2017 Bienvenues-Bâtard-Montrachet, Grand Cru, Domaine Leflaive, Burgundy

2017 Bienvenues-Bâtard-Montrachet, Grand Cru, Domaine Leflaive, Burgundy

Product: 20171132524
Prices start from £1,400.00 per case Buying options
2017 Bienvenues-Bâtard-Montrachet, Grand Cru, Domaine Leflaive, Burgundy

Description

Light fresh nose, very discreet, but nicely balanced. Very stylish, very precise, lifted, floral, juicy notes too, very subtly nuanced and then a fantastic finish. With the discreet charm of Bienvenues-Bâtard-Montrachet compared to more forceful Bâtard-Montrachet, magical detail.
97/100 points, Jasper Morris MW. Inside Burgundy (October 2018)
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3 x 75cl bottle
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About this WINE

Domaine Leflaive

Domaine Leflaive

Domaine Leflaive is the most famous estate in Puligny-Montrachet. After the untimely death of Anne-Claude Leflaive in April 2015, the estate is now being managed by Brice de la Morandiere with the winemaking under the control of Eric Remy (in succession to Pierre Morey who retired in 2008).

Leflaives have been extant in Puligny since 1717 but the real founder of the domaine was Joseph (1870-1953) who was succeeded by two of his sons, Vincent and Jo. However it was under the stewardship of Anne-Claude between 1990 and 2015 that the domaine became a leader in Burgundy’s biodynamic movement, the whole property being converted in 1997.
The wines are aged for 12 months in 25% new oak and are then transferred to steel tanks where they are allowed to clarify naturally over the second winter. They are then fined and bottled. Leflaive produces superb wines that combine richness and depth of fruit with elegance, refinement and perfect balance.

Leflaive has 22 hectares of vineyards, including 10 hectares of Premiers Crus (in Puligny Montrachet: Les Combettes, Les Pucelles, Le Clavoillon, Les Folatieres and in Meursault-Blagny, Sous le Dos d'Ane) and no fewer than 5 hectares of Grands Crus (Chevalier Montrachet, Bâtard Montrachet, Bienvenues Bâtard Montrachet and a tiny holding of Le Montrachet).

Jasper Morris MW, Burgundy Wine Director and author of the award-winning Inside Burgundy comprehensive handbook.

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Puligny Montrachet

Puligny Montrachet

Puligny was one of two villages (along with Chassagne) which gained permission in 1879 to hyphenate the name of its most famous vineyard, Montrachet, to its own.

The reputation of Puligny-Montrachet is based around its four Grands Crus. Montrachet labels often boast a noble, triumphant ‘Le’ in front of its name, lest you dare confuse it with any lesser wine. It has much to be proud of, with many considering Montrachet to be the greatest white wine in the world. At its best it has an intensity, complexity and elegance that make you wonder how such a wine could be made from mere grapes.

The luxurious and explosive Chevalier-Montrachet is not quite as deep, although it is probably the next best. Only marginally less impressive, and rather more consistent than Montrachet is the richly textured Bâtard-Montrachet (also shared with Chassagne). Bienvenues-Bâtard-Montrachet is equally good, with the focus on honeyed finesse and exquisite balance rather than richness.

These legendary wines are supported by a host of fabulous Premier Cru vineyards capable of reaching Grand Cru quality. Brimming with flavour and intensity, Le Cailleret and Les Pucelles (which both lie across the road from Le Montrachet) are prime candidates, along with Les Demoiselles, Les Combettes and Folatières.

Sandwiched between the larger Chassagne and Meursault, Puligny produces wines that are more striking than any in the Côte d’Or, portraying a floral elegance alongside a stylish, steely concentration. They are very different to Meursault: more refined and delicate, and less rich.

Village level Puligny-Montrachet from top growers can be very good indeed, but is all too often unexciting and disappointing. Grands Crus normally need at least eight years before they can be broached, and last for 20 or more. Premiers Crus should generally be enjoyed between five and 15 years of age; village wines from three to 10 years.

In theory, you can find red Puligny-Montrachet, but it scarcely exists anymore, and is rarely worth the price tag.

