Red, Ready, but will improve

2006 Bonnes-Mares, Grand Cru, Domaine Dujac

2006 Bonnes-Mares, Grand Cru, Domaine Dujac

Red | Ready, but will improve | Dujac | Code:  2144 | 2006 | France > Burgundy > Cote de Nuits > Chambolle Musigny | Pinot Noir | Medium-Full Bodied, Dry | 13.0 % alcohol

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Scores and Reviews

BURGHOUND

91-94/100

WA

93/100

BURGHOUND - A beautifully nuanced and highly complex nose of mostly blue berry and cassis that is cool and pure slides seamlessly into surprisingly supple and relatively forward broad-shouldered flavors that possess even more depth than the nose, all wrapped into a finish supported by a firm tannic spine where the tannins are dense but fine. This is a first rate Bonnes Mares that will require plenty of time to reach its apogee because despite the accessible mid-palate, the finish is very tight. Comments: Do not Miss!
(Allen Meadows, burghound.com, Jan 01, 2008)

WA - Sweetly ripe black raspberry, pungently bitter-sweet herbal concentrate (bay, fennel, and horehound), buddleia perfume, and wood smoke vie for attention in the aromatic display of Dujac's 2006 Bonnes Mares. It exhibits a sweetness and concentration of primary fruit one rarely encounters in this vintage, yet it tones down the savagery of the site in its textural refinement and the sense of harmoniously entwined threads of fruit, herb, floral, and carnal flavors in a long finish that still doesn't lack for the sizzle of berry skin, citrus zest, and herbal bitter-sweetness. Where the corresponding Echezeaux displays vintage-typical virtues, this is something of an exception. I suspect it will also be exceptionally age-worthy in the context of its vintage, and probably worth following for at least a decade. Jeremy Seysses only destemmed a minority of his 2006 fruit, and in some appellations none. The results demonstrate that Dujac got things ripe not to mention right in a challenging vintage, with a collection that need not fear comparison with 2005 at this address. (Perhaps, if anything, 2005 ought to look to its laurels!) The team here started picking only on September 23, and then very meticulously and selectively. Clos de la Roche, for example, was picked in two passes nearly a week apart. The top wines came in at between 13 and 13.5% natural alcohol, with minimal chaptalization employed in some instances to extend fermentation. Color and flavor extraction was easy, says Seysses, and we did more punch-downs than in 2005, because we felt quite confident of our material. The fruit is fresh and crisp, but not green, and we had no jamminess. It was just right. There's very little to complain about. Indeed!
David Schildknecht - 22/12/2009

The Producer

Dujac

Dujac

Domaine Dujac in Burgundy was acquired by Jacques Seysses in 1967. The domaine in Morey-St-Denis had 4 hectares of vineyards and he has subsequently built it up to 11.5 hectares. Domaine Dujac now includes holdings in Clos de la Roche, Clos St-Denis, Bonnes-Mares, Echézeaux and Charmes-Chambertin . "Use knowledge and technology to counter accidents - for example, bad weather - but, if all is going well, don't interfere," says Seysses and this principle guides much of what happens in the vineyards and the cellars. Dujac wines are neither filtered nor fined and all of his premiers and grands crus are aged in 100% new oak. These are wines of the very highest order.

The first vintage, 1968, was one of the worst years on record so the wines were sold off in bulk, but 1969 was an entirely different matter, putting the domaine firmly on the map. In 1973 Jacques married Rosalind Boswell, a Californian girl who came to work the vintage and stayed for life. The first two of their three children, Jeremy (born 1975), Alec (1977) and Paul (1980) are now involved in the business, as is Jeremy’s wife Diana, also Californian, and a trained oenologist. In 2000 Jeremy Seysses also inaugurated, with his father, a small scale negociant business known as Dujac Fils et Père.
 
The domaine has expanded over the years as additional parcels of vineyard became available, culminating in the acquisition of some exceptional vineyards from Domaine Thomas-Moillard in 2005. In 1987 the domaine moved to lutte raisonée, the reasoned application of treatments, and from 2001 to organic farming. Today 75% of the domaine, including all premier and grand cru vineyards, is farmed organically with experiments also along biodynamic lines.
 
Jacques Seysses is a leading advocate of including stems in the fermentation process, as much so as to avoid bruising the grapes during the de-stemming process as for a desire to include the stems themselves. However each vintage is treated according to its merits and the ripeness of the stems.
 
The cellars in Morey St Denis have been extended in recent years to improve cellaring conditions. The barrels can now be kept at a cooler ambient temperature, enabling the malolactic fermentation to happen later and for the wines to be racked less frequently.
 
Dujac wines are not necessarily the deepest in colour but are noted for their exceptional fragrance, structure and longevity. With seven grands crus in the stable, Dujac is today one of Burgundy’s leading domaines.

Jasper Morris MW, Burgundy Wine Director and author of the award-winning Inside Burgundy comprehensive handbook.

The Grape

Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir is probably the most frustrating, and at times infuriating, wine grape in the world. However when it is successful, it can produce some of the most sublime wines known to man. This thin-skinned grape which grows in small, tight bunches performs well on well-drained, deepish limestone based subsoils as are found on Burgundy's Côte d'Or.

Pinot Noir is more susceptible than other varieties to over cropping - concentration and varietal character disappear rapidly if yields are excessive and yields as little as 25hl/ha are the norm for some climats of the Côte d`Or.

Because of the thinness of the skins, Pinot Noir wines are lighter in colour, body and tannins. However the best wines have grip, complexity and an intensity of fruit seldom found in wine from other grapes. Young Pinot Noir can smell almost sweet, redolent with freshly crushed raspberries, cherries and redcurrants. When mature, the best wines develop a sensuous, silky mouth feel with the fruit flavours deepening and gamey "sous-bois" nuances emerging.

The best examples are still found in Burgundy, although Pinot Noir`s key role in Champagne should not be forgotten. It is grown throughout the world with notable success in the Carneros and Russian River Valley districts of California, and the Martinborough and Central Otago regions of New Zealand.

The Region

Chambolle Musigny

Chambolle produces the most elegant wines in the Côte de Nuits, having more active chalk and less clay in the soil than the other villages. The wines may be a little lighter in colour and less tannic than Gevrey-Chambertin but they have a sublime concentration of fruit. Village Chambolle-Musigny usually provides excellent value.

Le Musigny is one of the top half-dozen vineyards in Burgundy, producing wines of extraordinary intensity and yet with a magical velvety character. Les Amoureuses is immediately appealing, a wonderfully sensual wine which deserves Grand Cru status. Bonnes Mares tends to have a firmer structure and ages very well

  • 94 hectares of village Chambolle-Musigny.
  • 61 hectares of Premier Cru vineyards (24 in all). The finest vineyards include Les Amoureuses, Les Charmes, Les Fuées, Les Baudes and Sentiers.
  • 24 hectares of Grand Cru vineyard - Bonnes Mares and Le Musigny.
  • Recommended producers:  de Vogüé, Mugnier, Roumier, Barthod.
  • Recommended restaurant: Le Chambolle 

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