2020 Las Uvas de la Ira, Daniel Gómez Jiménez-Landi, Méntrida, Spain

2020 Las Uvas de la Ira, Daniel Gómez Jiménez-Landi, Méntrida, Spain

Product: 20208103725
Place a bid
Prices start from £216.00 per case Buying options
2020 Las Uvas de la Ira, Daniel Gómez Jiménez-Landi, Méntrida, Spain

Buying options

Available by the case In Bond. Pricing excludes duty and VAT, which must be paid separately before delivery. Storage charges apply.
Case format
Availability
Price per case
12 x 75cl bottle
Berry Bros. & Rudd BB&R 12 cases £216.00
En Primeur Limited availability
En Primeur Limited availability
You can place a bid for this wine on BBX
Place a bid

Description

The grapes for the village red El Real De San Vicente 2020 Las Uvas de la Ira were picked before the abundant rains of mid-September, as it's a warmer place than other villages in Gredos, and the wine has a little more the character of a ripe year (it reached 15% alcohol) with tons of spices, wild berries, herbs and flowers with a note of pollen. Picking the grapes before the rain in Real del San Vicente was the right decision, and they consider the single-vineyard Cantos del Diablo (which unfortunately I didn't get to taste) as the best vintage for that wine so far. This is medium-bodied and balanced, with very fine grainy tannins.

Drink 2021 - 2026

Luis Gutiérrez, Wine Advocate (Nov 2021)

wine at a glance

Delivery and quality guarantee

Critics reviews

Wine Advocate93/100

The grapes for the village red El Real De San Vicente 2020 Las Uvas de la Ira were picked before the abundant rains of mid-September, as it's a warmer place than other villages in Gredos, and the wine has a little more the character of a ripe year (it reached 15% alcohol) with tons of spices, wild berries, herbs and flowers with a note of pollen. Picking the grapes before the rain in Real del San Vicente was the right decision, and they consider the single-vineyard Cantos del Diablo (which unfortunately I didn't get to taste) as the best vintage for that wine so far. This is medium-bodied and balanced, with very fine grainy tannins.

Drink 2021 - 2026

Luis Gutiérrez, Wine Advocate (Nov 2021)

Read more
Jancis Robinson MW17/20

Pale strawberry colour. SO sweet but utterly charming and gorgeous! Pure flattery. And the sweetness is matched by acid and structure. Like a soft down pillow to sink into.

Drink 2022 - 2027

Jancis Robinson MW, jancisrobinson.com (Apr 2022)

Read more
Decanter94/100

Essential to include a wine from Daniel Landi, who did so much to launch Garnacha. ‘The Grapes of Wrath’ is a blend of the ethereal and the earthy. Aged in very large foudres.

Drink 2022 - 2026

Sarah Jane Evans MW, Decanter (Mar 2022)

Read more

About this WINE

Daniel Landi

Daniel Landi

Find out more
Grenache/Garnacha

Grenache/Garnacha

Grenache (Noir) is widely grown and comes in a variety of styles. Believed to originate in Spain, it was, in the late 20th century, the most widely planted black grape variety in the world. Today it hovers around seventh in the pecking order. It tends to produce very fruity, rich wines that can range quite widely in their level of tannin.

In many regions – most famously the Southern Rhône, where it complements Syrah and Mourvèdre, among other grapes – it adds backbone and colour to blends, but some of the most notable Châteauneuf du Pape producers (such as Château Rayas) make 100 percent Grenache wines. The grape is a component in many wines of the Languedoc (where you’ll also find its lighter-coloured forms, Grenache Gris and Blanc) and is responsible for much southern French rosé – taking the lead in most Provence styles.

Found all over Spain as Garnacha Tinta (spelt Garnaxa in Catalonia), the grape variety is increasingly detailed on wine labels there. Along with Tempranillo, it forms the majority of the blend for Rioja’s reds and has been adopted widely in Navarra, where it produces lighter styles of red and rosado (rosé). It can also be found operating under a pseudonym, Cannonau, in Sardinia.

 

Beyond Europe, Grenache is widely planted in California and Australia, largely thanks to its ability to operate in high temperatures and without much water. Particularly in the Barossa Valley, there are some extraordinary dry-farmed bush vines, some of which are centuries old and produce wines of startling intensity.

Find out more