2006 Bonnes-Mares, Grand Cru, Domaine Dujac, Burgundy

2006 Bonnes-Mares, Grand Cru, Domaine Dujac, Burgundy

Product: 20061030484
2006 Bonnes-Mares, Grand Cru, Domaine Dujac, Burgundy

Description

A beautifully nuanced and highly complex nose of mostly blue berry and cassis that is cool and pure slides seamlessly into surprisingly supple and relatively forward broad-shouldered flavors that possess even more depth than the nose, all wrapped into a finish supported by a firm tannic spine where the tannins are dense but fine. This is a first rate Bonnes Mares that will require plenty of time to reach its apogee because despite the accessible mid-palate, the finish is very tight. Comments: Do not Miss!
(Allen Meadows, burghound.com, Jan 01, 2008)

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Critics reviews

Burghound91-94/100
Wine Advocate93/100
Burghound91-94/100
A beautifully nuanced and highly complex nose of mostly blue berry and cassis that is cool and pure slides seamlessly into surprisingly supple and relatively forward broad-shouldered flavors that possess even more depth than the nose, all wrapped into a finish supported by a firm tannic spine where the tannins are dense but fine. This is a first rate Bonnes Mares that will require plenty of time to reach its apogee because despite the accessible mid-palate, the finish is very tight. Comments: Do not Miss!
(Allen Meadows, burghound.com, Jan 01, 2008) Read more
Wine Advocate93/100
Sweetly ripe black raspberry, pungently bitter-sweet herbal concentrate (bay, fennel, and horehound), buddleia perfume, and wood smoke vie for attention in the aromatic display of Dujac's 2006 Bonnes Mares. It exhibits a sweetness and concentration of primary fruit one rarely encounters in this vintage, yet it tones down the savagery of the site in its textural refinement and the sense of harmoniously entwined threads of fruit, herb, floral, and carnal flavors in a long finish that still doesn't lack for the sizzle of berry skin, citrus zest, and herbal bitter-sweetness. Where the corresponding Echezeaux displays vintage-typical virtues, this is something of an exception. I suspect it will also be exceptionally age-worthy in the context of its vintage, and probably worth following for at least a decade. Jeremy Seysses only destemmed a minority of his 2006 fruit, and in some appellations none. The results demonstrate that Dujac got things ripe not to mention right in a challenging vintage, with a collection that need not fear comparison with 2005 at this address. (Perhaps, if anything, 2005 ought to look to its laurels!) The team here started picking only on September 23, and then very meticulously and selectively. Clos de la Roche, for example, was picked in two passes nearly a week apart. The top wines came in at between 13 and 13.5% natural alcohol, with minimal chaptalization employed in some instances to extend fermentation. Color and flavor extraction was easy, says Seysses, and we did more punch-downs than in 2005, because we felt quite confident of our material. The fruit is fresh and crisp, but not green, and we had no jamminess. It was just right. There's very little to complain about. Indeed!
David Schildknecht - 22/12/2009 Read more

About this WINE

Dujac

Dujac

Jacques Seysses created Domaine Dujac in 1967 having decided to turn his passion into his vocation. He purchased, a somewhat rundown, Domaine Graillet in Morey-St Denis and quickly turned things around to make a showstopping debut with the 1969 vintage.

This is every bit the family business. Jacques’ wife Rosalind arrived from California to work the harvest and never left. They married in 1974 and today their sons Jeremy and Alec, together with Jeremy’s wife Diana, run the estate day to day. They remain under the watchful eye of their parents.

Diana is another Californian and alumna of UC Davis where her fondness for hard labour in the winery earned her the nickname “Señorita Macho”. She has been winemaker since 2003 and at her family’s estate on the other side of the world in Napa since 2005.

The combination of ‘New World’ innovation and Burgundian tradition at Dujac has proved to be a powerhouse. This energetic and enormously talented family have made this domaine one of the most admired and sought-after wine producers in the world.

Jacques first purchase was a small estate of 5ha, which today has grown to around 17ha. The jewels of the domaine are the seven plots in Grand Crus. Away from these exalted sites there are impeccable village vineyards and magnificent 1er crus, including Aux Combottes in Gevrey and Les Malconsorts in Vosne. Both of which are immediate neighbours of Grand Crus and produce extraordinary wines.

Jacques and Rosalind began running the vineyards according to the principles of lutte raisonée (where minimal chemicals are used) in 1987. Working consistently towards a more natural approach, in 2001 they experimented with organic viticulture in 4ha of their prime sites. Then adding biodynamic farming principles to the repertoire in 2003. They were so encouraged by the results in the bottle they made the switch to organic for the entire estate in 2008, earning certification in 2011.

Their intensive work to create a natural and varied ecosystem is driven by their belief that the health of the soil is the key to unlocking great quality and producing more expressive wines.

The evolution of the winemaking at Dujac has been guided by the principle that the largest imprint on the wines should be from the vineyards themselves. The approach is all about simplicity. The use of whole bunches in fermentation is a distinctive feature here and something for which Jacques has been a leading advocate. Jeremy feels that they add complexity and give silkier tannins, but they must be ripe so the approach is carefully adjusted according to the vintage.

In the winery they have sought to reduce manipulation wherever possible. After crushing the must is gravity fed into the cellar, avoiding the need for pumping which can exert too much force on the nascent wine. They have also been able to regulate alcohol and malolactic fermentations more precisely with improved temperature control.

Dujac’s wines are not renowned as the most powerful and nor do they want them to be. These are wines of polished finesse and restraint, elegant aromatics, and depth of fruit. They are nothing short of beguiling.

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Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir is probably the most frustrating, and at times infuriating, wine grape in the world. However when it is successful, it can produce some of the most sublime wines known to man. This thin-skinned grape which grows in small, tight bunches performs well on well-drained, deepish limestone based subsoils as are found on Burgundy's Côte d'Or.

Pinot Noir is more susceptible than other varieties to over cropping - concentration and varietal character disappear rapidly if yields are excessive and yields as little as 25hl/ha are the norm for some climats of the Côte d`Or.

Because of the thinness of the skins, Pinot Noir wines are lighter in colour, body and tannins. However the best wines have grip, complexity and an intensity of fruit seldom found in wine from other grapes. Young Pinot Noir can smell almost sweet, redolent with freshly crushed raspberries, cherries and redcurrants. When mature, the best wines develop a sensuous, silky mouth feel with the fruit flavours deepening and gamey "sous-bois" nuances emerging.

The best examples are still found in Burgundy, although Pinot Noir`s key role in Champagne should not be forgotten. It is grown throughout the world with notable success in the Carneros and Russian River Valley districts of California, and the Martinborough and Central Otago regions of New Zealand.

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