Berrys' Dry Oloroso, Sanlúcar de Barrameda

Berrys' Dry Oloroso, Sanlúcar de Barrameda

Product: 25043
 
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Berrys' Dry Oloroso, Sanlúcar de Barrameda

Description

I have to confess to having something of a Sherry habit, and was mortified when my chosen Berry Bros. & Rudd example was briefly unavailable earlier this year. Salvation is at hand, with the recently-arrived new incarnation of this favourite, arguably more classically formed and profound than ever. Sherry is probably the most under-valued fine wine in the world (very fortunate, as I average a bottle a week – or thereabouts), with levels of complexity and persistence that would command a ten-fold increase in price were they sourced from Bordeaux or Burgundy. Berry Bros. & Rudd Dry Oloroso has a nose suggestive of something sweet, with its notes of walnuts and dried fruit, so the lack of sweetness on the palate is initially something of a shock.  As the layers of flavour unfold in your mouth, this is clearly a very different wine from a more commercial sweetened cream Sherry.  In addition to the nuts and raisined-depth, there is a haunting toffee-sweetness on the palate of this dry wine.  The finish persists for an age.

When to drink this gem: before dinner with some salted almonds or olives works, as does afterwards, with some walnuts. Oloroso is also surprisingly good with robust meat dishes. The oxidative aging on this wine means that, unlike Fino or Manzanilla – which should be consumed within a day or so of opening – this wine will continue to give pleasure for up to a week after first being broached.
Martin Hudson MW
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About this WINE

Palomino Fino

Palomino Fino

Palomino, named after Fernan Yanez Palomonio, one of King Alfonso X`s knights, is the primary grape variety for Sherry styles (Fino, Manzanilla, Amontillado, Oloroso, Palo Cortado) production.

It is a high yielding variety that is widely planted in Spain producing mostly insipid thin, dull wines lacking in fruit and acidity. However it thrives on the predominantly chalk based soils of Cadiz  where it produces large bunches of golden yellow grapes, which ripen in early September. The resulting must is transparent in colour and somewhat neutral in flavour, but the subsequent wine can develop a coating of flor before maturing in the solera system and produce a whole range of intense and aromatic sherries.

It is also grown in South Africa, California, and Australia where it is fortified to make sherry-style wines.

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