2019 Corton, Perrières, Grand Cru, Domaine Dubreuil-Fontaine, Burgundy 

2019 Corton, Perrières, Grand Cru, Domaine Dubreuil-Fontaine, Burgundy 

Product: 20198171377
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2019 Corton, Perrières, Grand Cru, Domaine Dubreuil-Fontaine, Burgundy 

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Description

Save 10% on the 75cl bottle, previously priced at £63.50. Offer valid while stocks last. BBX listings excluded.

The 2019 Corton-Perrières Grand Cru has a dense, opulent bouquet of black cherries, cassis and touches of cinnamon. The palate is medium-bodied with supple tannins, and less mineral than previous vintages. The warmth of alcohol (15.3° – the highest of the domaine’s) is noticeable on the finish, albeit not as overpowering as that figure might imply. I will be perhaps unfairly cautious with my score because I would like to see how this turns out in bottle.

Drink 2024 - 2039

Neal Martin, Vinous.com (December 2020)

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Critics reviews

Jasper Morris MW87-91/100

Rich crimson with a dark centre. It has quite a heady nose, sufficiently so to hide the detail. Corton Perrières is a tough terroir never likely to make a wine of finesse, and the high alcohol (14.7%) makes this a little brutal. Thick tannins are behind and showing the alcohol now, though age will soften this.

Jasper Morris MW, InsideBurgundy.com (October 2020)

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Burghound92/100

From a .60 ha parcel

The spicy and earthy purple fruit aromas contain moderate amounts of wood and menthol. The delicious, well-detailed, and relatively refined mid-palate texture of the medium-bodied flavours contrasts somewhat with the austere, firm, and mineral-driven finish that displays fine length.

Drink from 2029 onward

Allen Meadows, Burghound.com (April 2021)

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Neal Martin, Vinous89-91/100

The 2019 Corton-Perrières Grand Cru has a dense, opulent bouquet of black cherries, cassis and touches of cinnamon. The palate is medium-bodied with supple tannins, and less mineral than previous vintages. The warmth of alcohol (15.3° – the highest of the domaine’s) is noticeable on the finish, albeit not as overpowering as that figure might imply. I will be perhaps unfairly cautious with my score because I would like to see how this turns out in bottle.

Drink 2024 - 2039

Neal Martin, Vinous.com (December 2020)

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About this WINE

Domaine Dubreuil-Fontaine

Domaine Dubreuil-Fontaine

Domaine Dubreuil-Fontaine is situated in the heart of the Côte de Beaune, in Burgundy, known for producing some of the world’s finest Chardonnay and Pinot Noir wines.

The domaine has a long and storied history that dates back to the 18th century when the Dubreuil family founded it. In 1985, Christine Dubreuil took over the estate and has played a significant role in modernising and elevating winemaking practices.

Several vineyards are operated across the estate in some of the most prestigious appellations in Burgundy, including Pernand Vergelesses, Corton, and Pommard. These are planted with Chardonnay and Pinot Noir grapes, the primary varietals used in Burgundy wine production.

The winemaking philosophy at Domaine Dubreuil-Fontaine emphasises traditional and meticulous techniques. They focus on terroir expression, which involves careful attention to the specific characteristics of each vineyard. The use of oak barrels for ageing is standard, emphasising using French oak to impart subtle flavours and textures to the wines.

The domaine produces a range of Burgundy wines, both white and red. These wines often showcase the elegance, finesse, and complexity typical of Burgundian Chardonnay and Pinot Noir. Some of their notable cuvées may include Premier Cru and Grand Cru wines from renowned appellations like Corton-Charlemagne, Pommard, and Aloxe-Corton.

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Corton-Charlemagne

Corton-Charlemagne

There are two specific Charlemagne vineyards, En Charlemagne and Le Charlemagne, making up half the Corton-Charlemagne appellation, while white grapes grown in seven other vineyards (see list below) may also be sold as Corton-Charlemagne. As a result there can be a wide divergence in style between a south-facing location such as Pougets, which needs picking right at the start of the harvest, and the western slopes in Pernand-Vergelesses which might be picked several weeks later. The underlying similarity though comes from the minerality of the soil.

En Charlemagne lies at the border with Aloxe-Corton. The hillside faces west and fine, racy white wines can be made, but the Grand Cru appellation has been extended right up to the village of Pernand itself, by which time the exposition is north-west and the valley has become noticeably more enclosed. The final sector was only promoted in 1966, and probably should not have been.

Le Charlemagne is the absolute heartland of the appellation, facing south-west, thus avoiding the risk of over-ripeness which can afflict the vines exposed due south. If I had Corton-Charlemagne vines here I would be tempted to let the world know by labelling the wine as Corton-Charlemagne, Le Charlemagne.

Two producers to my knowledge also have some Pinot Noir planted here – Follin-Arbelet and Bonneau du Martray. Both make attractive wines but neither, to my mind, justifies Grand Cru status for red wine, lacking the extra dimensions of flavour one hopes for at the highest level. This is not the producers’ fault, but a reflection of the terroir.

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Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir is probably the most frustrating, and at times infuriating, wine grape in the world. However when it is successful, it can produce some of the most sublime wines known to man. This thin-skinned grape which grows in small, tight bunches performs well on well-drained, deepish limestone based subsoils as are found on Burgundy's Côte d'Or.

Pinot Noir is more susceptible than other varieties to over cropping - concentration and varietal character disappear rapidly if yields are excessive and yields as little as 25hl/ha are the norm for some climats of the Côte d`Or.

Because of the thinness of the skins, Pinot Noir wines are lighter in colour, body and tannins. However the best wines have grip, complexity and an intensity of fruit seldom found in wine from other grapes. Young Pinot Noir can smell almost sweet, redolent with freshly crushed raspberries, cherries and redcurrants. When mature, the best wines develop a sensuous, silky mouth feel with the fruit flavours deepening and gamey "sous-bois" nuances emerging.

The best examples are still found in Burgundy, although Pinot Noir`s key role in Champagne should not be forgotten. It is grown throughout the world with notable success in the Carneros and Russian River Valley districts of California, and the Martinborough and Central Otago regions of New Zealand.

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