2016 Brunello di Montalcino, Pianrosso, Ciacci Piccolomini d'Aragona, Tuscany, Italy

2016 Brunello di Montalcino, Pianrosso, Ciacci Piccolomini d'Aragona, Tuscany, Italy

Product: 20168209674
2016 Brunello di Montalcino, Pianrosso, Ciacci Piccolomini d'Aragona, Tuscany, Italy

Description

This single vineyard wine is a wine of pure elegance and class. A beautiful nose of forest fruits, dark cherry and plum, with an awesome minerality and a hint of fresh mushroom. The palate is fruit forward with notes of red berries and enriched spice, full-bodied, firm and silky tannins, yet balanced wonderfully by the tangy acidity. Produced only on the best vintages, 2016 is proving to be the best. A wine with spectacular potential, stash away in the cellar and reap the rewards. Drink 2022-2040
Joshua Friend – Private Account Manager

The 2016 Pianrossa displays real grace and poise on the nose. Plenty of dark fruit present, but delicately perfumed and floral, rather than being densely compact and tightly wound. There is an alluring hint of exotic spice in the background too. The palate is highly impressive. Wonderfully woven tannins create a silky mouthfeel, complemented, and perfectly balanced by fresh and juicy acidity, notes of dark cherry, milk chocolate and crushed pebbles. I am pleasantly surprised by how accessible this wine already is, but I would recommend leaving it dormant in the cellar for 2-3 years yet. There is still so much more promise to come! Drink 2023-2032.
Dominic Goddard-John, Private Account Manager

“Rich and ripe, dark cherry fruit on the nose, fabulous depth and concentration here. Fantastic on the palate, huge depth of rounded black cherry fruit, concentrated and mouth-filling, great acidity and fine tannins. That’s very fine. Drink 2023-2040+.
Chris Pollington, Private Account Manager
Read more

wine at a glance

Delivery and quality guarantee

Buying options

Available by the case In Bond. Pricing excludes duty and VAT, which must be paid separately before delivery. Find out more.
You can place a bid for this wine on BBX

About this WINE

Ciacci Piccolomini d'Aragona

Ciacci Piccolomini d'Aragona

Located in the south east of the Montalcino region close to the beautiful medieval village of Castelnuovo dell’Abate, the estate of Ciacci Piccolomini d’Aragona can trace its roots back to the 17th century. The Ciacci family owned the estate for over a hundred years until the death of Countess Elda Ciacci in 1985.

As the Countess had no children, she left the property to her long standing and well-respected estate manager Giuseppe Bianchini. His hard work and dedication have been continued by his son and daughter, Paolo and Lucia, who have developed the property and wines to their current respected position.

They have a total holding of 220 hectares of the rolling Tuscan hills bordered by the Orcia River which helps moderate the temperature of this hot and dry part of the region. 53 hectares are devoted to the wonderful Sangiovese Grosso grape which produce the Brunello di Montalcino together with small amounts of Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon.

Find out more
Brunello di Montalcino

Brunello di Montalcino

Along with Chianti, Brunello di Montalcino is Tuscany's most famous DOCG and the region's boldest expression of Sangiovese. Located 30 miles south of Siena with the hilltop town of Montalcino as its epicentre, its 2,000 hectares of vines are naturally delimited by the Orcia, Asso and Ombrone valleys. Brunello is the local name for the Sangiovese Grosso clone from which Brunello di Montalcino should be made in purezza (ie 100 percent).

The Brunello di Montalcino DOCG has a whale-like shape: at its head, at 661 metres above sea level on ancient, stony galestro soils facing east and southeast lies the town of Montalcino, where the DOC was founded. As you follow the spine south towards the tail, the vineyards lose altitude – those around Colle Sant'Angelo are at 250 metres – while the soils become richer with iron and clay. Further east, in the shadow of the 1,734 metre Mont'Amiata lies the village of Castelnuovo dell'Abate where the vineyards are strewn with a rich mix of galestro, granitic, volcanic, clay and schist soil types.

