2022 Carillon d'Angélus, St Emilion, Bordeaux

2022 Carillon d'Angélus, St Emilion, Bordeaux

Product: 20228124979
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2022 Carillon d'Angélus, St Emilion, Bordeaux

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Description

Now made in its own winery and no longer a second wine, Carillon is a blend from three distinct terroirs across 18 hectares. Each ripens at different times, with the objective of showing different nuances of Merlot. Although the ageing is 60% in new barrels, this is not at all evident in the wine, which is bright and composed. It is much more expressive of red fruits than the grand vin and has a hint of tobacco. As such it has more flesh on the palate and the tannins are nicely grained.

Drink 2026 - 2038

Score: 16/20

Berry Bros. & Rudd (April 2023)

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Critics reviews

Jane Anson94/100
Vivid ruby red fruits, smoked caramel and mint leaf underline the personality and definition of this wine, setting it apart from Château Angélus in a way that has been increasingly apparent over recent vintages, reflecting its separate vineayrds, and clearly different blending. Has a luscious quality without being overdone, with concentrated sage and rosemary spice. 60% new oak, 18ha dedicated plots, Harvest September 6 to 28. Just over 10% of the Château Bellevue plots are now in Carillon (so around 0.5ha), and the vinification saw double the usual time for cold soaking at no more than 2C to keep focus on fruit, never going over 22C during the fermentation itself.

Jane Anson, janeanson.com (May 2023) Read more
Jancis Robinson MW16.5+/20
Precise in execution, the aroma lifted and refined, the texture of tannin pure and exact. Nothing overblown, the fruit remaining juicy. Harmonious. Drink 2028 – 2038

Jancis Robinson MW, jancisrobinson.com (May 2023) Read more
Wine Advocate91-93/100

Unfurling in the glass with notions of raspberries, red plums, sweet soil tones and truffle, the 2022 Le Carillon d'Angélus is medium to full-bodied, fleshy and vibrant, with powdery tannins and a long, saline finish. As readers will remember, this bottling is no longer a "second wine" per se, but rather draws on some 25 hectares of dedicated vineyards, emphasizing Merlot from the cool terroirs of Saint-Christophe-des-Bardes, complemented by holdings in the gravelly Figeac sector and on clay soils near Angélus itself—with anything that doesn't make the cut relegated to the No. 3 d'Angélus.

Wine Advocate (April 2023)

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About this WINE

Château Angélus

Château Angélus

Château Angélus is one of the largest and most prestigious estates in St Emilion. It was promoted to Premier Grand Cru Classé A status in the 2012 reclassification. The de Boüard family has made wine here since 1782. The estate is now run by eighth-generation Stéphanie de Boüard-Rivoal, who took over from her father, Hubert de Boüard de Laforest, and uncle, Jean-Bernard Grenié, in 2012. It is located in centre-west of the St Emilion appellation, due west of the medieval town.

Angélus’s 39 hectares of vineyards are situated less than a kilometre away from the famous St Emilion steeple. The site enjoys a perfect southerly-exposed slope. Cabernet Franc is grown at the bottom, where the soils are sandier and warmer; Merlot is grown in the limestone-rich clay soils at the top of the slope.

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St-Emilion

St-Emilion

St Emilion is one of Bordeaux's largest producing appellations, producing more wine than Listrac, Moulis, St Estèphe, Pauillac, St Julien and Margaux put together. St Emilion has been producing wine for longer than the Médoc but its lack of accessibility to Bordeaux's port and market-restricted exports to mainland Europe meant the region initially did not enjoy the commercial success that funded the great châteaux of the Left Bank. 

St Emilion itself is the prettiest of Bordeaux's wine towns, perched on top of the steep limestone slopes upon which many of the region's finest vineyards are situated. However, more than half of the appellation's vineyards lie on the plain between the town and the Dordogne River on sandy, alluvial soils with a sprinkling of gravel. 

Further diversity is added by a small, complex gravel bed to the north-east of the region on the border with Pomerol.  Atypically for St Emilion, this allows Cabernet Franc and, to a lesser extent, Cabernet Sauvignon to prosper and defines the personality of the great wines such as Ch. Cheval Blanc.  

In the early 1990s there was an explosion of experimentation and evolution, leading to the rise of the garagistes, producers of deeply-concentrated wines made in very small quantities and offered at high prices.  The appellation is also surrounded by four satellite appellations, Montagne, Lussac, Puisseguin and St. Georges, which enjoy a family similarity but not the complexity of the best wines.

St Emilion was first officially classified in 1954, and is the most meritocratic classification system in Bordeaux, as it is regularly amended. The most recent revision of the classification was in 2012

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Merlot/Cabernet Franc

Merlot/Cabernet Franc

Merlot and Cabernet Franc are grape varieties commonly used in Bordeaux-style blends, particularly in the Bordeaux region of France. When these two grapes are blended, they can create a wine that combines the best characteristics of each variety.

Merlot is known for its smoothness, soft tannins, and ripe fruit flavours. It often contributes black cherry, plum, and chocolate flavours to the blend. The grapes are relatively easy to grow and ripen earlier than other Bordeaux varieties, making them versatile for blending.

Cabernet Franc, on the other hand, adds structure, depth, and complexity to the blend. It typically brings aromas of red fruits such as raspberry and strawberry, along with herbal notes like bell pepper and tobacco. These grapes have thinner skins and can be more challenging to cultivate, requiring specific growing conditions to reach their full potential.

When Merlot and Cabernet Franc are combined, the result is a well-balanced wine with various flavours and aromas. The blend often exhibits a Bordeaux wine's medium to full body, along with a smooth texture and moderate tannins. The specific flavour profile can vary depending on the proportions of each grape in the blend and the terroir and winemaking techniques employed.

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