2016 Penfolds, Grange, Bin 95, Shiraz, Australia

2016 Penfolds, Grange, Bin 95, Shiraz, Australia

Product: 20161004285
Prices start from £417.00 per bottle (75cl). Buying options
2016 Penfolds, Grange, Bin 95, Shiraz, Australia

Description

Even within the context of its enviable reputation, year after year Grange can now quite unapologetically boast of concerning itself with only one quality level - the best. 2016 continues in this vein with a supremely detailed, pixilated offering that at once flaunts typical ambition and breadth but is delivered in a far more considered and nuanced way than it might have, say 20 years ago.

A quiet and unassuming beginning lures you in to top notes of clove, desiccated coconut and brioche toast before the inevitable siren call of utterly irresistible red and blue fruits. The nose continues, building layers of interest before an unexpected and most invigorating crescendo of cool, crunchy freshness is delivered like a refreshing sea breeze.

The palate is full but never overblown and rather pretty for such a youthful Grange. The neatness and exactitude here bely the sheer complexity and potential of this wine making it captivating even now. Experience teaches however that this will cellar for three to four decades effortlessly. Drink 2026-2066.
Jared Ehret, Private Account Manager
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Bottle (75cl)
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£2,502.00
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About this WINE

Penfolds

Penfolds

Penfolds enjoys an iconic status that few New World producers have achieved. Established in 1844 at the Magill Estate near Adelaide, it laid the foundation for fine wine production in Australia.

The winemaking team is led by the masterful Peter Gago; it has the herculean task of blending the best wines from a multitude of different plots, vineyards and regions to create a consistent and outstanding range of wines. Its flagship wine, Grange, is firmly established as one of the finest red wines in the world.

Under Gago’s stewardship, the Penfolds range has evolved over time. Winemaking has moved away from New World heat and the sort of larger-than-life style that can mask individuality; the contemporary wines instead favour fine balance and typicity for the region or grape.

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Barossa Valley

Barossa Valley

Barossa Valley is the South Australia's wine industry's birthplace. Currently into its fifth generation, it dates back to 1839 when George Fife Angas’ South Australian Company purchased 28,000 acres at a £1 per acre and sold them onto landed gentry, mostly German Lutherans. The first vines were planted in 1843 in Bethany, and by the 1870s – with Europe ravaged by war and Phylloxera - Gladstone’s British government complemented its colonies with preferential duties.

Fortified wines, strong enough to survive the 20,000km journey, flooded the British market. Churchill followed, between the Wars, re-affirming Australia’s position as a leading supplier of ‘Empire wines’. After the Second World War, mass European immigration saw a move to lighter wines, as confirmed by Grange Hermitage’s creation during the 1950s. Stainless-steel vats and refrigeration improved the quality of the dry table wines on offer, with table wine consumption exceeding fortified for the first time in 1970.

Averaging 200 to 400 metres’ altitude, the region covers 6,500 hectares of mainly terra rossa loam over limestone, as well as some warmer, sandier sites – the Cambrian limestone being far more visible along the eastern boundary (the Barossa Ranges) with Eden Valley. Following a diagonal shape, Lyndoch at the southern end nearest Gulf St Vincent is the region’s coolest spot, benefiting from sea fogs, while Nuriootpa (further north) is warmer; hot northerlies can be offset by sea breezes. The region is also home to the country’s largest concentration of 100-year-old-vine ShirazGrenache and Mourvedre.

Barossa Valley Shiraz is one of the country’s most identifiable and famous red wine styles, produced to a high quality by the likes of Rockford, Elderton, Torbreck and Dean Hewitson. Grenache and Mourvèdre are two of the region’s hidden gems, often blended with Shiraz, yet occasionally released as single vineyard styles such as Hewitson’s ‘Old Garden’, whose vines date back to 1853. Cabernet Sauvignon is a less highly-regarded cultivar.

Wines are traditionally vinified in open concrete fermenters before being cleaned up and finished in American and French oak barrels or ‘puncheons’ of approximately 600 litres. Barossa Shiraz should be rich, spicy and suave, with hints of leather and pepper.

