2020 Château Langlet, Graves, Bordeaux

2020 Château Langlet, Graves, Bordeaux

Product: 20201312399
Prices start from £19.00 per bottle (75cl). Buying options
2020 Château Langlet, Graves, Bordeaux

Buying options

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Description

Fragranced strawberries, red cherries and raspberries on the nose have a slightly darker profile on the palate, combined with eucalyptus, mint and liquorice, giving a sticky savouriness to the expression. Tannins are beautiful, so smooth and silky, with texture from the wet stone minerality and slight spice. I like the tension, the high definition of the elements, and the clear florality you get on the palate, which many don't have. Not yet ready to drink but this will be nice.

Drink 2025 - 2035

Georgina Hindle, Decanter.com (September 2022)

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Decanter90/100

Fragranced strawberries, red cherries and raspberries on the nose have a slightly darker profile on the palate, combined with eucalyptus, mint and liquorice, giving a sticky savouriness to the expression. Tannins are beautiful, so smooth and silky, with texture from the wet stone minerality and slight spice. I like the tension, the high definition of the elements, and the clear florality you get on the palate, which many don't have. Not yet ready to drink but this will be nice.

Drink 2025 - 2035

Georgina Hindle, Decanter.com (September 2022)

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About this WINE

Chateau Langlet

Chateau Langlet

Ch. Langlet is situated in the Cabanac-Villagrains commune in southern Graves. It’s one of the oldest vineyards in the appellation, able to trace its history back to at least 1868.

The estate was acquired in 1999 by the Kressmann family, prominent in Bordeaux and best known as the owners of Ch. Latour-Martillac, a leading classified growth in Pessac-Léognan.

Valérie Vialard, Latour-Martillac’s winemaker, consults at Langlet. The 8.6-hectare estate produces a red and white Graves.

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Graves

Graves

Graves is the region which first established Bordeaux's wine reputation. Its wines were exported to England as early as the 12th century and Samuel Pepys drank Ho Bryan (sic) in London on 10th April, 1663.

The names Graves is derived from ‘gravel’ and the best soils are gravel-rich, mixed with sand and occasionally clay. Graves is larger in areas than the Médoc but produces only half the amount of wine. The best wines of Graves were initially classified in 1953 with this classification being confirmed in 1959.

Until 1987, this entire region, which runs immediately south of the city of Bordeaux until it reaches Sauternes, was known as the Graves and its entirety is still sometimes informally referred to as such, but from the 1986 vintage a new communal district was created within Graves, based on the districts of Pessac and Léognan, the first of which lies within the suburbs of the city.

Pessac-Léognan has the best soils of the region, very similar to those of the Médoc, although the depth of gravel is more variable, and contains all the Classed Growths of the region. Some of its great names, including Ch. Haut-Brion, even sit serenely and resolutely in Bordeaux's southern urban sprawl.

The climate is milder than to the north of the city, and the harvest can occur up to two weeks earlier. This gives the best wines a heady, rich and almost savoury character, laced with notes of tobacco, spice and leather. Further south, the soil is sandier with more clay, and the wines are lighter, fruity and suitable for earlier drinking.

Recommended Châteaux

Ch. Haut-Brion, Ch. la Mission Haut-Brion, Ch. Pape Clément, Ch. Haut-Bailly, Domaine de Chevalier, Ch. Larrivet Haut-Brion, Ch. Les Carmes Haut-Brion, Ch. La Garde, Villa Bel-Air.

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Cabernet Sauvignon Blend

Cabernet Sauvignon Blend

Cabernet Sauvignon lends itself particularly well in blends with Merlot. This is actually the archetypal Bordeaux blend, though in different proportions in the sub-regions and sometimes topped up with Cabernet Franc, Malbec, and Petit Verdot.

In the Médoc and Graves the percentage of Cabernet Sauvignon in the blend can range from 95% (Mouton-Rothschild) to as low as 40%. It is particularly suited to the dry, warm, free- draining, gravel-rich soils and is responsible for the redolent cassis characteristics as well as the depth of colour, tannic structure and pronounced acidity of Médoc wines. However 100% Cabernet Sauvignon wines can be slightly hollow-tasting in the middle palate and Merlot with its generous, fleshy fruit flavours acts as a perfect foil by filling in this cavity.

In St-Emilion and Pomerol, the blends are Merlot dominated as Cabernet Sauvignon can struggle to ripen there - when it is included, it adds structure and body to the wine. Sassicaia is the most famous Bordeaux blend in Italy and has spawned many imitations, whereby the blend is now firmly established in the New World and particularly in California and  Australia.

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