  • 114 hectares of village Puligny-Montrachet
  • 100 hectares of Premier Cru vineyards (17 in all). The best vineyards include Les Demoiselles, Le Cailleret, Les Pucelles, Les Combettes, Les Folatières
  • 21 hectares of Grand Cru vineyards: Le Montrachet (part), Chevalier-Montrachet, Bâtard-Montrachet (part), Bienvenues-Bâtard-Montrachet
  • Recommended Producers: LeflaiveCarillon
  • Recommended Restaurant: Le Montrachet (excellent cuisine and good wine list; also an hotel)

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Chardonnay

Chardonnay

Chardonnay is the "Big Daddy" of white wine grapes and one of the most widely planted in the world. It is suited to a wide variety of soils, though it excels in soils with a high limestone content as found in Champagne, Chablis, and the Côte D`Or.

Burgundy is Chardonnay's spiritual home and the best White Burgundies are dry, rich, honeyed wines with marvellous poise, elegance and balance. They are unquestionably the finest dry white wines in the world. Chardonnay plays a crucial role in the Champagne blend, providing structure and finesse, and is the sole grape in Blanc de Blancs.

It is quantitatively important in California and Australia, is widely planted in Chile and South Africa, and is the second most widely planted grape in New Zealand. In warm climates Chardonnay has a tendency to develop very high sugar levels during the final stages of ripening and this can occur at the expense of acidity. Late picking is a common problem and can result in blowsy and flabby wines that lack structure and definition.

Recently in the New World, we have seen a move towards more elegant, better- balanced and less oak-driven Chardonnays, and this is to be welcomed.

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Reviews

Customer reviews

Wine Advocate94-96/100
Burghound93-95/100
Tim Atkin97/100
Stephen Tanzer92-95/100
Jasper Morris MW97/100

Critic reviews

Wine Advocate94-96/100
The 2017 Bâtard-Montrachet Grand Cru unfurls in the glass with a reticent bouquet of lemon rind, citrus, hazelnut cream, white flowers and mandarin oil. On the palate, it's full-bodied, both denser and blockier than the Bienvenues-Bâtard, with exceptional concentration, tangy acids and a long finish. Today, the wine is only partially formed, but it's immensely promising. Pierre Vincent told me that it attained 12.8% natural alcohol, but despite that rather modest degree for a grand cru white Burgundy, it displays plenty of power and substance.
William Kelley, Wine Advocate (January 2019) Read more
Burghound93-95/100
From 3 different parcels, two on the Chassagne side and the third in the Puligny sector that is near the border dividing the two communes). A beautifully layered nose features notes of citrus peel, lavender, petrol, pear, white peach and soft wood nuances. There is seriously good size, weight and vibrancy to the broad-shouldered and admirably concentrated flavors that possess evident power on the serious, palate staining and strikingly long finish. If this built-to-age Bâtard can add more depth it should merit the upper end of my predicted range though note well that it’s definitely going to require patience.
Alan Meadows, Burghound (October 2019) Read more
Tim Atkin97/100
Divided into three separate parcels, two in Puligny and one in Chassagne, the Leflaive holdings in Bâtard amount to a more than satisfactory 1.5ha. Rich, concentrated and well upholstered, this is a plush, dense, palate-coating white that flirts with exotic fruit but finishes with focussed, chalky minerality. Drinking Window 2021 - 2027.
Tim Atkin MW (October 2018)
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Stephen Tanzer92-95/100
Outer quote mark Pale yellow. Less expressive on the nose than the Bienvenue, conveying a honeyed ripeness and a hint of resiny oak. Then tightly clenched in the mouth, with a penetrating orange juice flavor dominating. Not at all a fat wine, this is hard to taste today and needs time to expand. Its power suggests that it will evolve slowly.
Stephen Tanzer (September 2018)
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Jasper Morris MW97/100
Light fresh nose, very discreet, but nicely balanced. Very stylish, very precise, lifted, floral, juicy notes too, very subtly nuanced and then a fantastic finish. With the discreet charm of Bienvenues-Bâtard-Montrachet compared to more forceful Bâtard-Montrachet, magical detail.
Jasper Morris MW. Inside Burgundy (October 2018)
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