2020 Côtes du Rhône Villages, Terre d'Argile, Domaine de la Janasse

2020 Côtes du Rhône Villages, Terre d'Argile, Domaine de la Janasse

Product: 20208015297
Prices start from £165.00 per case Buying options
2020 Côtes du Rhône Villages, Terre d'Argile, Domaine de la Janasse

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Available by the case In Bond. Pricing excludes duty and VAT, which must be paid separately before delivery. Storage charges apply.
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6 x 75cl bottle
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Description

This contains equal measures of Grenache, Syrah, Mourvèdre and Carignan from vines grown on clay soils just north of the Châteauneuf-du-Pape appellation. The palate shows nice richness, with fresh black cherries, blackberries and blackcurrants. A touch of smoke and violets bring an aromatic lift to the nose. This is a highly drinkable and well-balanced Côtes-du-Rhône.

Drink now to 2027

Georgina Haacke, Wine Buyer, Berry Bros. & Rudd (Mar 2022)

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Critics reviews

Jeb Dunnuck91-93/100
The 2020 Côtes du Rhône Villages Terre d'Argile, which comes from vines just north of Châteauneuf du Pape, is always a stunning Côtes du Rhône. In fact, there’s not many better out there. The 2020 shows the pure, lively style of the vintage as well as classic cassis and raspberry fruits supported by toasted spice and floral notes. It’s medium to full-bodied, balanced, and clearly an outstanding, impeccably made wine.

Jeb Dunnuck (February 2022) Read more

About this WINE

Domaine de la Janasse

Domaine de la Janasse

Brother-and-sister team Christophe and Isabelle Sabon continue to work wonders at Janasse – a domaine founded by their father, Aimé Sabon, in 1973. They now farm around 90 hectares, 18 of which are in Châteauneuf-du-Pape. These are dotted across numerous plots in the northeast of the appellation, in the commune of Courthézon, where the soils are more sandy and therefore much cooler. They also have a few parcels on the famous, clay soil plateau of La Crau. Grapes are largely de-stemmed; concrete tanks are used for the Grenache and old oak for the Syrah and Mourvèdre. In other words, everything is fairly traditional. While they have been farming largely in accordance with organic principals for years, they are now undergoing full conversion to organic and expect to gain certification in 2024.

Christophe says ’20 is a great vintage for freshness. He describes his wines this year as naturally elegant, possessing both power and refinement. It reminds him of his ’00 vintage, showing similar elegance, only a little more richness.

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Grenache/Garnacha

Grenache/Garnacha

Grenache (Noir) is widely grown and comes in a variety of styles. Believed to originate in Spain, it was, in the late 20th century, the most widely planted black grape variety in the world. Today it hovers around seventh in the pecking order. It tends to produce very fruity, rich wines that can range quite widely in their level of tannin.

In many regions – most famously the Southern Rhône, where it complements Syrah and Mourvèdre, among other grapes – it adds backbone and colour to blends, but some of the most notable Châteauneuf du Pape producers (such as Château Rayas) make 100 percent Grenache wines. The grape is a component in many wines of the Languedoc (where you’ll also find its lighter-coloured forms, Grenache Gris and Blanc) and is responsible for much southern French rosé – taking the lead in most Provence styles.

Found all over Spain as Garnacha Tinta (spelt Garnaxa in Catalonia), the grape variety is increasingly detailed on wine labels there. Along with Tempranillo, it forms the majority of the blend for Rioja’s reds and has been adopted widely in Navarra, where it produces lighter styles of red and rosado (rosé). It can also be found operating under a pseudonym, Cannonau, in Sardinia.

 

Beyond Europe, Grenache is widely planted in California and Australia, largely thanks to its ability to operate in high temperatures and without much water. Particularly in the Barossa Valley, there are some extraordinary dry-farmed bush vines, some of which are centuries old and produce wines of startling intensity.

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