2013 Bourgogne Vézelay, L'Elegante, Domaine la Croix Montjoie

2013 Bourgogne Vézelay, L'Elegante, Domaine la Croix Montjoie

Product: 20131368152
2013 Bourgogne Vézelay, L'Elegante, Domaine la Croix Montjoie

Description

This cuvée – they also make l’Impatiente and la Voluptueuse – of Chardonnay from the Bourgogne Vézelay appellation comes from 30-year-old vines grown on limestone. The wine is fermented and matured in a mix of tank and older barrels.
Jasper Morris MW
 
This feels a world away from nearby Chablis: an exotic, pineapple, almost passion fruit, and tinned peach nose leads to a fulsome palate which is quite round and fat, yet still manages to retain its eponymous elegance.

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About this WINE

Domaine la Croix Montjoie

Domaine la Croix Montjoie

Domaine La Croix Montjoie was established in 2009, and was named after the crossroads of Vezelay, which lies between Chablis and Beaune.

The estate has ten acres of vineyards overlooking the basilica and the foothills of the Morvan. Chardonnay is grown here, with an ideal location of a south/south-east facing hillside and stony clay and limestone rich soil. The grapes are cultivated to make the most of the naturally occurring seasons, including the harsh winters and cool summer nights.

Pinot Black Irancy is also grown, slightly further north of Vezelay. The vineyards and building management are family run, with the help of close friends, and all are involved in the ongoing development of the business.

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Cremant de Bourgogne

Cremant de Bourgogne

Crémant de Bourgogne is the appellation used to describe the sparkling wines produced in Burgundy, which can be either white or rosé but not red, as these are known as Bourgogne Mousseux. It is made using the same ‘Méthode Traditionelle’ that is used to create the more famous Champagne, however due to the lack of the Champagne brand, Crémant de Bourgogne wines are much cheaper than their A-list cousins, resulting in wines that are comparable in quality to Champagne but far easier on the bank balance. Crémant de Bourgogne wines fall under 4 categories inside the AOC itself, which are as follows:

Le crémant de Bourgogne blanc – this consists of at least 30% Chardonnay or Pinot Noir.

Le crémant de Bourgogne blanc de blancs – this is made from just Chardonnay and is generally described as a very light and lively wine.

Le crémant de Bourgogne blanc de noirs – this is made predominantly from Pinot Noir, Pinot Meunier or both together, and tends to be a little richer and with a bit more body.

Le crémant de Bourgogne rosé – the rosé wine is made almost entirely from Pinot Noir, occasionally with auxiliary Gamay.

The acidic grape variety Aligoté is often used to increase the effervescence of the wine to give it a little more sparkle. Crémant de Bourgogne production takes place chiefly in the regions of Auxerre and the Côte Chalonnaise.

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Chardonnay

Chardonnay

Chardonnay is the "Big Daddy" of white wine grapes and one of the most widely planted in the world. It is suited to a wide variety of soils, though it excels in soils with a high limestone content as found in Champagne, Chablis, and the Côte D`Or.

Burgundy is Chardonnay's spiritual home and the best White Burgundies are dry, rich, honeyed wines with marvellous poise, elegance and balance. They are unquestionably the finest dry white wines in the world. Chardonnay plays a crucial role in the Champagne blend, providing structure and finesse, and is the sole grape in Blanc de Blancs.

It is quantitatively important in California and Australia, is widely planted in Chile and South Africa, and is the second most widely planted grape in New Zealand. In warm climates Chardonnay has a tendency to develop very high sugar levels during the final stages of ripening and this can occur at the expense of acidity. Late picking is a common problem and can result in blowsy and flabby wines that lack structure and definition.

Recently in the New World, we have seen a move towards more elegant, better- balanced and less oak-driven Chardonnays, and this is to be welcomed.

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