Red, Ready, but will improve

2016 Moulin à Vent, Les Rouchaux, Domaine Louis Boillot

2016 Moulin à Vent, Les Rouchaux, Domaine Louis Boillot

Red | Ready, but will improve | Louis Boillot | Code:  49417 | 2016 | France > Beaujolais > Moulin a Vent | Gamay | Medium-Full Bodied, Dry | 13.0 % alcohol

Prices: 

Scores and Reviews

The Wine Advocate

93/100

The Wine Advocate - The 2016 Moulin--Vent Les Rouchaux offers up scents of juicy cherries, cassis, rose petal and espresso roast, delicately framed by a subtle hint of recently used wood. On the palate, it's medium to full-bodied, broad and velvety, with excellent depth and dimension at the core, ripe acids and powdery tannins. This is an unqualified success for Boillot.
William Kelley - 30/04/2019

The Producer

Louis Boillot

Louis Boillot

Louis Boillot has come to Chambolle, where his partner Ghislaine Barthod is based, from Gevrey-Chambertin, though as his range of wines indicates, he is descended from the Volnay family of Boillots. Louis uses his vast wine experience and knowledge to secure parcels of the finest quality for his négociant business, Maison Louis Boillot. Combined with this local knowledge and his talented winemaking skills, he strives to produce some of the best wines of Gevrey-Chambertin and Chambolle-Musigny.

He was formerly associated with his brother and father at Domaine Lucien Boillot, but set up on his own from the 2003 vintage. The wines made now in Chambolle are significantly more interesting than those produced previously in Gevrey.

The vines are ploughed then run according to lutte raisonnée. The grapes are sorted in the vineyard, 100% destalked, given a cool pre-fermentation maceration, fermented then sent to barrel once the juice is cool again. 20-30% new wood is used across the whole range, with an élévage of 16-18 months before bottling without fining or filtration.
 
The domaine may suffer from the lack of geographical cohesion of the vineyard holdings, especially in contrast to Ghislaine Barthod’s concentration on Chambolle-Musigny. Their son Clément Boillot-Barthod is going to inherit quite a substantial combination one day.

Jasper Morris MW, Burgundy Wine Director and author of the award-winning Inside Burgundy comprehensive handbook.

The Grape

Gamay

Gamay

A French variety planted predominately in Beaujolais where it is the grape behind everything from light and often acidic Beaujolais Nouveau through to the more serious and well-structured wines from the 10 cru villages. It takes its name from a hamlet just outside Chassagne-Montrachet and was at one stage widely planted on the Côte d`Or. However it was gradually phased out due to its poor yield and supposed poor quality of its wines.

The majority of Gamay wines in Beaujolais are labelled as Beaujolais or Beaujolais-Villages and are deliciously juicy, easy drinking, gulpable wines. Of more interest are the Cru wines from the 10 villages in the north of the region where the soil is predominantly granitic schist and where the vines are planted on gently undulating slopes. These can be well-structured, intensely perfumed wines, redolent of ripe black fruits and, while delicious young, will reward medium term cellaring.

Gamay is also grown in the Touraine region of the Loire where it produces soft, well-balanced, gluggable wines for drinking young.

The Region

Moulin a Vent

Moulin a Vent

Known as the ‘King of Beaujolais’ for its power, structure and longevity, Moulin-à-Vent is the most atypical of all the Beaujolais Crus, even if it is potentially the best. Its style is the antithesis of light, fluffy Beaujolais, and when fully mature (often at 10 years old or more) it resembles more a fine Burgundy, or even a Rhône, than Beaujolais. Named after the local windmill (which translates as moulin-à-vent in French) Moulin-à-Vent is a real vindication of the principle of ‘terroir’. 

Moulin-à-Vent's neighbour Fleurie produces perfumed, silky, approachable wines, while Moulin-à-Vent, using the same grape (100% Gamay) and broadly the same vinification, makes wines that are meaty, tannic and intense, and need 2-3 years to mature.  The only possible explanation, it seems, is the high proportion of iron and manganese in Moulin-à-Vent’s soil. Moulin-à-Vent tends to be most expensive of the Beaujolais Crus, although happily it is home to a number of very fine producers, so there is plenty for wine lovers to choose from.

Recommended producers: Jacky Janodet, Olivier Merlin.

Customer Reviews
Questions And Answers