2013 Te Mata Estate, Coleraine, Hawkes Bay

2013 Te Mata Estate, Coleraine, Hawkes Bay

Product: 20138114310
Prices start from £295.00 per case Buying options
2013 Te Mata Estate, Coleraine, Hawkes Bay

Description

Lots of pulpy, bright cassis fruit on the nose. Toasty as well from the 18 months in barrel (French oak, mostly new). Lots of brambly black fruit on the palate. Tannins are perfectly ripe and integrated. Very complete mouth feel and lingering finish. Bitter chocolate note on finish with a fresh redcurrant acidity. Superb this year. Give it a couple of years in the cellar.
Fergus Stewart - Private Account Manager
 
The nose is rich, opulent and broad; but has the detail and intricacies that vintages such as 2009 now have. On the palate one could be forgiven for thinking that this is a top level Medoc Claret in a great vintage. Such is the palate saturating, rich, complex fruit character. There is a wonderful wave of fine, ripe tannins just waiting to unfurl, which when they do is like a whirlwind on the palate. There is great freshness and coolness to this wine and although I haven’t re-tasted their last few efforts recently I am more than happy to declare this the best I’ve tasted.
Gary Owen - Private Account Manager
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About this WINE

Te Mata Estate

Te Mata Estate

Te Mata Estate is New Zealand's oldest winery, dating from the early 1890's. Vines were first planted at Te Mata Estate in 1892 on three parcels of hillside land above the homestead. Today, Te Mata Estate still utilises those original three vineyards to produce its most famous wines; Coleraine, Awatea and Elston. Coleraine derives its name from the Coleraine vineyard, home of John & Wendy Buck who have been co-owners of Te Mata Estate since 1978. All the original vineyards have been replanted.

It is a New Zealand family owned winery - a true estate, specialising in grape growing and winemaking from its ten Hawke's Bay vineyards. Acknowledged as one of only five icon wineries in New Zealand. Te Mata's completely handmade wines are renowned as the country's finest.

Under the direction of John Buck, Te Mata Estate has, over nearly thirty years, produced a stunning array of red and white wines including such famous labels as Coleraine and Awatea Cabernet/Merlots, Bullnose Syrah, Elston Chardonnay and Cape Crest Sauvignon Blanc.

The first Coleraine was made from the 1982 vintage and created an instant sensation within New Zealand for its quality. Originally a single vineyard wine, from 1989 Coleraine has been an assemblage of the finest Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, and Cabernet Franc wines produced from thirty plots within Te Mata Estate’s nine Hawke’s Bay vineyards. Peter Cowley, now Technical Director, has been in charge of winemaking since 1984.

Not content to rest on its laurels, Te Mata has also developed a unique single vineyard from which it produces its Woodthorpe wines.

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Hawkes Bay

Hawkes Bay

Hawkes Bay, encompassing Napier on the east coast of North Island, is New Zealand's second largest region by plantings, with 4,500 hectares (or 20 percent of the country's total) in 2006. It is led by Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon (34 percent), Chardonnay (23 percent), Sauvignon Blanc (16.5 percent) and Pinot Noir (nine percent).

It boasts a diverse spread of soils, from fertile alluvial to stony dry, resulting in an array of variously-sized wineries from the small to the not-so-small; the region accounts for 12.5 percent of the country's 530 wineries, suggesting a happy balance between the two.

Hawkes Bay continues to fine-tune its Merlot/Cabernet Sauvignon/Franc Bordeaux blends, offering some fine, fresh, pencil-shaving-nuanced examples, particularly from the Te Mata Estate (ie Coleraine). The more recent success story seems to be that of Syrah, in a cool, black pepper Northern Rhône style.

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Cab.Sauvignon Blend

Cab.Sauvignon Blend

Cabernet Sauvignon lends itself particularly well in blends with Merlot. This is actually the archetypal Bordeaux blend, though in different proportions in the sub-regions and sometimes topped up with Cabernet Franc, Malbec, and Petit Verdot.

In the Médoc and Graves the percentage of Cabernet Sauvignon in the blend can range from 95% (Mouton-Rothschild) to as low as 40%. It is particularly suited to the dry, warm, free- draining, gravel-rich soils and is responsible for the redolent cassis characteristics as well as the depth of colour, tannic structure and pronounced acidity of Médoc wines. However 100% Cabernet Sauvignon wines can be slightly hollow-tasting in the middle palate and Merlot with its generous, fleshy fruit flavours acts as a perfect foil by filling in this cavity.

In St-Emilion and Pomerol, the blends are Merlot dominated as Cabernet Sauvignon can struggle to ripen there - when it is included, it adds structure and body to the wine. Sassicaia is the most famous Bordeaux blend in Italy and has spawned many imitations, whereby the blend is now firmly established in the New World and particularly in California and  Australia.

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Reviews

Customer reviews

Suckling96/100

Critic reviews

Suckling96/100
At the risk of this being a cliché, this Coleraine would give Bordeaux classified growths a run for their money. It is a powerful and intense wine, and yet remains elegant and precise. Richly aromatic, giving ripe, black sweet fruit on entry and an attractive herbal note. Densely fruited on the mid palate followed up with abundant sinewy tannins. There's lots of new French oak used in the making of this wine, but it's integrated, adding Christmas cake spice flavors to the mix. Long persistence. This is a baby and is going nowhere fast and will continue to develop for 10 years plus. 56% Cab Sauvignon, 30% Merlot, 14% Cab Franc.
James Suckling Read more