While Brunello di Montalcino's climate is mildly Mediterranean, thanks to the sea being a mere 20 miles away, the elevation of the vineyards provides an important diurnal temperature variation (ie hot days and cool nights). This benefits the grapes by maintaining acidity levels and extending their ripening time. The howling tramontana wind can also play an important role in drying and concentrating the fruit.

Historically, the zone is one of Tuscany's youngest. First praised in 1550 by Leandro Alberti for the quality of its wines, it was Tenuta Il Greppo who bottled the inaugural Brunello di Montalcino in 1888. By 1929, the region had 925 hectares of vines and 1,243 hectares of mixed crops, while in 1932 it was decreed that only those wines made and bottled within the commune could be labelled as Brunello di Montalcino. Since then, the number of producers has risen from 11 in 1960 to 230 in 2006, while over the same period the vineyards have expanded from 1,000 hectares to 12,000. The region earned its DOC in 1966, and was upgraded to DOCG in 1980.

Brunello di Montalcino cannot be released for sale until five years after the harvest, or six years in the case of Brunello di Montalcino Riserva. During this time the wines should be aged for at least two years in oak, followed by at least four months in bottle (six months for Riservas); maximum yields are 55 hl/ha. 

Rosso di Montalcino is declassified Brunello di Montalcino, released for sale 18 months after the harvest.

Recommended producers: Costanti, Fuligni, Lisini, San Giuseppe, Soldera, Cerbaiona

Find out more
Sangiovese

Sangiovese

A black grape widely grown in Central Italy and the main component of Chianti and Vino Nobile di Montepulciano as well as being the sole permitted grape for the famed Brunello di Montalcino.

It is a high yielding, late ripening grape that performs best on well-drained calcareous soils on south-facing hillsides. For years it was blighted by poor clonal selection and massive overcropping - however since the 1980s the quality of Sangiovese-based wines has rocketed upwards and they are now some of the most sought after in the world.

It produces wines with pronounced tannins and acidity, though not always with great depth of colour, and its character can vary from farmyard/leather nuances through to essence of red cherries and plums. In the 1960s the advent of Super Tuscans saw bottlings of 100% Sangiovese wines, as well as the introduction of Sangiovese/Cabernet Sauvignon blends, the most famous being Tignanello.

Find out more

Critics reviews

The Wine Advocate98/100
James Suckling98/100
Eric Guido 94/100
The Wine Advocate98/100
The Ciacci Piccolomini d'Aragona 2016 Brunello di Montalcino Pianrosso is a single-vineyard expression that draws its fruit from an 11.7-hectare parcel with moderately thick galestro soils with ancient marine material. This special site, awash under the brilliant light of a big, open sky, does indeed deliver a more pronounced mineral signature, with wild berry, rose and rosemary essence. This is a beautiful wine, taut and silky, with elegant tannins that will endure ambitious bottle aging. Drink 2024-2048.
Monica Larner, The Wine Advocate (March 2021) Read more
James Suckling98/100
Lots going on here with black plums, ripe cherries, cedar, smoke and cocoa on the nose. Ash, chocolate, crushed walnuts and some praline. Mushrooms. This has firm, ripe tannins and a full body. Flavorful and juicy finish. Very structured. Drink after 2025.
James Suckling, jamessuckling.com (March 2021) Read more
Eric Guido 94/100
Dark, rich and deeply alluring, the 2016 Brunello di Montalcino Pianrosso boasts a display of ripe black fruits encased in an air of crushed stone, sage and exotic spice. While velvety and almost creamy in texture, it finds harmony through juicy acids and a mix of ripe black cherry and plums. Hints of licorice and baker’s chocolate balance the Pianrosso’s salty minerality and fine-grained tannins through the long and dramatic finale. There’s beautiful symmetry here for a wine with such power. Place this in the cellar for ten years or more; but don’t make the mistake of not checking in from time to time, because I expect the 2016 to enjoy a long and open drinking window. Drink 2024-2034.
Eric Guido, Vinous (March 2021) Read more