2011 Champagne Krug, Brut

2011 Champagne Krug, Brut

Product: 20118027876
Prices start from £301.00 per bottle (75cl). Buying options
2011 Champagne Krug, Brut

Buying options

Available for delivery or collection. Pricing includes duty and VAT.
Free delivery on orders over £200. Find out more

Description

Krug ID: 322038

The 2011 Vintage is a very pretty wine in this highly challenging vintage. Apricot, mint, dried herbs and a kiss of French oak open nicely in the glass. There is some of the savory character of 2011, but it is nicely woven into the wine’s fabric. To be sure, the 2011 is a slender vintage at Krug. That is especially evident in the wine's light-ish mid-palate and overall feel, yet all the elements are impeccably balanced. I expect the 2011 to be a relatively early maturing Vintage and would not push my luck on aging. Disgorged: Summer 2022.

Drink 2024 - 2036

Antonio Galloni, Vinous (November 2023)

wine at a glance

Delivery and quality guarantee

Critics reviews

Antonio Galloni, Vinous93/100

Krug ID: 322038

The 2011 Vintage is a very pretty wine in this highly challenging vintage. Apricot, mint, dried herbs and a kiss of French oak open nicely in the glass. There is some of the savory character of 2011, but it is nicely woven into the wine’s fabric. To be sure, the 2011 is a slender vintage at Krug. That is especially evident in the wine's light-ish mid-palate and overall feel, yet all the elements are impeccably balanced. I expect the 2011 to be a relatively early maturing Vintage and would not push my luck on aging. Disgorged: Summer 2022.

Drink 2024 - 2036

Antonio Galloni, Vinous (November 2023)

Read more
Decanter93/100

Krug has termed the 2011 vintage ‘spirited roundness’. Krug has sought to elevate what cellar master Julie Cavil terms the ‘duality’ of the vintage: the ‘generosity’ of the Chardonnay and the ‘strict, solid’ Pinot Noir. As such, the fruit is more tilted to greengage and lime than sunnier yellow or orange tones, intriguing in its subtle creaminess and detailed with notes of charcoal, green tea and toasted almond. There's a proper snap of cooked lime freshness keeping it taut, yet an up-front juiciness of white pear flesh and pale stone fruit promising immediacy. The 'roundness' moniker rings true, although it is a fairly reserved, quiet sort of roundness rather than anything powerful or decadent. It's rare to get a solo taste of the 2011 vintage presented with such ambition, and there's no surprise in finding that Krug has backed it with a rewarding wine.

Drink 2024 - 2032

Tom Hewson, Decanter (February 2024)

Read more
Jeb Dunnuck97/100

Krug ID: 322038

Because 2011 was a challenging vintage for Champagne, it would be very easy to over-generalize, as many readers may have had less than ideal experiences elsewhere. But Krug’s 2011 Champagne Millesime Brut is not your average Champagne. With a rounded nose, it pours a medium golden straw hue and is creamy with aromas of orange blossoms, custard, fresh pear, hazelnut, and delicate smoky incense. Medium to full-bodied and refined on the palate, it has a rounded and pristine profile, with ripe, balanced fruit floating through the palate, a pinpoint mousse, and a delicate hint of almond skin on the finish that I would expect to become more pronounced with age. Following the more tension-driven vintage of 2008, which was characterized by a more high-toned and lemon-tinged profile, this wine will be accessible sooner (probably also the case for the future release of 2012) and will undoubtedly provide an open window for drinking over the coming 15 to 20 years.

Drink 2028 - 2048

Audrey Frick, JebDunnuck.com (February 2024)

Read more
The Real Review96/100

Pinot Noir 46%, Chardonnay 37%, Pinot Meunier 17%.

Pale lemon in colour, the 2011—disgorged in March 2022—has a marked purity and freshness of aroma with a light smoky note; fine-textured fruit with sumptuous purity and intensity of flavour; still very youthful, lightly smoky and crackling with energy, it’s underpinned by spicy notes and a fine blade of crisp, yuzu-citrusy acidity.

Anthony Rose, The Real Review (February 2024)

Read more

About this WINE

Krug

Krug

Krug was established in 1843 and has since specialised in producing only prestige and specialised champagnes. Krug is the only firm still producing all its champagne in small oak casks, an essential element for developing Krug's intense bouquet and complex flavours. Today, Henri, Rémi and Olivier Krug, who supervise every step of production, tasting and blending, represent the 5th and 6th generations.

With long periods of maturation (6-8 years), Krug champagne continues to age gracefully after release, developing an intensely rich, nutty flavour whilst remaining remarkably fresh.

Krug`s finest champagne is Clos du Mesnil, a 100%-Chardonnay based champagne that comes from a small walled vineyard at Le Mesnil-sur-Oger. It is one of the world`s greatest Blanc de Blanc champagnes.

Find out more
Brut Champagne

Brut Champagne

Brut denotes a dry style of Champagne (less than 15 grams per litre). Most Champagne is non-vintage, produced from a blend from different years. The non-vintage blend is always based predominately on wines made from the current harvest, enriched with aged wines (their proportion and age varies by brand) from earlier harvests, which impart an additional level of complexity to the end wine. Champagnes from a single vintage are labelled with the year reference and with the description Millésimé.

Non-vintage Champagnes can improve with short-term ageing (typically two to three years), while vintages can develop over much longer periods (five to 30 years). The most exquisite and often top-priced expression of a house’s style is referred to as Prestige Cuvée. Famous examples include Louis Roederer's Cristal, Moët & Chandon's Dom Pérignon, and Pol Roger's Cuvée Sir Winston Churchill.

Recommended Producers : Krug, Billecart Salmon, Pol Roger, Bollinger, Salon, Gosset, Pierre Péters, Ruinart


Find out more
Champagne blend

Champagne blend

Which grapes are included in the blend, and their proportion, is one of the key factors determining the style of most Champagnes. Three grapes are used - Pinot Noir, Chardonnay and Pinot Meunier.

26% of vineyards in Champagne are planted with Chardonnay and it performs best on the Côtes des Blancs and on the chalk slopes south of Epernay. It is relatively simple to grow, although it buds early and thus is susceptible to spring frosts. It produces lighter, fresher wines than those from Burgundy and gives finesse, fruit and elegance to the final blend. It is the sole grape in Blancs de Blancs, which are some of the richest long-lived Champagnes produced.

Pinot Noir accounts for nearly 40% of the plantings in Champagne and lies at the heart of most blends - it gives Champagne its body, structure, strength and grip. It is planted across Champagne and particularly so in the southern Aube district.

The final component is Pinot Meunier and this constitutes nearly 35% of the plantings. Its durability and resistance to spring frosts make the Marne Valley, a notorious frost pocket, its natural home. It ripens well in poor years and produces a soft, fruity style of wine that is ideal for blending with the more assertive flavours of Pinot Noir. Producers allege that Pinot Meunier lacks ageing potential, but this does not deter Krug from including around 15% of it in their final blends.


Find out more