2017 Bourgogne Blanc, Domaine Antoine Jobard

2017 Bourgogne Blanc, Domaine Antoine Jobard

Product: 20171232846
Prices start from £450.00 per case Buying options
2017 Bourgogne Blanc, Domaine Antoine Jobard

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Available by the case In Bond. Pricing excludes duty and VAT, which must be paid separately before delivery. Storage charges apply.
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6 x 75cl bottle
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Description

This has a fine, rich, serious nose, with plenty of fat and fine acidity. The four original parcels have been augmented by one more, originally planted to red, right by the speed camera on the Chagny road, which was recently tarred and feathered by an unknown hand. Drink 2020-2024. 

Antoine feels that 2017 is a little less rich than 2015, but also fresher. He likes wines with body, so the freshness is a bonus, adding another dimension. He will bottle in December and January; he feels that after a warm summer, two winters in barrel is too long and earlier bottling is necessary to capture the fruit. He now wonders whether he should have bottled his 2015s sooner. Harvest began on 31st August – even for his Blagny, which used to be one of the last to ripen, indicative of the warming conditions in the region.



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About this WINE

Francois et Antoine Jobard

Francois et Antoine Jobard

This white-wine focused domaine is renowned for its steely, taut Meursault. Antoine joined his father, François, here in 2002. He assumed sole charge in ’07, after his father’s 50th vintage. Initially, any changes were minimal.

Now, there’s a clear move towards earlier bottling, with two winters in barrel no longer seen as the yardstick. This is both a stylistic choice and a response to warmer and earlier harvests.

All decisions are now taken with a view towards greater flexibility, allowing mor more or less reduction from barrel age as required.

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Bourgogne Blanc

Bourgogne Blanc


Bourgogne Blanc is the appellation used to refer to generic white wines from Burgundy, a wide term which allows 384 separate villages to produce a white wine with the label ‘Bourgogne.’ As a result of this variety, Bourgogne Blanc is very hard to characterise with a single notable style, however the wines are usually dominated by the presence of Chardonnay, which is just about the only common factor between them. That being said, Chardonnay itself varies based on the environmental factors, so every bottle of Bourgogne Blanc will vary in some way from the next! Pinot Blanc and Pinot Gris are also permitted for use in Bourgogne Blanc under the regulations of the appellation.

As Bourgogne Blanc is very much an entry-level white wine for most regions in Burgundy, prices are usually very reasonable, and due to the terroir and climate of Burgundy, Bourgogne Blanc wines tend to have a strong acidity to them, combined with a vibrant and often fruity palate when compared with other whites from the New World, say, allowing fantastic matchmaking with many different kinds of food.

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Chardonnay

Chardonnay

Chardonnay is the "Big Daddy" of white wine grapes and one of the most widely planted in the world. It is suited to a wide variety of soils, though it excels in soils with a high limestone content as found in Champagne, Chablis, and the Côte D`Or.

Burgundy is Chardonnay's spiritual home and the best White Burgundies are dry, rich, honeyed wines with marvellous poise, elegance and balance. They are unquestionably the finest dry white wines in the world. Chardonnay plays a crucial role in the Champagne blend, providing structure and finesse, and is the sole grape in Blanc de Blancs.

It is quantitatively important in California and Australia, is widely planted in Chile and South Africa, and is the second most widely planted grape in New Zealand. In warm climates Chardonnay has a tendency to develop very high sugar levels during the final stages of ripening and this can occur at the expense of acidity. Late picking is a common problem and can result in blowsy and flabby wines that lack structure and definition.

Recently in the New World, we have seen a move towards more elegant, better- balanced and less oak-driven Chardonnays, and this is to be welcomed.

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