Red, Ready, but will keep

2012 Elderton Western Ridge Grenache/ Carignan, Barossa Valley

2012 Elderton Western Ridge Grenache/ Carignan, Barossa Valley

Red | Ready, but will keep | Elderton | Code:  24509 | 2012 | Australia > South Australia > Barossa Valley | Other Varieties | Medium Bodied, Dry | 14.5 % alcohol

Prices: 

Please note:

Wines sold "In Bond" (including BBX) or “En Primeur” are not available for immediate delivery and storage charges may apply.

Duty and VAT must be paid separately before delivery can take place.

See All Listings

Scores and Reviews

WA

92/100

WA - Pale to medium garnet-purple in color, the 2012 Western Ridge Grenache Carignan presents aromas of kirsch, red currants and red plums intermingling with a spicy undercurrent. Medium-bodied, youthful and tightly structured by medium levels of soft tannins, it is quite pure, fresh and lively through the surprisingly elegant, long finish.
Drink it now to 2020+.
Lisa Perrotti-Brown, The Wine Advocated. 27th Feb 2014. 

The Producer

Elderton

Elderton

Elderton was established in 1984 by Neil Ashmead - it is now run by Allister and Cameron Ashmead.

The winery is located on the banks of the Barossa Valley`s North Para River just outside the town of Nuriootpa. The fruit is drawn from 31 hectares of high-quality vineyards in the Barossa Valley. Aged between 40 and 102 years old, coupled with minimal irrigation, the vines produce rich, concentrated fruit showing off classic varietal flavours.

Its flagship wine is the Command Shiraz, which is made from small parcels of vines planted in 1939 and 1947. It is matured in American oak puncheons for 24 months and is one of the richest and concentrated examples of Barossa Shiraz to be found today.

Elderton released Tantalus to provide an easy drinking style of premium red at an every day drinking price. Tantalus was a figure from Greek Mythology who was punished for offending the Gods by being kept perpetually thirsty and hungry but tantalised by water and fruit he could see, but not quite reach.

The Grape

Other Varieties

Other Varieties

There are over 200 different grape varieties used in modern wine making (from a total of over 1000). Most lesser known blends and varieties are traditional to specific parts of the world.

The Region

Barossa Valley

Barossa Valley

Barossa Valley is the South Australia's wine industry's birthplace. Currently into its fifth generation, it dates back to 1839 when George Fife Angas’ South Australian Company purchased 28,000 acres at a £1 per acre and sold them onto landed gentry, mostly German Lutherans. The first vines were planted in 1843 in Bethany, and by the 1870s – with Europe ravaged by war and Phylloxera - Gladstone’s British government complemented its colonies with preferential duties.

Fortified wines, strong enough to survive the 20,000km journey, flooded the British market. Churchill followed, between the Wars, re-affirming Australia’s position as a leading supplier of ‘Empire wines’. After the Second World War, mass European immigration saw a move to lighter wines, as confirmed by Grange Hermitage’s creation during the 1950s. Stainless-steel vats and refrigeration improved the quality of the dry table wines on offer, with table wine consumption exceeding fortified for the first time in 1970.

Averaging 200 to 400 metres’ altitude, the region covers 6,500 hectares of mainly terra rossa loam over limestone, as well as some warmer, sandier sites – the Cambrian limestone being far more visible along the eastern boundary (the Barossa Ranges) with Eden Valley. Following a diagonal shape, Lyndoch at the southern end nearest Gulf St Vincent is the region’s coolest spot, benefiting from sea fogs, while Nuriootpa (further north) is warmer; hot northerlies can be offset by sea breezes. The region is also home to the country’s largest concentration of 100-year-old-vine ShirazGrenache and Mourvedre.

Barossa Valley Shiraz is one of the country’s most identifiable and famous red wine styles, produced to a high quality by the likes of Rockford, Elderton, Torbreck and Dean Hewitson. Grenache and Mourvèdre are two of the region’s hidden gems, often blended with Shiraz, yet occasionally released as single vineyard styles such as Hewitson’s ‘Old Garden’, whose vines date back to 1853. Cabernet Sauvignon is a less highly-regarded cultivar.

Wines are traditionally vinified in open concrete fermenters before being cleaned up and finished in American and French oak barrels or ‘puncheons’ of approximately 600 litres. Barossa Shiraz should be rich, spicy and suave, with hints of leather and pepper.

Customer Reviews
Questions And Answers