2018 Bourgogne Blanc, Clos-du-Château, Domaine de Montille, Burgundy

2018 Bourgogne Blanc, Clos-du-Château, Domaine de Montille, Burgundy

Product: 20188012876
Prices start from £29.95 per bottle (75cl). Buying options
2018 Bourgogne Blanc, Clos-du-Château, Domaine de Montille, Burgundy

Description

This comes from the five hectares immediately in front of the château, a park until it was planted in 1986. Brian did not use any SO2 until after the malolactic fermentation, and the wine is only aged in minimum 500-litre barrels. It’s classically Puligny in style, with flinty reduction and a pure, floral, citrus profile.

Drink 2021-2026

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Critics reviews

Neal Martin, Vinous85-87/100
Wine Advocate86-88/100
Neal Martin, Vinous85-87/100
The 2018 Bourgogne Blanc comes from vineyards acquired in 2011/2012 and located near Château de Puligny-Montrachet, and is vinified in 600-liter barrels. It has a light bouquet with scents of green apple and a touch of seawater developing with aeration. The palate is steely on the entry with a fine bead of acidity. There is good tension here, and a briskly citric, lightly spiced finish.

Drink 2021 - 2024

Neal Martin, vinous.com (Jan 2020) Read more
Wine Advocate86-88/100
Friendly and enveloping, de Montille's 2018 Bourgogne Blanc Le Clos du Château bursts with aromas of orange rind, pear and musky peach, followed by a medium to full-bodied, fleshy palate. Already charming and expressive, this will drink well young.

Drink 2020 - 2026

William Kelley, Wine Advocate (Feb 2020) Read more

About this WINE

Domaine de Montille

Domaine de Montille

Domaine de Montille is a first class Côte de Beaune domaine and one which is producing some of the purest expressions of Pinot Noir to be found in Burgundy today. The domaine was developed by Hubert de Montille, a prominent Dijon lawyer, who inherited 2.5 hectares of vineyards in Volnay in 1951 and most of the production was sold in bulk to négociants. Over the years he acquired further parcels in Volnay, as well as 4 hectares in Pommard, taking his total holdings to just short of 17 hectares.

Today the domaine is run by his son Etienne. The winemaking is traditional - partial destemming followed by a relatively long maceration period. The wines are aged in oak barriques (20-30% new) and are bottled unfiltered. These are wonderfully elegant, harmonious wines that require at least five years bottle ageing to show at their very best.

The domaine has recently been considerably extended by purchases of vineyards in Beaune, Corton, and (from 2005) the Cote de Nuits, including some marvellous Vosne Romanee Les Malconsorts. There are also some fine holdings of white wine vineyards, especially Puligny Montrachet Les Caillerets.

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Burgundy

Burgundy

Burgundy never quite achieved its political ambitions of being a kingdom in its own right, but for many, the region produces some of the most regal red and white wines in the world.

In Burgundy there are 100 different appellations, numerous individual vineyards and more than 3,000 individual producers.  Around 15 million cases are produced annually from 26,500ha of vines in Burgundy, which is usually sub-divided into five regions: Chablis in the Yonne department; the Côte de Nuits and Côte de Beaune in the department of the Côte d'Or; and the Chalonnais and Mâconnais in the Saone-et-Loire.

The world's most famous white wine grape may have originated in Burgundy, where there’s a village called Chardonnay (near Mâcon). This marvellous, full-bodied grape responds well to barrel ageing and can produce wines of great complexity that can age for decades. More often than not though, in recent times, the wines are better enjoyed in their youth. The simpler white wines of Chablis to the north, and the Mâconnais in the south, are usually made in stainless steel to preserve freshness.

The heartland for white Burgundy is the Côte de Beaune with its three great villages, Meursault, Puligny-Montrachet and Chassagne-Montrachet. Here the vineyard classification system really comes into its own. On the flattest land, the wines will be classed only as generic Bourgogne Blanc; as the slope begins to rise, the wines are designated by the name of their village. At mid-slope, the finest vineyards (whose wines are bottled separately) are categorised as Premier Cru (eg Les Charmes) or Grand Cru (Le Montrachet).

Though attractive wines can be found in the Côte Chalonnais (Mercurey, Givry), the great red wines of Burgundy are found in the Côte d'Or. The line of magical villages which constitutes the Côte de Nuits, Gevrey-Chambertin, Morey-St Denis, Chambolle-Musigny, Vougeot, Vosne-Romanée and Nuits-St Georges is practically a roll call of great names. The Côte de Beaune competes through such gems as Volnay and Pommard, which are adjacent yet contrasting villages: lacy elegance for the wines of Volnay, while sturdy and more structured in those from Pommard.

Whereas Burgundy used to be considered a veritable minefield because of the complexity of choice, these days it is more of a playground for the adventurous wine lover, thanks to the vast increase in number of quality-conscious, properly-trained producers.

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Chardonnay

Chardonnay

Chardonnay is the "Big Daddy" of white wine grapes and one of the most widely planted in the world. It is suited to a wide variety of soils, though it excels in soils with a high limestone content as found in Champagne, Chablis, and the Côte D`Or.

Burgundy is Chardonnay's spiritual home and the best White Burgundies are dry, rich, honeyed wines with marvellous poise, elegance and balance. They are unquestionably the finest dry white wines in the world. Chardonnay plays a crucial role in the Champagne blend, providing structure and finesse, and is the sole grape in Blanc de Blancs.

It is quantitatively important in California and Australia, is widely planted in Chile and South Africa, and is the second most widely planted grape in New Zealand. In warm climates Chardonnay has a tendency to develop very high sugar levels during the final stages of ripening and this can occur at the expense of acidity. Late picking is a common problem and can result in blowsy and flabby wines that lack structure and definition.

Recently in the New World, we have seen a move towards more elegant, better- balanced and less oak-driven Chardonnays, and this is to be welcomed.

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