2016 Puligny-Montrachet, Les Aubues, Domaine Jean-Claude Bachelet, Burgundy

2016 Puligny-Montrachet, Les Aubues, Domaine Jean-Claude Bachelet, Burgundy

Product: 20161171484
2016 Puligny-Montrachet, Les Aubues, Domaine Jean-Claude Bachelet, Burgundy

Description

Unfortunately, the proximity of this vineyard to Chassagne means it was in the path of frost damage and production is down by half. It’s a wine of tingling minerality, with a zingy, citrus feel and delicate floral character, thanks to the well-drained, stony soil. Currently very nervy but will fill out with another winter in barrel. Drink 2019-2025.
Adam Bruntlett, Burgundy Buyer

With the move to superb new cellars in the hamlet of Gamay, next to St Aubin, Benoît and Jean-Baptiste Bachelet have taken over from their father Jean-Claude, though he may still be seen with his wartime vintage truck ferrying the grapes at harvest time. The basic principles of a long slow barrelageing for almost two years remain in force, while the state-of-the-art winery has improved consistency. In the vineyard, the brothers have been experimenting with biodynamic viticulture and have plans to extend this across their holdings which are in St Aubin, Chassagne-Montrachet and Puligny-Montrachet. With vineyards mostly located in St Aubin and Chassagne-Montrachet, the Bachelet brothers – Benoît and Jean-Baptiste – had a torrid time in 2016 thanks to the frost, losing 75 percent of their crop. Despite the terrible spring weather and resultant disease pressure, they stuck to their biodynamic methods. The crop was so small, in fact, that they had to fill 44 unused barrels with water and sulphur dioxide to keep them fresh until they get another decent crop. There is no Chatenière in 2016 and many of the other cuvées are very small indeed.
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About this WINE

Jean-Claude Bachelet

Jean-Claude Bachelet

Jean-Claude Bachelet used to sell the majority of his crop to négociants. Nowadays the estate bottles virtually all of its wines and is considered as one of the most conscientious wine producers in Saint-Aubin. His sons Benoit and Jean-Baptiste are now involved and there has been a further step up in quality and consistency.

Jean-Claude Bachelet's estate has holdings in Saint-Aubin, Chassagne-Montrachet, Puligny Montrachet and Bienvenues-Bâtard-Montrachet.

The white wines are matured in wooden barriques, of which around 10% are new. Bachelet's wines are exceptionally well balanced and display understated citrus and mineral characteristics. They possess good medium-term ageing potential.

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Puligny Montrachet

Puligny Montrachet

Puligny was one of two villages (along with Chassagne) which gained permission in 1879 to hyphenate the name of its most famous vineyard, Montrachet, to its own.

The reputation of Puligny-Montrachet is based around its four Grands Crus. Montrachet labels often boast a noble, triumphant ‘Le’ in front of its name, lest you dare confuse it with any lesser wine. It has much to be proud of, with many considering Montrachet to be the greatest white wine in the world. At its best it has an intensity, complexity and elegance that make you wonder how such a wine could be made from mere grapes.

The luxurious and explosive Chevalier-Montrachet is not quite as deep, although it is probably the next best. Only marginally less impressive, and rather more consistent than Montrachet is the richly textured Bâtard-Montrachet (also shared with Chassagne). Bienvenues-Bâtard-Montrachet is equally good, with the focus on honeyed finesse and exquisite balance rather than richness.

These legendary wines are supported by a host of fabulous Premier Cru vineyards capable of reaching Grand Cru quality. Brimming with flavour and intensity, Le Cailleret and Les Pucelles (which both lie across the road from Le Montrachet) are prime candidates, along with Les Demoiselles, Les Combettes and Folatières.

Sandwiched between the larger Chassagne and Meursault, Puligny produces wines that are more striking than any in the Côte d’Or, portraying a floral elegance alongside a stylish, steely concentration. They are very different to Meursault: more refined and delicate, and less rich.

Village level Puligny-Montrachet from top growers can be very good indeed, but is all too often unexciting and disappointing. Grands Crus normally need at least eight years before they can be broached, and last for 20 or more. Premiers Crus should generally be enjoyed between five and 15 years of age; village wines from three to 10 years.

In theory, you can find red Puligny-Montrachet, but it scarcely exists anymore, and is rarely worth the price tag.

  • 114 hectares of village Puligny-Montrachet
  • 100 hectares of Premier Cru vineyards (17 in all). The best vineyards include Les Demoiselles, Le Cailleret, Les Pucelles, Les Combettes, Les Folatières
  • 21 hectares of Grand Cru vineyards: Le Montrachet (part), Chevalier-Montrachet, Bâtard-Montrachet (part), Bienvenues-Bâtard-Montrachet
  • Recommended Producers: LeflaiveCarillon
  • Recommended Restaurant: Le Montrachet (excellent cuisine and good wine list; also an hotel)

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Chardonnay

Chardonnay

Chardonnay is the "Big Daddy" of white wine grapes and one of the most widely planted in the world. It is suited to a wide variety of soils, though it excels in soils with a high limestone content as found in Champagne, Chablis, and the Côte D`Or.

Burgundy is Chardonnay's spiritual home and the best White Burgundies are dry, rich, honeyed wines with marvellous poise, elegance and balance. They are unquestionably the finest dry white wines in the world. Chardonnay plays a crucial role in the Champagne blend, providing structure and finesse, and is the sole grape in Blanc de Blancs.

It is quantitatively important in California and Australia, is widely planted in Chile and South Africa, and is the second most widely planted grape in New Zealand. In warm climates Chardonnay has a tendency to develop very high sugar levels during the final stages of ripening and this can occur at the expense of acidity. Late picking is a common problem and can result in blowsy and flabby wines that lack structure and definition.

Recently in the New World, we have seen a move towards more elegant, better- balanced and less oak-driven Chardonnays, and this is to be welcomed.

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Reviews

Customer reviews

Wine Advocate89-91/100

Critic reviews

Wine Advocate89-91/100
The 2016 Puligny-Montrachet Les Aubeus, the lieu-dit in the middle of Enseigneres, has a fresh, peppermint-tinged bouquet that is a delight. The palate is well balanced with a fine thread of acidity, nicely balanced with a pert, spicy finish that leaves the mouth tingling afterwards. This is a very capable Puligny, and I prefer this to some of the more reputed Chassagne-Montrachets.
Neal Martin - 29/12/2017 Read more