2016 St Aubin Blanc, 1er Cru, Méo-Camuzet Frère et Soeurs, Burgundy

2016 St Aubin Blanc, 1er Cru, Méo-Camuzet Frère et Soeurs, Burgundy

Product: 20161579046
 
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2016 St Aubin Blanc, 1er Cru, Méo-Camuzet Frère et Soeurs, Burgundy

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This product is discounted by 30% in our Summer Sale. Price shown includes discount.

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About this WINE

Meo-Camuzet

Meo-Camuzet

Méo-Camuzet is one of the undisputed star estates of Burgundy. Until 1988 most of the domaine's holdings were leased out to other vignerons and amazingly most of the wine was sold off to négociants in bulk. Today, it is a very different story.

Meo Camuzet now has over 2.5 hectares of grands Crus and 8 hectares of some of the finest Premier Cru vineyards of Nuits-St-Georges and Vosne-Romanée. Most of the vineyards are farmed organically, but not every aspect of all vineyards: one or two which are difficult for tractor access may still see an occasional herbicide or anti-rot treatment.
 
The grapes are sorted at the winery, destemmed, cooled if need be to 15°C for a short pre-fermentation maceration, and then spend around 18 days in vat in total,, with temperatures being maintained around 30-32°C. Early on the juice is pumped over twice a day with some pumping down subsequently. Afterwards, the wines are matured in barrel, with 50% of new wood for the major villages, 60-70% for the premiers crus and 100% for the grands crus. Possibly a little less new wood may be used in the future, and Jean-Nicolas has certainly refined his choice of wood in recent years, while retaining François Frères as more or less sole supplier.

Jean-Nicolas Méo and Christian Faurois now run the Domaine and together they produce some of the very best wine in the Côte d'Or. Meo Camuzet produces full-bodied, firm, rich, oaky, concentrated wines, which no serious Burgundy drinker should overlook.

Before the current incumbent, there are two major names associated with this great Vosne-Romanée domaine. The first is Etienne Camuzet, a political figure who was deputy for the Côte d’Or from 1902 to 1932, and who purchased during his life some significant vineyard holdings as well as the Château de Clos de Vougeot, which he later gave to the Confrérie des Chevaliers du Tastevin. His name frequently appears in litigation to decide which parcels of vineyard might or might not be included as part of a grand cru.
 
His vineyard holding passed to a daughter, Maria Noirot, who died childless, and thence in 1959 to a more distant relative, Jean Méo. At this stage the vineyards were looked after by sharecroppers and the wine sold off in bulk. Domaine-bottling only began in 1985 and reached full throttle with the arrival of Jean-Nicolas Méo to take charge in 1989. The various sharecropping agreements have now come to an end (the last being Jean Tardy in 2007) with one of the former sharecroppers, Christian Faurois, remaining as Jean-Nicolas Méo’s right-hand man in the vines.
 
The second great personality is of course Henri Jayer, who was invited to look after the Camuzet vines as long ago as World War II, though not having been involved in the business before. Jayer remained a sharecropper until his (first) retirement in 1988, after which he continued to advise the domaine.
 
Jasper Morris MW, Burgundy Wine Director and author of the award-winning Inside Burgundy comprehensive handbook.

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Bourgogne Blanc

Bourgogne Blanc


Bourgogne Blanc is the appellation used to refer to generic white wines from Burgundy, a wide term which allows 384 separate villages to produce a white wine with the label ‘Bourgogne.’ As a result of this variety, Bourgogne Blanc is very hard to characterise with a single notable style, however the wines are usually dominated by the presence of Chardonnay, which is just about the only common factor between them. That being said, Chardonnay itself varies based on the environmental factors, so every bottle of Bourgogne Blanc will vary in some way from the next! Pinot Blanc and Pinot Gris are also permitted for use in Bourgogne Blanc under the regulations of the appellation.

As Bourgogne Blanc is very much an entry-level white wine for most regions in Burgundy, prices are usually very reasonable, and due to the terroir and climate of Burgundy, Bourgogne Blanc wines tend to have a strong acidity to them, combined with a vibrant and often fruity palate when compared with other whites from the New World, say, allowing fantastic matchmaking with many different kinds of food.

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Chardonnay

Chardonnay

Chardonnay is the "Big Daddy" of white wine grapes and one of the most widely planted in the world. It is suited to a wide variety of soils, though it excels in soils with a high limestone content as found in Champagne, Chablis, and the Côte D`Or.

Burgundy is Chardonnay's spiritual home and the best White Burgundies are dry, rich, honeyed wines with marvellous poise, elegance and balance. They are unquestionably the finest dry white wines in the world. Chardonnay plays a crucial role in the Champagne blend, providing structure and finesse, and is the sole grape in Blanc de Blancs.

It is quantitatively important in California and Australia, is widely planted in Chile and South Africa, and is the second most widely planted grape in New Zealand. In warm climates Chardonnay has a tendency to develop very high sugar levels during the final stages of ripening and this can occur at the expense of acidity. Late picking is a common problem and can result in blowsy and flabby wines that lack structure and definition.

Recently in the New World, we have seen a move towards more elegant, better- balanced and less oak-driven Chardonnays, and this is to be welcomed.

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