2021 Bourgogne Passetoutgrain, L'Exception, Domaine Michel Lafarge

2021 Bourgogne Passetoutgrain, L'Exception, Domaine Michel Lafarge

Product: 20211150689
Prices start from £22.95 per bottle (75cl). Buying options
2021 Bourgogne Passetoutgrain, L'Exception, Domaine Michel Lafarge

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Description

A peppery and earthy array of red and dark berries gives way to impressively dense middleweight flavours that possess unusually good depth and persistence on the moderately rustic finish. This is terrific for what it is and highly recommended.

Drink from 2026 onward

Allen Meadows, Burghound.com (April 2023)

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Critics reviews

Burghound87-89/100

A peppery and earthy array of red and dark berries gives way to impressively dense middleweight flavours that possess unusually good depth and persistence on the moderately rustic finish. This is terrific for what it is and highly recommended.

Drink from 2026 onward

Allen Meadows, Burghound.com (April 2023)

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Neal Martin, Vinous88-90/100

The 2021 Bourgogne Passetoutgrain L’Exceptionne, from a complanté plot of Pinot Noir and Gamay (50/50), has a lovely bouquet with cassis, wild strawberry fruit and hints of blood orange. The palate is medium-bodied with juicy citrus notes, tart cherries, blueberry and a touch of pain d'épice on the finish. Delicious.

Drink 2023 - 2028

Neal Martin, Vinous.com (January 2023)

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Jancis Robinson MW16/20

50% Gamay, 50% Pinot Noir. Partial malolactic conversion. Cask sample.

Deep cherry. A touch of reduction and obvious spritz. High, brisk acidity. The fruit is dense and quite bulky. Difficult to judge today.

Drink 2025 - 2030

Matthew Hayes, JancisRobinson.com (January 2023)

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About this WINE

Domaine Michel Lafarge

Domaine Michel Lafarge

Following the sad passing of Michel in January 2020, his son Frédéric and granddaughter Clothilde maintain his legacy – producing some of the greatest wines in Volnay.

There’s nothing modern in the winemaking at Domaine Michel Lafarge, though the meticulous care for their biodynamically farmed vineyards puts them at the forefront of viticultural practices.

In the vineyard
Vineyard work is usually assisted by the estate’s hens, who eat up any lurking pests. In ’14, Frédéric and Chantal (maiden name Vial) Lafarge decided to buy some Beaujolais vineyards, starting in Fleurie before expanding into Chiroubles and the Côte de Brouilly. The vineyards had all previously been run organically, and that continues under the Lafarge-Vial stewardship – along with biodynamic treatments.

In the winery
The grapes are destemmed and vinified traditionally; very little new oak is used in the cellar.

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Bourgogne Rouge

Bourgogne Rouge

Bourgogne Rouge is the term used to apply to red wines from Burgundy that fall under the generic Bourgogne AOC, which can be produced by over 350 individual villages across the region. As with Bourgogne Blanc and Bourgogne Rosé, this is a very general appellation and thus is hard to pinpoint any specific characteristics of the wine as a whole, due to the huge variety of wines produced.

Around 4,600 acres of land across Burgundy are used to produce Bourgogne Rouge, which is around twice as much as is dedicated towards the production of generic whites.

Pinot Noir is the primary grape used in Bourgogne Rouge production, although Chardonnay, Pinot Blanc, Pinot Gris and in Yonne, César grapes are all also permitted to make up the rest of the wine. These wines tend to be focused and acidic, with the fruit less cloying than in some New World wines also made from Pinot Noir, and they develop more floral notes as they age.

Although an entry-level wine, some Bourgogne Rouges can be exquisite depending on the area and producer, and yet at a very affordable price.

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Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir is probably the most frustrating, and at times infuriating, wine grape in the world. However when it is successful, it can produce some of the most sublime wines known to man. This thin-skinned grape which grows in small, tight bunches performs well on well-drained, deepish limestone based subsoils as are found on Burgundy's Côte d'Or.

Pinot Noir is more susceptible than other varieties to over cropping - concentration and varietal character disappear rapidly if yields are excessive and yields as little as 25hl/ha are the norm for some climats of the Côte d`Or.

Because of the thinness of the skins, Pinot Noir wines are lighter in colour, body and tannins. However the best wines have grip, complexity and an intensity of fruit seldom found in wine from other grapes. Young Pinot Noir can smell almost sweet, redolent with freshly crushed raspberries, cherries and redcurrants. When mature, the best wines develop a sensuous, silky mouth feel with the fruit flavours deepening and gamey "sous-bois" nuances emerging.

The best examples are still found in Burgundy, although Pinot Noir`s key role in Champagne should not be forgotten. It is grown throughout the world with notable success in the Carneros and Russian River Valley districts of California, and the Martinborough and Central Otago regions of New Zealand.

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