

Since 1980, the Domaine has embraced the "solera" or "perpetual reserve" method, an emblem of their dedication to crafting nuanced and exceptional Champagnes. A noteworthy aspect of their craft is the meticulous blending of vintages, with some creations boasting a fusion of wines aged for over 30 years.

Like the Solera system, Goutorbe-Bouillot utilises 50% of its annual reserve in the yearly blend. This intricate dance results in a wine that bears the imprints of bygone vintages, each contributing to a symphony of flavours and textures. The inception of this perpetual reserve dates back to 1980 for the Carte d’Or, extending to other non-vintage cuvées in 2000.

One of their stellar creations, a blend of 80% Pinot Noir and 20% Chardonnay, undergoes no malolactic fermentation. The result is a wine of remarkable depth, offering a compelling interplay of rich, gripping textures, aromatic intricacies, abundant brioche notes, and a resplendent lemony finish.

Find out more
Brut Champagne

Brut Champagne

Brut denotes a dry style of Champagne (less than 15 grams per litre). Most Champagne is non-vintage, produced from a blend from different years. The non-vintage blend is always based predominately on wines made from the current harvest, enriched with aged wines (their proportion and age varies by brand) from earlier harvests, which impart an additional level of complexity to the end wine. Champagnes from a single vintage are labelled with the year reference and with the description Millésimé.

Non-vintage Champagnes can improve with short-term ageing (typically two to three years), while vintages can develop over much longer periods (five to 30 years). The most exquisite and often top-priced expression of a house’s style is referred to as Prestige Cuvée. Famous examples include Louis Roederer's Cristal, Moët & Chandon's Dom Pérignon, and Pol Roger's Cuvée Sir Winston Churchill.

Recommended Producers : Krug, Billecart Salmon, Pol Roger, Bollinger, Salon, Gosset, Pierre Péters, Ruinart


Find out more
Champagne blend

Champagne blend

Which grapes are included in the blend, and their proportion, is one of the key factors determining the style of most Champagnes. Three grapes are used - Pinot Noir, Chardonnay and Pinot Meunier.

26% of vineyards in Champagne are planted with Chardonnay and it performs best on the Côtes des Blancs and on the chalk slopes south of Epernay. It is relatively simple to grow, although it buds early and thus is susceptible to spring frosts. It produces lighter, fresher wines than those from Burgundy and gives finesse, fruit and elegance to the final blend. It is the sole grape in Blancs de Blancs, which are some of the richest long-lived Champagnes produced.

Pinot Noir accounts for nearly 40% of the plantings in Champagne and lies at the heart of most blends - it gives Champagne its body, structure, strength and grip. It is planted across Champagne and particularly so in the southern Aube district.

The final component is Pinot Meunier and this constitutes nearly 35% of the plantings. Its durability and resistance to spring frosts make the Marne Valley, a notorious frost pocket, its natural home. It ripens well in poor years and produces a soft, fruity style of wine that is ideal for blending with the more assertive flavours of Pinot Noir. Producers allege that Pinot Meunier lacks ageing potential, but this does not deter Krug from including around 15% of it in their final blends.


Find out more