2017 Puligny-Montrachet, Domaine de Montille, Burgundy

2017 Puligny-Montrachet, Domaine de Montille, Burgundy

Product: 20178012889
Prices start from £70.00 per bottle (75cl). Buying options
2017 Puligny-Montrachet, Domaine de Montille, Burgundy

Description

Provenance is everything. This is from a section of the Chalumeaux Premier Cru vineyard which had to be declassified in 1975 when the previous owner illegally imported some fertile topsoil. Time has healed much of the damage and there isn’t another hillside Puligny vineyard classified as village. Parcels from Levron and Baudrières-Nosroy complete the blend. A fine, generous and complex style. Drink 2022-2029.

Winemaker Brian Sieve draws comparisons between the white wines of 2017 and 2014, explaining that the texture, weight and freshness are very similar in both years, although 2017 has perhaps a little more fruit ripeness, along with excellent tension and persistence. He believes that this same freshness and brightness in the reds will provide ageing capacity, pointing out that they worked hard to restrict the yield of Pinot Noir to achieve riper grapes. Overall slightly less whole-bunch fermentation was used as Brian felt the stems and fruit were not as ripe as in richer vintages.

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About this WINE

Domaine de Montille

Domaine de Montille

Domaine de Montille is a first class Côte de Beaune domaine and one which is producing some of the purest expressions of Pinot Noir to be found in Burgundy today. The domaine was developed by Hubert de Montille, a prominent Dijon lawyer, who inherited 2.5 hectares of vineyards in Volnay in 1951 and most of the production was sold in bulk to négociants. Over the years he acquired further parcels in Volnay, as well as 4 hectares in Pommard, taking his total holdings to just short of 17 hectares.

Today the domaine is run by his son Etienne. The winemaking is traditional - partial destemming followed by a relatively long maceration period. The wines are aged in oak barriques (20-30% new) and are bottled unfiltered. These are wonderfully elegant, harmonious wines that require at least five years bottle ageing to show at their very best.

The domaine has recently been considerably extended by purchases of vineyards in Beaune, Corton, and (from 2005) the Cote de Nuits, including some marvellous Vosne Romanee Les Malconsorts. There are also some fine holdings of white wine vineyards, especially Puligny Montrachet Les Caillerets.

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Puligny Montrachet

Puligny Montrachet

Puligny was one of two villages (along with Chassagne) which gained permission in 1879 to hyphenate the name of its most famous vineyard, Montrachet, to its own.

The reputation of Puligny-Montrachet is based around its four Grands Crus. Montrachet labels often boast a noble, triumphant ‘Le’ in front of its name, lest you dare confuse it with any lesser wine. It has much to be proud of, with many considering Montrachet to be the greatest white wine in the world. At its best it has an intensity, complexity and elegance that make you wonder how such a wine could be made from mere grapes.

The luxurious and explosive Chevalier-Montrachet is not quite as deep, although it is probably the next best. Only marginally less impressive, and rather more consistent than Montrachet is the richly textured Bâtard-Montrachet (also shared with Chassagne). Bienvenues-Bâtard-Montrachet is equally good, with the focus on honeyed finesse and exquisite balance rather than richness.

These legendary wines are supported by a host of fabulous Premier Cru vineyards capable of reaching Grand Cru quality. Brimming with flavour and intensity, Le Cailleret and Les Pucelles (which both lie across the road from Le Montrachet) are prime candidates, along with Les Demoiselles, Les Combettes and Folatières.

Sandwiched between the larger Chassagne and Meursault, Puligny produces wines that are more striking than any in the Côte d’Or, portraying a floral elegance alongside a stylish, steely concentration. They are very different to Meursault: more refined and delicate, and less rich.

Village level Puligny-Montrachet from top growers can be very good indeed, but is all too often unexciting and disappointing. Grands Crus normally need at least eight years before they can be broached, and last for 20 or more. Premiers Crus should generally be enjoyed between five and 15 years of age; village wines from three to 10 years.

In theory, you can find red Puligny-Montrachet, but it scarcely exists anymore, and is rarely worth the price tag.

  • 114 hectares of village Puligny-Montrachet
  • 100 hectares of Premier Cru vineyards (17 in all). The best vineyards include Les Demoiselles, Le Cailleret, Les Pucelles, Les Combettes, Les Folatières
  • 21 hectares of Grand Cru vineyards: Le Montrachet (part), Chevalier-Montrachet, Bâtard-Montrachet (part), Bienvenues-Bâtard-Montrachet
  • Recommended Producers: LeflaiveCarillon
  • Recommended Restaurant: Le Montrachet (excellent cuisine and good wine list; also an hotel)

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Chardonnay

Chardonnay

Chardonnay is the "Big Daddy" of white wine grapes and one of the most widely planted in the world. It is suited to a wide variety of soils, though it excels in soils with a high limestone content as found in Champagne, Chablis, and the Côte D`Or.

Burgundy is Chardonnay's spiritual home and the best White Burgundies are dry, rich, honeyed wines with marvellous poise, elegance and balance. They are unquestionably the finest dry white wines in the world. Chardonnay plays a crucial role in the Champagne blend, providing structure and finesse, and is the sole grape in Blanc de Blancs.

It is quantitatively important in California and Australia, is widely planted in Chile and South Africa, and is the second most widely planted grape in New Zealand. In warm climates Chardonnay has a tendency to develop very high sugar levels during the final stages of ripening and this can occur at the expense of acidity. Late picking is a common problem and can result in blowsy and flabby wines that lack structure and definition.

Recently in the New World, we have seen a move towards more elegant, better- balanced and less oak-driven Chardonnays, and this is to be welcomed.

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Reviews

Customer reviews

Wine Advocate87-89/100

Critic reviews

Wine Advocate87-89/100
The 2017 Puligny-Montrachet Village displays notes of ripe apples, white flowers and pastry cream, followed by a medium-bodied, pure and vibrant palate that will likely flesh out with further levage. Like the other bottlings that were formerly offered under the Chteau de Puligny-Montrachet label, it's a touch more open-knit and precocious than I suspect future iterations under the de Montille label will be.
William Kelley - 31/01/2019 Read more