2010 Barbaresco, Crichët Pajé, Roagna, Piedmont, Italy

2010 Barbaresco, Crichët Pajé, Roagna, Piedmont, Italy

Product: 20108003302
Prices start from £3,500.00 per case Buying options
2010 Barbaresco, Crichët Pajé, Roagna, Piedmont, Italy

Description

Alfredo and Luca chose not to release “CP” in the 2009 vintage, as they felt the quality was not there. Skip forward then from 2008 to 2010. From the sunniest, sought-after corner of the Pajè vineyard, old vines that produce achingly small yields, vinified in a single 20-hectolitre botte and aged for eight years prior to release; the 2010 expression brims with late-harvest, dried tamarind fruit. It is tightly woven, with a “block” of dark cherry spirit, rich with decadent gelato and currant fruit. It’s hedonistic but racy too. Drink now to 2045+.
Davy yw, Wine Buyer
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Price per case
3 x 75cl bottle
BBX marketplace BBX 1 case £3,500.00
Original Wooden Case
Original Wooden Case
1 x 150cl magnum
BBX marketplace BBX 1 case £2,750.00
1 x 300cl double magnum
BBX marketplace BBX 1 case £5,750.00
Original Wooden Case
Original Wooden Case

Critics reviews

Wine Advocate98/100
Wine Advocate98/100
The iconic 2010 Barbaresco Cricht Paj doesnt have Roagnas name on the front label (other than a signature in script). Instead, the wine is recognized by its artwork featuring an image of workers on a labor strike with some political meaning. Luca Roagnas grandfather bought these vines in 1953, and the first official vintage made was 1978 (even though a handful of experimental 1977 bottles may conceivably be spotted once in a blue moon). Most of the vines today are 80 years old. Lucas father wanted to create a revolutionary wine (hence the political artwork on the font label) that would represent a break from classic Barbaresco. The idea was to create a Barbaresco designed for long cellar aging, just like its nearby cousin, Barolo. Indeed, the first thing you notice about this expression from 2010 is that the tannic structure needs more time to soften. Thats remarkable given that this wine has already completed anywhere from eight to ten (depending on the vintage) years of barrel aging. Cricht Paj is not an officially recognized MGA cru; however, it is a single vineyard (measuring about half a hectare) planted on softly rolling hills that form an enclosed little amphitheater.
Monica Larner - 28/06/2019 Read more

About this WINE

Roagna, Piedmont

Roagna, Piedmont

Luca Roagna represents the latest generation to work in this historical wine estate, alongside his genial father Alfredo, whose 15 hectares of vine cover both Barbaresco and Barolo wine production. However the family's roots lie in Barbaresco, with Luca's grandfather buying the Paje vineyard in the 1950s.

The key to understanding Roagna's wine is their insistence upon biodiverse masale selected and old vineyards (up to 100 year-old in the case of Castiglione Falletto), whose plants are only green harvested up to 15 yo (older vines set their own yields naturally). Harvests tend to be more protracted than their neighbours, while cuvaisons in large conical French Garbellotto botte also outstrip the norm, lasting anything from one to two months, achieving the finest tannins and maximum extraction. The use of sulphur dioxide is minimal if applied at regular intervals.

The range is dominated by three Barbaresco crus: Paje, Crichet Paje and Paje Riserva; the difference being the exposition and vine age. Not afraid to innovate, since 1982 they have also offered an ingenious non-vintage, vino di tavola blend of (Barbaresco) Nebbiolo called 'Opera Prima' and since '88 a minerally white Chardonnay/Nebbiolo blend named 'Solea'.

From Barolo's Castiglione Falletto village comes their monopole and ancient vine 'La Rocca e Le Pira' cru, while more recently (from '93) comes Serralunga d'Alba's prime Vigna Rionda. Production is small; the 10,000 cases potential reduced to an average 6,000 case reality. In a word: finezza.

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Barbaresco

Barbaresco

The Piedmontese DOCG zone of Barbaresco is responsible for producing some of Italy’s finest wines. It occupies the same region and uses the same grape (Nebbiolo) as its bigger brother Barolo, but is a third of the size (only 640 hectares versus Barolo’s 1,700 hectares). It is also 50 years younger than Barolo, having produced wine labelled Barbaresco since 1890.

Barbaresco earned its DOCG after Barolo in 1980, largely thanks to the efforts of Angelo Gaja. The soils are lighter here than in Barolo – both in colour and weight – and more calcareous. The slopes are also less favourably situated and (relatively speaking) yield earlier-maturing yet extremely elegant wines that require less oak ageing (normally one year in oak plus six months in bottle). The appellation’s key districts are Barbaresco, Treiso, Neive and Alba.

Recommended producers: Cigliuti, Gaja, Marchesi di Gresy

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Nebbiolo

Nebbiolo

Nebbiolo is the grape behind the Barolo and Barbaresco wines and is hardly ever seen outside the confines of Piedmont. It takes its name from "nebbia" which is Italian for fog, a frequent phenomenon in the region.

A notoriously pernickety grape, it requires sheltered south-facing sites and performs best on the well-drained calcareous marls to the north and south of Alba in the DOCG zones of Barbaresco and Barolo.

Langhe Nebbiolo is effectively the ‘second wine’ of Piedmont’s great Barolo & Barbarescos. This DOC is the only way Langhe producers can declassify their Barolo or Barbaresco fruit or wines to make an early-drinking style. Unlike Nebbiolo d’Alba, Langhe Nebbiolo can be cut with 15% other red indigenous varieties, such as Barbera or Dolcetto.

Nebbiolo flowers early and ripens late, so a long hang time, producing high levels of sugar, acidity and tannins; the challenge being to harvest the fruit with these three elements ripe and in balance. The best Barolos and Barbarescos are perfumed with aromas of tar, rose, mint, chocolate, liquorice and truffles. They age brilliantly and the very best need ten years to show at their best.

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