2019 Inglenook, Blancaneaux, Rutherford, Napa Valley, California, USA

2019 Inglenook, Blancaneaux, Rutherford, Napa Valley, California, USA

Product: 20198053684
Prices start from £234.00 per case Buying options
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2019 Inglenook, Blancaneaux, Rutherford, Napa Valley, California, USA

Description

Aromas of lemon curd, dried flowers, apricot and toast on the nose. It’s medium-to full-bodied with tangy acidity and a waxy texture. Almonds, waxed lemon and stones on the finish. Viognier, marsanne and roussanne. Drink now.

James Suckling, jamessuckling.com (Feb 2021)

This wine will be delivered by Spring 2022

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Available by the case In Bond. Pricing excludes duty and VAT, which must be paid separately before delivery. Find out more.
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Case format
Availability
Price per case
6 x 75cl bottle
Berry Bros. & Rudd BB&R 3 cases £234.00
En Primeur Limited availability
En Primeur Limited availability

Critics reviews

Jane Anson95/100
James Suckling92/100
Jane Anson95/100
Always a white wine that I love, and that has a real sense of vibrancy and pleasure. This is a Rhone blend from the Napa, absolutely packed full of pleasure; white pepper spice, a ton of freshly cut herbs, citrus, apricot, peach pit, those slightly bitter stone fruits that keep focus and tension. 8 months on the lees, 60% stainless steel, 40% French oak, 22% new

Drink 2021 - 2028

Jane Anson, Decanter.com (Sept 2021) Read more
James Suckling92/100
Aromas of lemon curd, dried flowers, apricot and toast on the nose. It’s medium-to full-bodied with tangy acidity and a waxy texture. Almonds, waxed lemon and stones on the finish. Viognier, marsanne and roussanne. Drink now.

James Suckling, jamessuckling.com (Feb 2021) Read more

About this WINE

Inglenook

Inglenook

Inglenook was established in the top-rated Rutherford appellation in Napa Valley in 1879 by a Finnish sea captain, Gustave Niebaum. After a chequered history, which included the winery shutting down during prohibition, the estate regained its original reputation for producing very fine wine during the 1940s when it was owned by John Daniel.

In 1975 film director Francis Ford Coppola purchased the majority of the acreage under vine, using his profits from The Godfather films. He named the wines made during his ownership Niebaum Coppola, and in 1995 purchased the totality of the estate.

Finally, in 2008, Coppola was able to purchase the trademark of Inglenook, and announced that from that moment onwards the wines would all once again be known by their original name of Inglenook. The first such release was the 2008 vintage. The consulting oenologist here is the celebrated Stephane Derenencourt, who has done so much to refine the production in a clutch of top-class Bordeaux chateaux.

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White Rhône Blend

White Rhône Blend

With the exception of the wines from Condrieu and Château-Grillet virtually all Rhône Valley whites are made from blends.

In the north, the white wines of Hermitage, Crozes-Hermitage, St-Joseph, and St-Péray are produced from blends of Marsanne and Roussanne. Generally Marsanne is the dominant partner and it lends colour, body and weight to the blend, as well as richly scented fruit. Roussanne, a notoriously low yielder and pernickety to grow, produces intensely aromatic wines which contribute bouquet, delicacy and finesse to the blend.

Until about 15 years ago there was very little interest in southern Rhône whites as it was widely believed that the combination of dull non aromatic grapes and the baking summer heat meant quality wine production was nigh impossible. Since then the quality has improved markedly through the introduction of cool fermentation techniques and increased plantings of northern Rhône white grapes.

The base of many blends is still Grenache Blanc, a widely planted variety producing fresh wines with apple-like fruits, often with hints of aniseed. Ugni Blanc is still found in many blends, as is Clairette though their general lack of character and definition has led to a reduction in plantings. The future for southern Rhône whites appears to lie with Roussanne, Marsanne, and, increasingly, Viognier.

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