2018 St Joseph Blanc, Les Granits, M. Chapoutier, Rhône

2018 St Joseph Blanc, Les Granits, M. Chapoutier, Rhône

Product: 20188116675
2018 St Joseph Blanc, Les Granits, M. Chapoutier, Rhône

Description

Good freshness and precision. Rounded, plenty of body and weight, but also depth, real generosity of body, partly through alcohol. Honeysuckle, pithy citrus notes combine with good length and real mineral drive leading to a saline finish.

Drink 2020-2026

Decanter (Oct 2019)

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Critics reviews

Decanter93/100
Jeb Dunnuck97/100
Josh Raynolds, Vinous94/100
Decanter93/100
Good freshness and precision. Rounded, plenty of body and weight, but also depth, real generosity of body, partly through alcohol. Honeysuckle, pithy citrus notes combine with good length and real mineral drive leading to a saline finish.

Drink 2020-2026

Decanter (Oct 2019) Read more
Jeb Dunnuck97/100
A killer wine as always, the 2018 Saint Joseph Les Granits Blanc reveals a medium gold color as well as powerful notes of white currants, toasted spices, brioche, quince, and crushed rock. With beautiful richness, medium to full body, no hard edges and a great finish, it's consistently one of the great whites in the appellation. This was another stunning tasting with the team at Chapoutier. They’ve produced some of the wines of the vintage in both 2017 and 2018. The team here compares 2017 to 2007, which is a comparison I understand, even if I think the quality of their 2017s are a step up. Both vintages were hot and dry, and the wines have expressive, sunny profiles. I reviewed their top 2017 dry whites last year, but the 2017 reds showed spectacularly well this year, most coming in at the upper end of their barrel range. Looking at the 2018s, this is another blockbuster year at this estate and the wines reveal even deeper purple (almost blue) hues compared their 2017 counterparts as well as a touch more freshness in their aromatics reminiscent of a cooler vintage. Nevertheless, these are big, rich, concentrated wines that have building tannins and structure as well as loads of fruit, and are built for the cellar. One of the beauties of the 2018s is that the wines have a wonderful sense of freshness and purity reminiscent of a cooler year, yet paired with the fruit, depth, and richness of a warmer year. Lastly, the lineup here seems to grow each year and at present, includes two sparkling wines, three Saint-Péray, two Condrieu, two Cornas, four Côte Rôtie, six Crozes Hermitage, nine Hermitage, and six Saint Joseph. Also, there are a handful of Vin de France and IGP releases. The top “Sélections Parcellaires” cuvées range from 300 to 1,000 cases, and while they can be frightfully expensive, they’re among the greatest wines in the world. However, don’t overlook the value releases from Chapoutier, where you get serious bang for the buck.

Drink 202-2035

Jeb Dunnuck, jebdunnuck.com (Dec 2019) Read more
Josh Raynolds, Vinous94/100
Limpid yellow-gold. Powerful, smoke-accented aromas of ripe citrus and orchard fruits are complemented by emerging mineral and floral overtones. Bright, focused and lively on the palate, offering densely packed orange zest, pear skin, candied ginger flavors and a suggestion of honeysuckle. In a graceful style but deeply concentrated as well, displaying solid finishing cut and repeating florality.

Drink 2023-2031

Josh Raynolds, Vinous (May 2020) Read more

About this WINE

Maison Chapoutier

Maison Chapoutier

Michel Chapoutier’s range, which grows ever-more impressive, is the most complete dissection of the region’s styles and terroir. The domaine was founded in 1808. When Michel took charge in 1988, he became the seventh generation of his family to run the domaine. Since then, quality has soared, and he is now farming all his vineyards biodynamically and busily investing in new winemaking projects across the globe, as far-flung as Australia.

Chapoutier describes 2019 as a year of extremes, but an exceptional vintage that produced fine, elegant reds, and balanced, mineral whites. He feels the year’s heat has translated to intensity and depth of profile. Wines at the higher end of the range are built to age and will do so fantastically.

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Saint-Joseph

Saint-Joseph

St Joseph is the second-largest appellation in the Northern Rhône with 50 growers producing wines from over 600 hectares of vineyards. Established in 1956, over 90 percent of the wine is red – made exclusively from the Syrah grape. The white wines, meanwhile, are typically a blend of Marsanne and Roussanne varieties. Its vineyards run due south on the west side below Condrieu, and are in six communes: Mauves, Tournon, St Jean-de-Muzols, Lemps, Vion and Glun.

The styles of wine in St Joseph tend to be much lighter than other red Appellations d'Origine Contrôlee and the quality can vary dramatically. The soils and climate differ, as it is a long, narrow AOC. There is no particular characteristic of the commune as some wines are produced near Côte-Rôtie, while others are near to Cornas.

The best St Josephs are still produced in the original heartland of the appellation between St Jean-de-Muzols and Mauves, where soils are predominately granitic with patches of limestone and schist. Typically, even the finest St Josephs are slightly lighter and faster-maturing than the wines of Hermitage, as St Joseph's east-facing vineyards lose the sun up to two hours earlier in the crucial ripening season.

To meet demand, some extensions of the appellation have been made on less than ideal land, producing wines of indifferent quality.

Recommended producers: Pierre GaillardJerome Coursodon, Paul Jaboulet
Best vintages: 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2000, 1999, 1996, 1990

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Marsanne

Marsanne

Marsanne is the predominant white grape variety grown in the Northern Rhône where it is used to produce white St. Joseph, Crozes-Hermitage, and Hermitage. It is a tricky grape to cultivate, being susceptible to diseases and being particularly sensitive to extreme climatic changes - if growing conditions are too cool, then it fails to ripen fully and produces thin, insipid wines, while, if too hot, the resultant wines are blowsy, overblown and out of balance.

In the Northern Rhône it tends to be blended with around 15% Rousanne and produces richly aromatic, nutty wines which age marvellously - the best examples are from Hermitage and particularly from Chapoutier. Increasingly it is being grown in the Southern Rhône and Languedoc Roussillon where it is bottled as a single varietal or blended with Roussanne, Viognier, and sometimes Chardonnay. It is also grown very successfully in Victoria in Australia where some of the world`s oldest Marsanne vines are to be found.

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