2014 Pommard, Clos des Epeneaux, 1er Cru Domaine du Comte Armand

2014 Pommard, Clos des Epeneaux, 1er Cru Domaine du Comte Armand

Product: 20141026524
Prices start from £125.00 per bottle (75cl). Buying options
2014 Pommard, Clos des Epeneaux, 1er Cru Domaine du Comte Armand

Description

Just 12hl/ha but that is still better than 2012 or 2013. Made with 30 percent new wood, this is a glorious imperial purple; on the nose, it’s really fragrant, lifted and lovely. To taste, there’s raspberry fruit mixed with alpine strawberries, some darker fruit too, the whole stretching beautifully across the palate. It has medium density and a pure and stylish finish. There’s a little touch of tannin at the back to remind us that it is Pommard – and a very fine one at that.

Paul Zinetti has replaced Benjamin Leroux as régisseur (general manager) at this famous estate. He has inherited a great position but also, alas, a tradition of hail-affected vintages. With this in mind, Paul has looked for lighter extraction in 2014, with less punching down than previously. He has been with the domaine for several years prior to taking over, so he is fully au fait with these vineyards. The village Auxey is a steal this year.
Read more

wine at a glance

Delivery and quality guarantee

Buying options

Available for delivery or collection. Pricing includes duty and VAT.
Bottle (75cl)
Free delivery on orders over £200. Find out more

About this WINE

Domaine Comte Armand

Domaine Comte Armand

The family of the Comte Armand has owned the vineyard of Clos des Epéneaux and the winery buildings in Pommard since 1826 when Jean-François Armand married Clothilde Marey. Unfortunately the vineyard was not replanted after phylloxera until 1930, but since then it has confirmed its rating as one of Pommard’s very finest sites.

Pascal Marchand, a young Quebecois from the merchant marine, made the wines here from the 1985 to 1998 vintages inclusive. During his time in charge he completely transformed the domaine, elevating its ranking to that of the greatest estate in Pommard. His place has been taken by Benjamin Leroux who had been working part time at the domaine during his studies since 1991.

Benjamin Leroux, still in his thirties and newly married to an English girl from Silverstone, has been in charge at Comte Armand since 1999. He is one of Burgundy's most vociferous advocates of bio-dynamic viticulture (with a particular interest in lunar cycles) and his No 1 spot in Bourgogne Aujourd'hui magazine's Top 10 for the next decade came as no surprise. After years of organic farming, with certification since 2005, the domaine is now biodynamic. The Clos des Epeneaux is being worked by horses (in part so as to be able to compare horse against tractor; the soil has become much finer in the horse-ploughed sector), while various fruit trees, roses and other plants have been introduced along the walls. A colony of bees was to follow, but they did not survive the intense heat of the summer of 2003.
 
Where possible the grapes are picked on suitable days in the biodynamic calendar and each cuvée is thereafter maintained on a 28-day cycle – thus 28 days cuvaison (one week cold maceration, one week fermentation, two weeks post-fermentation maceration), with racking and other treatments following in multiples of 28 days. Benjamin notes that after three weeks in vat, the tannins often become tough and disagreeable but it is important not to panic. By the end of four weeks the wine has come back into balance and seems to show enhanced terroir character in place of primary fruit.
 
After many years when the Clos des Epeneaux was the sole wine made at the domaine, further vineyards were acquired in 1994: Auxey-Duresses, Auxey-Duresses premier cru, Volnay and Volnay Fremiets. The younger vines from the Clos des Epeneaux are also sold as Pommard or Pommard premier cru.
 
In July 2008 I attended an extraordinary tasting to celebrate the bicentenary of the putative original enclosure of the vineyard by Nicolas Marey – the exact date is uncertain but it was in the first decade of the 19th century. It was extraordinary to see the character of the vineyard assert itself under the tutelage of gifted winemakers, and to be diverted by those less meticulous. The 1864 vintage remained in a state of grace even 40 minutes after opening.

Cuvée of Auxey Duresses comes from purchased grapes from three different vineyards on the flank of the hillside where Auxey takes over from Meursault. The wine is aged in larger barrels so as not to show too much oak. The cuvée is named for an ancestor of the Comte Armand’s, Nicolas Marey, who bought extensive vineyards just after the French revolution.

Comte Armand's Pommard Clos des Epéneaux must surely be considered among the great red wines of all Burgundy. But don't be in a hurry to drink it.

Jasper Morris MW, Burgundy Wine Director and author of the award-winning Inside Burgundy comprehensive handbook.

Find out more
Pommard

Pommard

The most powerful red wines of the Côte de Beaune emanate from Pommard, where complex soils with a high proportion of iron-rich clay produce deep-coloured, relatively tannic wines. A Pommard that is ready to drink in its first few years is probably not going to be a great example of the appellation.

Two vineyards stand out: the lower part of Les Rugiens, which has been mooted for promotion to Grand Cru status, and the five-hectare, walled Clos des Epéneaux, monopoly of Comte Armand.
  • 212 hectares of village Pommard
  • 125 hectares of Premier Cru vineyards (28 in all). The finest vineyards include Les Rugiens, Les Epénots (including Clos des Epéneaux) and Pézérolles
  • Recommended producers: Comte Armandde Montille, de Courcel, J-M Boillot

Find out more
Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir is probably the most frustrating, and at times infuriating, wine grape in the world. However when it is successful, it can produce some of the most sublime wines known to man. This thin-skinned grape which grows in small, tight bunches performs well on well-drained, deepish limestone based subsoils as are found on Burgundy's Côte d'Or.

Pinot Noir is more susceptible than other varieties to over cropping - concentration and varietal character disappear rapidly if yields are excessive and yields as little as 25hl/ha are the norm for some climats of the Côte d`Or.

Because of the thinness of the skins, Pinot Noir wines are lighter in colour, body and tannins. However the best wines have grip, complexity and an intensity of fruit seldom found in wine from other grapes. Young Pinot Noir can smell almost sweet, redolent with freshly crushed raspberries, cherries and redcurrants. When mature, the best wines develop a sensuous, silky mouth feel with the fruit flavours deepening and gamey "sous-bois" nuances emerging.

The best examples are still found in Burgundy, although Pinot Noir`s key role in Champagne should not be forgotten. It is grown throughout the world with notable success in the Carneros and Russian River Valley districts of California, and the Martinborough and Central Otago regions of New Zealand.

Find out more

Reviews

Customer reviews

The Wine Advocate90/100

Critic reviews

The Wine Advocate90/100
Tasted blind at the Burgfest 2014 tasting, the 2014 Pommard 1er Cru Clos des Epeneaux from Comte Armand has quite a nuanced nose with dusky red berry fruit, autumn leaves and a touch of stewed black tea. I like the cohesion and focus here. The palate is medium-bodied with a fine line of acidity, nicely balanced and supple in the mouth. There is something easy-drinking and approachable about this Pommard: well crafted and with satisfying tension. While not the greatest in recent vintages, this is still a pleasurable Pommard that overcame the hail that destroyed 90% of the vineyard that year. Tasted September 2017.
Neal Martin - 31/10/2017 Read more