2020 Santenay, Clos des Mouches, 1er Cru, David Moreau, Burgundy

2020 Santenay, Clos des Mouches, 1er Cru, David Moreau, Burgundy

Product: 20201171152
Prices start from £250.00 per case Buying options
2020 Santenay, Clos des Mouches, 1er Cru, David Moreau, Burgundy

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Available by the case In Bond. Pricing excludes duty and VAT, which must be paid separately before delivery. Storage charges apply.
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6 x 75cl bottle
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Description

David’s pride in this wine – and his heritage – is palpable. The vineyard was created by his grandfather, the only person then prepared to undertake the work necessary to plant and tend this difficult, hard-limestone site. This is a cool, brightly composed wine, with fine tannins and a long finish. There is no whole bunch; this precision is unalloyed. Drink 2026-2038. 

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Critics reviews

Jasper Morris MW90-93/100
Apparently, this is a diverse terroir from the geological perspective. Fine full clear purple. The nose is a little reticent but is as well balanced as the rest of the range. The plot with the most finesse of the 1ers crus chez Moreau. There are some nicely built tannins towards the back but the fruit returns behind. Quality dark raspberries. Very good length. 15-20% whole bunch.

Jasper Morris MW, Inside Burgundy (January 2022) Read more

About this WINE

David Moreau

David Moreau

David Moreau has taken over part of his octogenerian grandfather’s wine domaine in Santenay in Côte de Beaune, beginning with the 2009 vintage. Prior to that David has worked with Olivier Lamy and Domaine de la Romanée Conti, as well as doing a stage in New Zealand at Neudorf.

David is beginning with 5 of the family’s 9 hectares and suffice to say that significant changes in both viticulture and vinification have been made compared to the ancien regime. The vineyards were almost all planted in the 1960s, so David has old vines to work with. They are mostly pruned by cordon royat to minimise vigour, and the land is either ploughed or left with grass depending on the circumstance of a given plot.

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Cote de Beaune

Cote de Beaune

With its three musketeers of Chassagne-Montrachet, Puligny-Montrachet and Meursault, alongside the imperial Corton-Charlemagne, the Côte de Beaune is home to the finest Chardonnays in the world. It hosts seven of Burgundy's eight white Grands Crus, along with a single red Grand Cru. Ironically though, much more red wine is made in this southern half of the Côte d'Or than white.

Stretching 30km south past the town of Beaune to Cheilly-lès-Maranges, the Côte de Beaune has a more expansive feel and gentler slopes than the Côte de Nuits. Its finest Chardonnays are characterised by an incomparable intensity and complexity, while its Pinot Noirs generally have softness and finesse as their calling cards. The best reds come from Beaune, Pommard and Volnay, and the powerful Grand Cru of Corton.

As in the Côte de Nuits, the fragmentation of the Côte de Beaune's vineyards brings the single biggest hurdle for any wine lover, namely the unpredictability of its wine. The human factor is paramount, and sadly too many lazy or unscrupulous growers and merchants have produced disappointing wines from some of the region's greatest names, while their more talented and quality-minded neighbours craft exquisite examples from the same terroir. Happily, quality is now higher than it has ever been here and organic and biodynamic methods are increasingly popular – especially amongst the younger generation.

Wines labeled `Beaune' come from the appellation adjoining the town while those labeled Côte de Beaune (red or white) emanate from a group of vineyards on the hill above. Côte de Beaune Villages is a red wine that can be made from a number of lesser, named villages in the region, while Hautes-Côtes de Beaune (mostly red) is produced from vineyards in the hills to the west of the appellation, divided in two by St Romain. These tend to be light yet often fine wines, especially in hot years like 2003 and 2005.

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Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir is probably the most frustrating, and at times infuriating, wine grape in the world. However when it is successful, it can produce some of the most sublime wines known to man. This thin-skinned grape which grows in small, tight bunches performs well on well-drained, deepish limestone based subsoils as are found on Burgundy's Côte d'Or.

Pinot Noir is more susceptible than other varieties to over cropping - concentration and varietal character disappear rapidly if yields are excessive and yields as little as 25hl/ha are the norm for some climats of the Côte d`Or.

Because of the thinness of the skins, Pinot Noir wines are lighter in colour, body and tannins. However the best wines have grip, complexity and an intensity of fruit seldom found in wine from other grapes. Young Pinot Noir can smell almost sweet, redolent with freshly crushed raspberries, cherries and redcurrants. When mature, the best wines develop a sensuous, silky mouth feel with the fruit flavours deepening and gamey "sous-bois" nuances emerging.

The best examples are still found in Burgundy, although Pinot Noir`s key role in Champagne should not be forgotten. It is grown throughout the world with notable success in the Carneros and Russian River Valley districts of California, and the Martinborough and Central Otago regions of New Zealand.

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