2020 Bourgogne Hautes-Côtes de Nuits Blanc, Domaine A.-F. Gros

2020 Bourgogne Hautes-Côtes de Nuits Blanc, Domaine A.-F. Gros

Product: 20208148720
Prices start from £33.00 per bottle (75cl). Buying options
2020 Bourgogne Hautes-Côtes de Nuits Blanc, Domaine A.-F. Gros

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Description

Ultra-fresh if ripe aromas of pretty and nicely layered red berries give way to delicious middle weight flavors that exude a touch of minerality on the ever-so-mildly rustic finale. This is potentially quite good for its level.

2023+

Allen Meadows, Burghound.com (Jan 2022)

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Critics reviews

Burghound86-89/100
Ultra-fresh if ripe aromas of pretty and nicely layered red berries give way to delicious middle weight flavors that exude a touch of minerality on the ever-so-mildly rustic finale. This is potentially quite good for its level.

2023+

Allen Meadows, Burghound.com (Jan 2022) Read more

About this WINE

Domaine A-F Gros

Domaine A-F Gros

Anne-Françoise Gros, originally of Vosne-Romanée, is married to François Parent of Pommard, where they live, though their wines have been made in substantial premises in Beaune since 1998. Their joint living as wine-makers is ably assisted by their children Caroline (pictured) and Mathieu. 

The domaine consists of Anne-Françoise’s share of Domaine Jean Gros, additional wines in and around Vosne-Romanée which she has bought or leased, and her husband’s share of Domaine Parent. He also offers wines under his own label, adorned with a black truffle. Her labels sport the outline of a female head, each one different according to the interpretation of the style of the appellation by Anne-Françoise and the artist.
 
There has been a sorting table since 2008, after which the grapes are destemmed but not crushed. The grapes are given a short cool maceration, then fermented with more pumping over than punching down, with the juice being concentrated by a similar machine to that used by Michel and Bernard Gros, if necessary.

Jasper Morris MW, Burgundy Wine Director and author of the award-winning Inside Burgundy comprehensive handbook.

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Bourgogne Rouge

Bourgogne Rouge


Bourgogne Rouge is the term used to apply to red wines from Burgundy that fall under the generic Bourgogne AOC, which can be produced by over 350 individual villages across the region. As with Bourgogne Blanc and Bourgogne Rosé, this is a very general appellation and thus is hard to pinpoint any specific characteristics of the wine as a whole, due to the huge variety of wines produced.
 
Around 4,600 acres of land across Burgundy are used to produce Bourgogne Rouge, which is around twice as much as is dedicated towards the production of generic whites.
 
Pinot Noir is the primary grape used in Bourgogne Rouge production, although Chardonnay, Pinot Blanc, Pinot Gris and in Yonne, César grapes are all also permitted to make up the rest of the wine. These wines tend to be focused and acidic, with the fruit less cloying than in some New World wines also made from Pinot Noir, and they develop more floral notes as they age.

Although an entry-level wine, some Bourgogne Rouges can be exquisite depending on the area and producer, and yet at a very affordable price.

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Chardonnay

Chardonnay

Chardonnay is the "Big Daddy" of white wine grapes and one of the most widely planted in the world. It is suited to a wide variety of soils, though it excels in soils with a high limestone content as found in Champagne, Chablis, and the Côte D`Or.

Burgundy is Chardonnay's spiritual home and the best White Burgundies are dry, rich, honeyed wines with marvellous poise, elegance and balance. They are unquestionably the finest dry white wines in the world. Chardonnay plays a crucial role in the Champagne blend, providing structure and finesse, and is the sole grape in Blanc de Blancs.

It is quantitatively important in California and Australia, is widely planted in Chile and South Africa, and is the second most widely planted grape in New Zealand. In warm climates Chardonnay has a tendency to develop very high sugar levels during the final stages of ripening and this can occur at the expense of acidity. Late picking is a common problem and can result in blowsy and flabby wines that lack structure and definition.

Recently in the New World, we have seen a move towards more elegant, better- balanced and less oak-driven Chardonnays, and this is to be welcomed.

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