2016 Scharzhof Riesling QbA, Egon Müller, Mosel, Germany

2016 Scharzhof Riesling QbA, Egon Müller, Mosel, Germany

Product: 20168016063
Prices start from £299.00 per case Buying options
2016 Scharzhof Riesling QbA, Egon Müller, Mosel, Germany

Description

Penetrating aromas and bright juiciness of apple and lemon are reinforced in their invigorating effect by the pungency and bite of raw ginger as well as a nettle-like prickle. An impression of wet stone also runs from the nose through the polished, delicate but concentrated midpalate. A luscious infusion of fresh apricot and a saliva-liberating lacing of mineral salts add appeal to an animating finish and render the next sip irresistible. I can’t recall having tasted a more impressive Scharzhof bottling, a fact that might well be directly related to the major crop losses suffered this year in Saarburg (and to a lesser extent Wiltingen), whence this cuvée is sourced. But as Veronika Lintner points out, some of this wine’s delightful sense of levity can be laid at the door of lower must weights, offering yet another example of how, inexplicably, crop loss this year to peronospora seldom resulted in prematurely elevated Oechsle. I wouldn’t hesitate to cellar some of this.

Drink 2017-2026

David Schildknecht, Vinous (Mar 2018)

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Critics reviews

Vinous90/100
Vinous90/100
Penetrating aromas and bright juiciness of apple and lemon are reinforced in their invigorating effect by the pungency and bite of raw ginger as well as a nettle-like prickle. An impression of wet stone also runs from the nose through the polished, delicate but concentrated midpalate. A luscious infusion of fresh apricot and a saliva-liberating lacing of mineral salts add appeal to an animating finish and render the next sip irresistible. I can’t recall having tasted a more impressive Scharzhof bottling, a fact that might well be directly related to the major crop losses suffered this year in Saarburg (and to a lesser extent Wiltingen), whence this cuvée is sourced. But as Veronika Lintner points out, some of this wine’s delightful sense of levity can be laid at the door of lower must weights, offering yet another example of how, inexplicably, crop loss this year to peronospora seldom resulted in prematurely elevated Oechsle. I wouldn’t hesitate to cellar some of this.

Drink 2017-2026

David Schildknecht, Vinous (Mar 2018) Read more

About this WINE

Egon Müller

Egon Müller

The Rieslings from Egon Müller are widely recognised as amongst the very best in Germany today. He has just under eight hectares of vines in the world-famous Scharzhofberg vineyard, which includes three hectares of ungrafted Riesling vines from the 19th century.

The grapes are hand-harvested and then pressed without any skin contact before being fermented in large, 1,000-litre oak casks in the natural, deep cellars. The wines are usually bottled six months later. Müller’s sweet Rieslings are arguably the finest in Mosel, while his Kabinett and Spätlese wines are fine and elegant.

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Riesling

Riesling

Riesling's twin peaks are its intense perfume and its piercing crisp acidity which it manages to retain even at high ripeness levels.

In Germany, Riesling constitutes around 20% of total plantings, yet it is responsible for all its greatest wines. It is planted widely on well-drained, south-facing slate-rich slopes, with the greatest wines coming from the best slopes in the best villages. It produces delicate, racy, nervy and stylish wines that cover a wide spectrum of flavours from steely and bone dry with beautifully scented fruits of apples,apricots, and sometimes peaches, through to the exotically sweet flavours of the great sweet wines.

It is also an important variety in Alsace where it produces slightly earthier, weightier and fuller wines than in Germany. The dry Rieslings can be austere and steely with hints of honey while the Vendages Tardives and Sélection de Grains Nobles are some of the greatest sweet wines in the world.

It is thanks to the New World that Riesling is enjoying a marked renaissance. In Australia the grape has developed a formidable reputation, delivering lime-sherbet fireworks amid the continental climate of Clare Valley an hour's drive north of Adelaide, while Barossa's Eden Valley is cooler still, producing restrained stony lime examples from the elevated granitic landscape; Tasmania is fast becoming their third Riesling mine, combining cool temperatures with high UV levels to deliver stunning prototypes.

New Zealand shares a similar climate, with Riesling and Pinot Gris neck to neck in their bid to be the next big thing after Sauvignon Blanc; perfectly suited is the South Island's Central Otago, with its granitic soils and continental climate, and the pebbly Brightwater area near Nelson. While Australia's Rieslings tend to be full-bodied & dry, the Kiwis are more inclined to be lighter bodied, more ethereal and sometimes off-dry; Alsace plays Mosel if you like.

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