2014 Pommard, Clos de Epenots, 1er Cru, Château de Meursault, Burgundy

2014 Pommard, Clos de Epenots, 1er Cru, Château de Meursault, Burgundy

Product: 20148212452
Prices start from £298.00 per case Buying options
2014 Pommard, Clos de Epenots, 1er Cru, Château de Meursault, Burgundy

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About this WINE

Chateau de Meursault

Chateau de Meursault

The Paulée de Meursault is held on the Monday after the Hospices de Beaune sale every year, with the cuvérie being cleared of vats and vintage paraphernalia in order to lay tables for lunch for 600 people, the guests having been greeted at the door and then wended their way through the extensive subterranean cellars of the Chateau’s outbuildings.
 
The Chateau’s holdings extend to over 60ha, including 8ha of the Clos du Chateau, former park land which was planted up in 1975. There is a substantial cuvée of village Meursault raised in new wood, a 1er cru which combines Charmes and Perrières and just over half a hectare of Puligny-Montrachet 1er Cru Champ Canet.
 
There are significant volumes of red Burgundy produced here as well, notably a Beaune 1er Cru from ten different plots and separate bottlings of Beaune Grèves and Cent Vignes. In addition the Château enjoys a holding of 3.60ha of Pommard Clos des Epenots, not to be confused with the Comte Armand’s Clos des Epeneaux, and 2.6ha of Volnay Clos des Chênes.

Jasper Morris MW, Burgundy Wine Director and author of the award-winning Inside Burgundy comprehensive handbook.

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Meursault

Meursault

There are more top producers in Meursault than in any other commune of the Côte d’Or. Certainly it is the most famous and popular of the great white appellations. Its wines are typically rich and savoury with nutty, honeyed hints and buttery, vanilla spice from the oak.

Even though it is considerably larger than its southerly neighbours Chassagne and Puligny, Meursault contains no Grands Crus. Its three best Premiers Crus, however – Les Perrières, Les Genevrières and Les Charmes – produce some of the region’s greatest whites: they are full, round and powerful, and age very well. Les Perrières in particular can produce wines of Grand Cru quality, a fact that is often reflected in its price. Meursault has also been one of the driving forces of biodynamic viticulture in the region, as pioneered by Lafon and Leflaive.

Many of the vineyards below Premier Cru, known as ‘village’ wines, are also well worth looking at. The growers vinify their different vineyard holdings separately, which rarely happens in Puligny or Chassagne. Such wines can be labelled with the ‘lieu-dit’ vineyard alongside (although in smaller type to) the Meursault name.

Premier Cru Meursault should be enjoyed from five to 15 years of age, although top examples can last even longer. Village wines, meanwhile, are normally at their best from three to 10 years.

Very occasionally, red Meursault is produced with some fine, firm results. The best red Pinot Noir terroir, Les Santenots, is afforded the courtesy title of Volnay Santenots, even though it is actually in Meursault.

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Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir is probably the most frustrating, and at times infuriating, wine grape in the world. However when it is successful, it can produce some of the most sublime wines known to man. This thin-skinned grape which grows in small, tight bunches performs well on well-drained, deepish limestone based subsoils as are found on Burgundy's Côte d'Or.

Pinot Noir is more susceptible than other varieties to over cropping - concentration and varietal character disappear rapidly if yields are excessive and yields as little as 25hl/ha are the norm for some climats of the Côte d`Or.

Because of the thinness of the skins, Pinot Noir wines are lighter in colour, body and tannins. However the best wines have grip, complexity and an intensity of fruit seldom found in wine from other grapes. Young Pinot Noir can smell almost sweet, redolent with freshly crushed raspberries, cherries and redcurrants. When mature, the best wines develop a sensuous, silky mouth feel with the fruit flavours deepening and gamey "sous-bois" nuances emerging.

The best examples are still found in Burgundy, although Pinot Noir`s key role in Champagne should not be forgotten. It is grown throughout the world with notable success in the Carneros and Russian River Valley districts of California, and the Martinborough and Central Otago regions of New Zealand.

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