Red, Drink now

2014 Mullineux Kloof Street Red, Swartland, South Africa

2014 Mullineux Kloof Street Red, Swartland, South Africa

Red | Drink now | Mullineux & Leeu Family Wines | Code:  38911 | 2014 | South Africa > Swartland | Other Varieties | Medium-Full Bodied, Dry | 13.5 % alcohol

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The Producer

Mullineux & Leeu Family Wines

Mullineux & Leeu Family Wines

Mullineux and Leeu Family Wines is one of the stand-out producers in South Africa's budding Swartland region. Winemakers Chris and Andrea Mullineux’s ambition is to bottle wines that are a true expression of the Swartland, and all steps of their winemaking process are taken with this in mind. They work closely with a select group of growers who follow sustainable, reasoned farming practices.

In the cellar, apart from minimal amounts of sulphur, nothing is added to or removed from the wine. They do not make use of any yeasts, acids, tannins, enzymes, or fining and filtering agents. ‘Leeu’ (Afrikaans for ‘lion’) was added to the name recently to recognise the contribution of a new investor to the project.

Apart from their wonderful Syrah, Chenin blanc-based white blend and a super rich Straw Wine made from air dried Chenin Blanc, fermented and matured in old barriques, Mullineux now have a range of spectacular single vineyard Shiraz and Chenin Blanc wines, each of which illustrates the amazing potential of the Swartland terroir. Volumes of the single vineyard wines are tiny, so availability is extremely limited.

The Grape

Other Varieties

Other Varieties

There are over 200 different grape varieties used in modern wine making (from a total of over 1000). Most lesser known blends and varieties are traditional to specific parts of the world.

The Region

Swartland

Swartland

After Stellenbosch, t, the west coast district of Swartland (25 miles due north of Cape Town, between the towns of Malmesbury and Piketberg) now ranks as the Cape's most exciting wine-producing district.

Settled initially by nomadic Khoikhoi from Namibia, the Dutch brought trade, vines and unrest to the region in the 17th century.

The British then transformed the area into the Cape's bread basket, viticulture being developed only more recently. This contrasts with an ancient geology which has brought a mix of shale, arenite sandstone and granite soils air-conditioned by the Atlantic Ocean nearby.

Chenin Blanc and Shiraz seem to do best, as exemplified by the wines of Eben Sadie and Mullineux.

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