2021 Château Malartic-Lagravière Blanc, Pessac-Léognan, Bordeaux

2021 Château Malartic-Lagravière Blanc, Pessac-Léognan, Bordeaux

Product: 20218011778
Prices start from £237.00 per case Buying options
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2021 Château Malartic-Lagravière Blanc, Pessac-Léognan, Bordeaux

Description

Sauvignon Blanc 89%, Sémillon 11%

There is plenty of weight in this wine. The bouquet is pronounced, with more exotic notes of lime, passionfruit, pineapple and custard apple. On the palate, the wine flips to being more mineral-driven; a hint of oyster shell complements the appealing palette of flavours which cover juicy citrus through to warm, wet stone. The wine’s freshness and energy make it bounce across the palate, but there is complexity now and to come as well. Drink 2024-2038.

Our score: 17/20

Berry Bros. & Rudd, April 2022

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Available by the case In Bond. Pricing excludes duty and VAT, which must be paid separately before delivery. Find out more.
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Case format
Availability
Price per case
6 x 75cl bottle
Berry Bros. & Rudd BB&R 1 case £237.00
En Primeur Limited availability
En Primeur Limited availability

Critics reviews

Wine Advocate90-93/100
Neal Martin, Vinous92-94/100
James Suckling95-96/100
Jancis Robinson MW16.5/20
Jane Anson94/100
Wine Advocate90-93/100

The 2021 Malartic Lagravière Blanc shows promise, bursting with aromas of lime zest, fresh mint, grapefruit and pastry cream. Medium to full-bodied, chiseled and nicely concentrated, it's a taut, intensely flavored wine that concludes with a long, saline finish.

William Kelley, Wine Advocate (Apr 2022) Read more

Neal Martin, Vinous92-94/100

The 2021 Malartic-Lagravière Blanc was picked from 15 to 24 September with less Sémillon due to frost (11%) and matured in 50% new oak. Clean and precise on the nose, this unfurls nicely in the glass, taut and mineral-driven. The palate is well balanced with fine acidity, lively and beautifully balanced, just the right amount of salinity with a cohesive and lingering finish. This is an outstanding white Pessac-Léognan.

Drink 2024 - 2045

Neal Martin, vinous.com, (May 2022) Read more

James Suckling95-96/100

This is very framed and beautiful. Tannin tension, in a very fine and polished way. It’s full-bodied, yet agile and almost weightless. Long and persistent with great finesse and structure. 89% sauvignon blanc and 11% semillon.

James Suckling, jamessuckling.com (May 2022) Read more

Jancis Robinson MW16.5/20

Notes of green vegetation on the nose. Then an attractive fruitiness on the palate. Already attractive, even if not one of the most complex white Pessac-Léognans. An early developer? Impressively persistent.

Drink 2023 - 2028

James Lawther, jancisrobinson.com (May 2022) Read more

Jane Anson94/100

White peach and pear, juicy texture, powerful, great quality with linen and slate texture though the palate and an expertly mouthwatering finish. Tasted twice, excellent quality.

Drink 2023 - 2034

Jane Anson, janeanson.com (May 2022) Read more

About this WINE

Chateau Malartic Lagraviere

Chateau Malartic Lagraviere

Château Malartic-Lagravière, a Cru Classé de Graves,was previously owned by the Champagne house, Laurent- Perrier - in 1997 it was bought by a Belgian couple, Michele and Alfred-Alexandre Bonnie, whose son and daughter-in-law, Jean-Jacques and Severine, have now assumed control.

There are 47 hectares of under vine, but only 7 of which are dedicated to white grapes, situated on a fine gravel ridge and now almost encroached on by the suburban outgrowth of Léognan. The estate produces high quality reds as well as tiny amounts of Sauvignon Blanc-dominated white wine. The red is a blend of 50% Cabernet Sauvignon, 25% Merlot and 25% Cabernet Franc.

The grapes are fermented partly in wooden vats, partly in stainless steel tanks, and then spend up to 15 months in oak barrels, roughly 50% of which are new. The creation of a second wine, La Réserve de Malartic Rouge (previously known as Le Sillage de Malartic), has been a further aid to the qualitative improvement which has been steadily taking place here over the past decade or so. In recent years no more than 60% of the crop goes into the Grand Vin, far less than back in the early 1990s and testament to the dedication to the highest levels of quality displayed by the new owners.

