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2012 Crama Ceptura, Feteasca Neagra, Prahova, Romania

2012 Crama Ceptura, Feteasca Neagra, Prahova, Romania

Red | Drink now | Crama Ceptura | Code:  27568 | 2012 | Romania | Feteasca Neagra | Medium Bodied, Dry | 13.5 % alcohol

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Scores and Reviews

WS - The 2012 Crama Ceptura Feteascã Neagrã from Romania was completely new to me, sourced by Martin Hudson MW, the Berrys buyer responsible ‘for some of the less obvious corners of the world’, as he puts it. Romania has a proud history of winemaking, of course, and I discover that Feteascã Neagrã (aka Black Maiden) is a well-established red grape variety there. The wine is oak-aged, rich and ripe with juicy plummy fruit and a spicy edge to it, perfect winter fare in fact. It’s different all right and quite delicious too.
Jonathan Ray - Wine Spectator - Feb 2013

The Producer

Crama Ceptura

Crama Ceptura

Crama Ceptura is a sister company to Purcari of Moldova. The very modern winery (2004) is in the village of Ceptura, the vineyards are on predominantly south-east facing slopes in the foothills of the Carpathian mountains, in the famous Dealu Mare region north of Bucharest. The vineyards grow both indigenous (esp. Feteasca Regala and Feteasca Neagra ) and international varietals, in this, Romania’s warmest viticultural region.

The Grape

Feteasca Neagra

Feteasca Neagra

Feteasca Neagra is an old grape variety that originated in Moldavia, producing wines of an almost Italian character, with red plum fruit, fresh acidity and ripe but firm tannins, and an intriguing spice note on the finish. The name means “Black Maiden”. This wine would suit meat based pasta dishes and charcuterie.

The Region

Romania

Romania

Romania has had a long history of wine-making, the Dacians pre-dating both Greek and Roman civilisations. Wine-making flourished under the Roman occupation and the early middle ages, but was limited when Wallachia and Moldavia came under the influence of the Ottoman Empire, although Transylvania remained independent.  Romania as an integrated and independent country came into being in 1878, and thereafter, particularly in the lead up to the first world war looked to France both culturally and politically, resulting in extensive planting of French varieties after the ravages of phylloxera. 

The wine industry suffered from the depression between the wars and was taken into state control with the emergence of the communist regime in the late 1940s.  The focus during the communist years was on quantity rather than quality, this only changing gradually after the revolution of 1989 and the liberalisation that allowed EU membership in 2007. 

The wine industry in Romania has recently benefitted from overseas investment and technology transfer, but has also looked back to the indigenous grapes that made its reputation in the 19thC and early 20thC.  Figures for 2012 rank it 13th in the wine producing countries of the world, making nearly double the volume of New Zealand.

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