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Syrah/Shiraz

Syrah/Shiraz

A noble black grape variety grown particularly in the Northern Rhône where it produces the great red wines of Hermitage, Cote Rôtie and Cornas, and in Australia where it produces wines of startling depth and intensity. Reasonably low yields are a crucial factor for quality as is picking at optimum ripeness. Its heartland, Hermitage and Côte Rôtie, consists of 270 hectares of steeply terraced vineyards producing wines that brim with pepper, spices, tar and black treacle when young. After 5-10 years they become smooth and velvety with pronounced fruit characteristics of damsons, raspberries, blackcurrants and loganberries.

It is now grown extensively in the Southern Rhône where it is blended with Grenache and Mourvèdre to produce the great red wines of Châteauneuf du Pape and Gigondas amongst others. Its spiritual home in Australia is the Barossa Valley, where there are plantings dating as far back as 1860. Australian Shiraz tends to be sweeter than its Northern Rhône counterpart and the best examples are redolent of new leather, dark chocolate, liquorice, and prunes and display a blackcurrant lusciousness.

South African producers such as Eben Sadie are now producing world- class Shiraz wines that represent astonishing value for money.

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Critics reviews

The Wine Advocate99/100
Jancis Robinson MW18.5++/20
James Suckling98/100
Matthew Jukes20+/20
The Wine Advocate99/100
The 2016 Grange includes 3% Cabernet Sauvignon and was sourced from Barossa Valley, McLaren Vale and Clare Valley, with a little bit from Magill Estate, in the suburbs of Adelaide. Aged in 100% new American oak (as always), it offers up trademark lifted aromas plus scents of vanilla, toasted coconut, cedar, raspberries and blackberries. Impressively concentrated and full-bodied, with an extraordinarily long, velvety finish, it's nevertheless reasonably fresh and tight, with decades of cellaring potential if properly stored. Certainly at least on a par with such vintages as 2010 and 2012, the big question is whether it will ultimately reach triple digits.
Joe Czerwinski, robertparker.com (July 2020) Read more
Jancis Robinson MW18.5++/20
Beautifully judged fruit intensity, and fiercely tannic – all things Grange, with its thickness, spice and density. Finishes with violet scent. Ten years premature at least. So tight! But the fruit quality is bomb-proof.
Richard Hemming MW, jancisrobinson.com (September 2020) Read more
James Suckling98/100
A blend of 97% shiraz and 3% cabernet sauvignon from Barossa, McLaren Vale, Clare Valley and Magill Estate. This is a very intense Grange with such rich black-fruit, tar and coal-smoke aromas together with iodine and black-olive notes and an array of wild dark herbs. Almost impenetrable dark plums and licorice, as well as bacon fat. The palate has such seamless delivery of intense blackberry and plum flavors with some redder tones emerging, too. The power here is countered by such freshness and an almost elegant feel. This has such impressive, vibrant, long and seamless fruit power. Really is exceptionally complete, but tight, needs time to open. Very enjoyable now, but better after 2023.
James Suckling, jamessuckling.com (July 2020) Read more
Matthew Jukes20+/20
After the blunderbuss which was the 2015 vintage, we have finally arrived at another (there are a good few) slice of sheer perfection. This is such a controlled wine by comparison to its 2015 pal and over a few days and multiple tastes I made recurring flavour notes regarding the remarkable Special Bin 111A while writing about this wine. I hadn’t considered, of course, that this wine might share very similar parts, but it does! What I love about how 2016 Grange deploys its flavours is that it does it with so much grace and control for such a commanding wine. The tannins are dry and masterful, but not astringent in any way and this allows this wine to stand to attention on the palate. 2016 is an awesome vintage for Penfolds and I believe that this label is its greatest wine made in this year – as it should be. This vintage shows more intent and dynamism than I saw in the 2010 vintage, which is another of my favourites and also another of my 20/20 wines, and so there is no doubt in my mind that this vintage deserves a perfect score, too. 20+/20 (Drink 2030 – 2060)
Matthew Jukes (July 2020) Read more