2016 Pinot Noir, Grossi Laüe, Famille Hugel, Alsace

2016 Pinot Noir, Grossi Laüe, Famille Hugel, Alsace

Product: 20168036542
 
2016 Pinot Noir, Grossi Laüe, Famille Hugel, Alsace

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Available by the case In Bond. Pricing excludes duty and VAT, which must be paid separately before delivery. Storage charges apply.
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Description

The price of the 75cl bottle, reduced from £51 previously, includes a 10% discount. This offer is valid until midnight on 31st March and does not apply to BBX listings.

Just 3,500 bottles were made.

Vibrant red-ruby. Hints of menthol, flint, sweet spices and herbs complicate rich red fruit (red cherry, raspberry) aromas and flavours. It finishes long and youthfully chewy but with very good, lingering red fruit perfume. The grapes used to make this wine are picked in the very best part of the Pflostig and the south-facing section of the Rosenborg. Marc told me there is a night-and-day difference between these two parcels of vines, as the soils are very different: one granite and limestone, the other one all limestone. 

Barrel-fermented in 20% new oak and aged in barriques, only 20% of which are new, for ten months. Interestingly, back in 1990, the oak regimen at Hugel called for 100% new, but that proved overly generous and marked the finished wines too much. This will age very well, and it needs time to round out: forget about it in the cellar for five or six years at least (though, in fact, this won’t be on sale for another four years.

Drink 2026 - 2032

Ian D'Agata, Vinous.com (April 2018)

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Critics reviews

Ian D'Agata, Vinous92+/100

Just 3,500 bottles were made.

Vibrant red-ruby. Hints of menthol, flint, sweet spices and herbs complicate rich red fruit (red cherry, raspberry) aromas and flavours. It finishes long and youthfully chewy but with very good, lingering red fruit perfume. The grapes used to make this wine are picked in the very best part of the Pflostig and the south-facing section of the Rosenborg. Marc told me there is a night-and-day difference between these two parcels of vines, as the soils are very different: one granite and limestone, the other one all limestone. 

Barrel-fermented in 20% new oak and aged in barriques, only 20% of which are new, for ten months. Interestingly, back in 1990, the oak regimen at Hugel called for 100% new, but that proved overly generous and marked the finished wines too much. This will age very well, and it needs time to round out: forget about it in the cellar for five or six years at least (though, in fact, this won’t be on sale for another four years.

Drink 2026 - 2032

Ian D'Agata, Vinous.com (April 2018)

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James Suckling94/100

If you like top red Burgundy then you will love this complex Alsace pinot noir with its rooty, spicy and liquorice complexity. Wonderful texture on the concentrated and impeccably balanced palate. Long, very subtle finish that’s simultaneously structured and silky. Lots of aging potential!

Drink or hold

James Suckling, JamesSuckling.com (March 2023)

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About this WINE

Hugel et Fils

Hugel et Fils

Now run by the 13th generation, Hugel is one of the oldest family estates in Alsace. Hugel enjoys a well-earned reputation for its wines at every level, but particularly for its dry Grand Cru Riesling and the sweet late-harvest and botrytised styles.

About the producer
Hugel was founded in Riquewihr in 1639 by Hans Ulrich Hugel. It has remained in the family ever since. The modern era here began in 1902 when Frédéric Emile Hugel moved the business to premises in the centre of the village. He was a true pioneer of Alsace wines, responsible for obtaining official recognition for the late-harvest Vendange Tardive and botrytised Sélection de Grains Nobles wines. The domaine continues to make some of the finest examples of these styles.

The family makes wine using fruit from its own vineyards and from local growers with whom they have long-term contracts. The range includes wines from all the regional varieties, though as with most top Alsatian producers, it is Hugel’s Rieslings which are most highly prized.

In the vineyard
The Hugel family’s vineyards cover more than 25 hectares, exclusively in Riquewihr, almost half of which are classified as Grand Cru. The vineyards, whose average vine age is at least 30 years, are managed organically. Yields are rigorously controlled by trellising methods, canopy management and thinning of excess bunches. Harvest is done by hand, where careful selection also manages yields.

As well as farming their own estate, the family purchase grapes from growers under long-term contract, farming more than 100 hectares. This enables Hugel to use fruit from a dozen of the best villages in the surrounding areas.

In the winery
Grapes are inspected and sorted on arrival to the winery, and presses are filled by gravity. Both stainless-steel tanks and oak foudres are used for maturation, varying depending on the grape variety and quality level.

Hugel divide their extensive range into four levels: Famille Hugel Classics, made from purchased fruit; Famille Hugel Estate, made exclusively from estate-grown grapes; Hugel Tradition and Famille Hugel Grossi Laüe (formerly Hugel Jubilee), both using a combination of purchased and estate grapes, from the most favoured sites in the portfolio.

The range also includes separate categories for their Vendange Tardive and Sélection de Grains Nobles wines, Gentil (a blend of regional varieties) and a wine from Grand Cru Schoenenbourg called Riesling Schoelhammer, launched in 2007.

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Pinot Noir  AOC Alsace

Pinot Noir AOC Alsace

While Alsace is more renowned for its white wines, the Pinot Noir AOC (Appellation d’Origine Contrôlée) represents the region’s efforts in producing quality red wines.

The Pinot Noir grape is notoriously sensitive and challenging to cultivate, but Alsace’s unique climate and terroir offer favourable conditions for its successful growth. The region’s continental climate, with warm summers, sunny days, cool nights, and well-drained soils, provides an excellent environment for Pinot Noir grapes’ slow and steady ripening. These factors contribute to developing rich and aromatic flavours in the wines.

In Alsace, winemakers practice traditional and modern techniques to craft Pinot Noir wines that showcase the grape’s elegance and finesse. The grapes are usually hand-harvested to ensure the selection of only the highest-quality fruit. Many winemakers opt for minimal intervention during the winemaking process to preserve the grape’s natural characteristics.

The Pinot Noir wines typically exhibit a vibrant ruby colour, accompanied by enticing aromas of red berries, cherries, and sometimes floral notes. On the palate, these wines usually display a delicate balance of fruitiness, acidity, and refined tannins, making them versatile and food-friendly.

While the Pinot Noir AOC Alsace wines may not be as well-known as their white counterparts, they offer a delightful and unique expression of this grape variety, capturing the essence of Alsace’s distinctive terroir and winemaking expertise. Whether enjoyed on their own or paired with a variety of dishes, these Alsace Pinot Noirs have gained recognition for their quality and have become a fascinating addition to the diverse wine offerings of the region.

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Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir is probably the most frustrating, and at times infuriating, wine grape in the world. However when it is successful, it can produce some of the most sublime wines known to man. This thin-skinned grape which grows in small, tight bunches performs well on well-drained, deepish limestone based subsoils as are found on Burgundy's Côte d'Or.

Pinot Noir is more susceptible than other varieties to over cropping - concentration and varietal character disappear rapidly if yields are excessive and yields as little as 25hl/ha are the norm for some climats of the Côte d`Or.

Because of the thinness of the skins, Pinot Noir wines are lighter in colour, body and tannins. However the best wines have grip, complexity and an intensity of fruit seldom found in wine from other grapes. Young Pinot Noir can smell almost sweet, redolent with freshly crushed raspberries, cherries and redcurrants. When mature, the best wines develop a sensuous, silky mouth feel with the fruit flavours deepening and gamey "sous-bois" nuances emerging.

The best examples are still found in Burgundy, although Pinot Noir`s key role in Champagne should not be forgotten. It is grown throughout the world with notable success in the Carneros and Russian River Valley districts of California, and the Martinborough and Central Otago regions of New Zealand.

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