2013 Clos de Vougeot, Grand Cru, Domaine François Lamarche, Burgundy

2013 Clos de Vougeot, Grand Cru, Domaine François Lamarche, Burgundy

Product: 20131040157
2013 Clos de Vougeot, Grand Cru, Domaine François Lamarche, Burgundy

Description

Displaying bright red fruit, this is very vibrant with lots of energy. There is a ripeness and sweetness not present in some of the earlier wines, though it is still very much about the red fruit. Quite a big mouthful with perfectly balanced structure. A fine point of acidity, far from excessive, this has the potential to be very good. 
Jasper Morris, MW - Wine Buyer

Harvest began 6th October, the grapes in surprisingly healthy condition given the weather, allowing Nicole to use some whole bunches. There is a tiny bit more wine than in 2011 and 2012 but a really poor flowering reduced the crop and spun out the flowering. In vinification, Nicole opted to extract less than in other years. The Grands Crus are sold in wooden cases.

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Critics reviews

Wine Advocate91/100
Wine Advocate91/100
Tasted blind at the Burgfest tasting in Beaune, the 2013 Clos de Vougeot Grand Cru has a much better nose than those from Vougeraie and Mo-Camuzet, offering red plum, raspberry preserve, rose petals and hints of sage in the background. The palate is medium-bodied with supple ripe tannin, redcurrant and cranberry fruit, nicely focused with a strict and linear, yet intense finish. Give this another 2-3 years in bottle and you will have a fine Clos de Vougeot. Tasted September 2016.
Neal Martin - 29/11/2016 Read more

About this WINE

Domaine Lamarche

Domaine Lamarche

The domaine makes 14 different wines across 11 hectares, including the monopole of the Grand Cru La Grande Rue. Nicole Lamarche took over from her father, François, in 2006; from ’19, the domaine now carries her name.

Nicole’s style is one of a light touch; the wines aren’t deeply coloured and are sensually soft yet show wonderful intensity.

In the vineyard
Under her aegis, the vineyards have been converted to organic and biodynamic production, although certification isn’t sought. The vines are now trained higher, and leaf cover is retained. In the cellar, the barrel regime has been changed, both in the lower proportion of new oak used each year, and in the coopers that supply the barrels

In the winery
When asked for details of the winemaking process, Nicole remains steadfastly enigmatic: there’s no formula and every cuvée receives a customised élevage. However, there’s always a proportion of whole bunch on the top wines, usually around 30%.

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Vougeot

Vougeot

Most of the wine produced in this small village comes from a single, walled Grand Cru vineyard, the famous Clos de Vougeot. The vineyard in its present form dates from 1336 (when it was first planted by monks of Cîteaux), although it was not until the following century that it was entirely enclosed by stone walls. 

Clos de Vougeot is both the smallest commune and the largest Clos in the Cote d’Or. It consists of 50 hectares of vineyards shared among 82 owners, with six soil types. There is quite a difference in quality between the upper (best) and lower (least fine) parts of the vineyard, though in medieval times a blend from all sectors was considered optimum.

Le Domaine de la Vougeraie makes a very fine white wine from Le Clos Blanc de Vougeot, first picked out by the monks of Cîteaux as being suitable ground for white grapes in the year 1110.

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Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir is probably the most frustrating, and at times infuriating, wine grape in the world. However when it is successful, it can produce some of the most sublime wines known to man. This thin-skinned grape which grows in small, tight bunches performs well on well-drained, deepish limestone based subsoils as are found on Burgundy's Côte d'Or.

Pinot Noir is more susceptible than other varieties to over cropping - concentration and varietal character disappear rapidly if yields are excessive and yields as little as 25hl/ha are the norm for some climats of the Côte d`Or.

Because of the thinness of the skins, Pinot Noir wines are lighter in colour, body and tannins. However the best wines have grip, complexity and an intensity of fruit seldom found in wine from other grapes. Young Pinot Noir can smell almost sweet, redolent with freshly crushed raspberries, cherries and redcurrants. When mature, the best wines develop a sensuous, silky mouth feel with the fruit flavours deepening and gamey "sous-bois" nuances emerging.

The best examples are still found in Burgundy, although Pinot Noir`s key role in Champagne should not be forgotten. It is grown throughout the world with notable success in the Carneros and Russian River Valley districts of California, and the Martinborough and Central Otago regions of New Zealand.

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