Their red wines are discreetly elegant, well-balanced that can be austere in youth but, with age, develop complexity and a distinct mineral character that is shared by all the great clarets of Pessac-Léognan.

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Bordeaux

Bordeaux

Bordeaux remains the centre of the fine wine world. The maritime climate on the 45th parallel provides for temperate winters and long, warm summers, perfect conditions for growing grapes suited to the production of classically-constructed, long-lasting wines. This vast region of 120,000ha of vineyards (four times the size of Burgundy) is home to 10,000 wine producers and 57 different AOCs. Red now makes up 88 percent of Bordeaux wine, and is usually referred to as Claret. The origin of this name was to differentiate the lighter-coloured wines of the coastal region from the deeper "black" wines from up-country regions. 

The Left Bank, comprising the wine regions of the Médoc, Pessac-Léognan and Graves are planted predominantly with Cabernet Sauvignon, which thrives on the gravelly soils left by the ancient course of the river. This is a thick-skinned variety which ripens late, producing powerful, tannic wines capable of long ageing. It is blended with Merlot, Cabernet Franc and sometimes Petit Verdot. The highlights of the Médoc are the four communes of St- Estèphe (blackcurrant concentration); classical, cedarwood and cigar-box Pauillac; richly-fruited St Julien; and elegant, fragrant Margaux.

On the Right Bank, most famously in St-Emilion and Pomerol, it is the fleshy Merlot grape which prevails, sometimes supported by Cabernet Franc. Here the soils are more mixed, with gravel and clay underpinning the rich, fruity wines of Pomerol. Styles vary more in St-Emilion, depending on the predominance of sand in the lower-lying slopes, or limestone on the hillsides and plateau. 

By the 18th century, individual properties - known as châteaux, however humble - were becoming known for the quality of their wines and in 1855, those of the Médoc (plus Haut-Brion, a property commended by Samuel Pepys as early as 1663) were classified into five levels of classed growths. Lafite, Latour, Margaux and Haut Brion were cited as First Growths, to whose ranks Mouton Rothschild was elevated by presidential decree in 1973. Beneath the ranks of the classed growths lies a raft of fine châteaux known as Crus Bourgeois, while a host of less well-known "petits châteaux" still makes attractive, enjoyable Claret at affordable prices.

The other jewel in the Bordeaux crown is the district of Sauternes, making some of the most outstanding sweet white wines in the world (from the likes of Châteaux d'Yquem, Rieussec and Climens). The foggy autumn mornings along the banks of the Garonne River near Sauternes and neighbouring Barsac enable the noble rot, botrytis cinerea, to form on the skins of the grapes, which can still ripen in the afternoon sun as late as the end of October or early November. The Sémillon grape is the prime component, but Sauvignon Blanc and a little Muscadelle are also planted to provide insurance if the weather is less favourable to Sémillon, as well as offering a counterpoint in flavour.

There are many inexpensive dry white wines - more Sauvignon than Sémillon - from regions such as Entre-Deux-Mers and Graves, with just a handful of outstanding properties located in Pessac-Léognan. The most famous of the great dry whites hail from Châteaux Haut Brion, Laville Haut Brion and Domaine de Chevalier.

The finer wines of Bordeaux are sold en primeur in the late spring following the harvest, some two years before the wines are ready for physical delivery. The châteaux offer their wines through a system of Bordeaux négociants (brokers) who sell them on to importers round the world. Prices vary enormously from one vintage to another, dependent on perceived quality and world demand, which shows no signs of diminishing, especially for the great years.

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Sauv.Blanc & Sémillon

Sauv.Blanc & Sémillon

The blend used for White Graves and Sauternes and rarely encountered outside France. In the great dry whites of Graves, Sauvignon Blanc tends to predominate in the blend, although properties such as Smith Haut Lafite use 100% Sauvignon Blanc while others such as Laville Haut Brion have as much as 60% Sémillon in their final blends. Sauvignon Blanc wines can lose their freshness and fruit after a couple of years in bottle - if blended with Sémillon, then the latter bolsters the wine when the initial fruit from the Sauvignon fades. Ultimately Sauvignon Blanc gives the wine its aroma and raciness while Sémillon gives it backbone and longevity.

In Sauternes, Sémillon is dominant, with Sauvignon Blanc playing a supporting role - it is generally harvested about 10 days before Sémillon and the botrytis concentrates its sweetness and dampens Sauvignon Blanc`s naturally pungent aroma. It contributes acidity, zip and freshness to Sauternes and is an important component of the blend.

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