2020 Château Quintus, St Emilion, Bordeaux

2020 Château Quintus, St Emilion, Bordeaux

Product: 20208113632
Prices start from £462.00 per case Buying options
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2020 Château Quintus, St Emilion, Bordeaux

Description

Exuberant and confident, with powerful damson and black cherry fruit flavours on the nose. Chocolate and liquorice run through the palate from beginning to end, and this is full of signature St-Emilion glamour. It has a round and supple texture through the mid palate, but the alcohol hides some of the limestone nuance at this point - it will no doubt emerge more clearly with 8 to 10 years in bottle. Harvest 11th September for the Merlot grapes and 23rd September for the Cabernet Franc.

Drink 2029 - 2044

Jane Anson, Decanter (April 2021)

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Case format
Availability
Price per case
6 x 75cl bottle
Berry Bros. & Rudd BB&R 41 cases £462.00
En Primeur Limited availability
En Primeur Limited availability

Critics reviews

Jane Anson93/100
Antonio Galloni, Vinous92-94/100
Neal Martin, Vinous92-94/100
Wine Advocate95-97/100
Jancis Robinson MW16.5+/20
James Suckling97-98/100
Jeb Dunnuck94-96/100
Michael Schuster92-93/100
Jane Anson93/100
Exuberant and confident, with powerful damson and black cherry fruit flavours on the nose. Chocolate and liquorice run through the palate from beginning to end, and this is full of signature St-Emilion glamour. It has a round and supple texture through the mid palate, but the alcohol hides some of the limestone nuance at this point - it will no doubt emerge more clearly with 8 to 10 years in bottle. Harvest 11th September for the Merlot grapes and 23rd September for the Cabernet Franc.

Drink 2029 - 2044

Jane Anson, Decanter (April 2021) Read more
Antonio Galloni, Vinous92-94/100
The 2020 Quintus is wonderfully promising. Soft contours and generous fruit give it tons of immediate appeal. Blueberry, mocha, lavender, spice and new leather are some of the aromas and flavors that emerge over time. More than anything else, though, Quintus impresses with its harmony. The 2020 is one of the finest vintages I have tasted here.

Drink from 2028 to 2040

Antonio Galloni, Vinous (June 2021) Read more
Neal Martin, Vinous92-94/100
The 2020 Quintus is very delineated and focused on the nose, offering ebullient black cherries and raspberry fruit, crushed stone and a subtle marine element that develops with aeration; great energy here. The palate is medium-bodied with lithe tannins, a perfect line of acidity and just a slight bitterness that imparts the necessary tension and sapidity on the finish. This is a very suave Saint-Émilion that will be difficult to resist in its youth.

Drink from 2028 to 2045

Neal Martin, Vinous (May 2021) Read more
Wine Advocate95-97/100
The 2020 Quintus is a blend of 62.5% Merlot and 37.5% Cabernet Franc, weighing in with an alcohol of 15.4%. Displaying a deep purple-black color, it leaps from the glass with bold notes of crushed blackberries, boysenberries and stewed plums, plus suggestions of chocolate mint, clove oil, lilacs and star anise. The full-bodied palate is densely laden with rich black fruits and floral accents, framed by well-balanced acidity and finely grained tannins, finishing with great length and impressive energy. Judging from this barrel sample, this is the finest, most complex and complete Quintus yet—bravo!

Drink 2026 - 2050

Lisa Perrotti-Brown MW, Wine Advocate (May 2021) Read more
Jancis Robinson MW16.5+/20
Cask sample taken 13 April. Nice and fresh! 62.5% Merlot, 37.5% Cabernet Franc. Purplish crimson with a healthy glow. Much firmer somehow on the nose than most of the other wines from this appellation. Opulent palate entry but then very sophisticated drive. Distinctively focussed and much drier than most St-Émilions with limestone influence well in evidence. Already persistent. Lean, fresh tannins on the finish. Not in the rich camp but expressive in its own style.

Drink 2026 - 2040

Jancis Robinson MW, jancisrobinson.com (April 2021) Read more
James Suckling97-98/100
Wow. This is very chalky and salty with lots of mineral character. It shows lots of purple fruit and firm tannins. Racy and bright. Chewy yet fine tannins. Gorgeous. Gets better and better.

James Suckling, jamessuckling.com (April 2021) Read more
Jeb Dunnuck94-96/100
A big, velvety textured wine, especially in the vintage, the 2020 Château Quintus offers a gorgeous array of pure crème de cassis and black raspberry fruits as well as leafy herbs, graphite, and chocolate. These all carry to a full-bodied Saint-Emilion with a round, mouth-filling texture, ripe tannins, and a great finish. This estate has been firing on all cylinders of late, and this should be in the same realm as the 2016, 2018, and I suspect, the 2019.

Jeb Dunnuck, jebdunnuck.com (May 2021) Read more
Michael Schuster92-93/100
Refined and subtle to smell, Cabernet Franc finesse plus ripe blackberry Merlot; both full-bodied and refined, fresh in acidity, finely dry in tannin; pure and sweet in fruit, quite complex and aromatic, but it is also a touch fiery in impression (so, not exactly an “easy” mouthful), long across the palate, gently racy, mouthcoating, and with fine, sweet, fragrant length. Fine wine, but the tannins rendered a little harder and drier on the (warm) finish by the alcohol level. Refined St-Emilion in a very well-managed, but clear current “hot-year” style. 

Drink 2028 - 2040

Michael Schuster, The World of Fine Wine (May 2021) Read more

About this WINE

Chateau Quintus

Chateau Quintus

The Clarence Dillon family company acquired a beautiful estate in Saint-Emilion, and renamed it Château Quintus. An exceptional terroir that has been recognised as such for centuries. The estate naturally wraps around a high promontory which represents the end of the plateau of Saint-Emilion. The vineyard benefits from a majestic panarama extending towards the neighbouring village and across the entire Dordogne valley. It is in the place that, for time immemorial, a watch tower has stood to ensure the defence of the village of Saint-Emilion.

The originality of this extraordinary terroir lies in its diversity of soils, slopes and orientations. It is therefore hardly surprising that this wine was featured between 1844 and 1848 - under its old name Château Tertre Daugay - among the 14 most sought after and most expensive wines of Saint-Emilion. For close to a century the great reference book Cocks and Feret "Bordeaux et ses Vins" will consistently mention the property as a First Growth of Saint -Emilion. The vineyard was also one of the prominent Saint-Emilion estates to receive a gold medal at the Exposition Universelle de Paris in 1867.

A text found in another great book of the time "Les Grands Vins de Gironde" de Dumas et Lallemand (1899) reads "One can not imagine a more beautiful situation for an estate, or one more favourable for the production of a First Growth wine (...) Thanks to the excellent vinification practices undertaken at the estate, the wine produced here reflects great body, ripeness and an armature that exemplify the great wines of Saint-Emilion."

This wine takes its natural place alongside the red and white wines of Château Haut-Brion and Château La Mission Haut-Brion, thereby becoming the 5th child in this illustrious family.

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St-Emilion

St-Emilion

St Emilion is one of Bordeaux's largest producing appellations, producing more wine than Listrac, Moulis, St Estèphe, Pauillac, St Julien and Margaux put together. St Emilion has been producing wine for longer than the Médoc but its lack of accessibility to Bordeaux's port and market-restricted exports to mainland Europe meant the region initially did not enjoy the commercial success that funded the great châteaux of the Left Bank. 

St Emilion itself is the prettiest of Bordeaux's wine towns, perched on top of the steep limestone slopes upon which many of the region's finest vineyards are situated. However, more than half of the appellation's vineyards lie on the plain between the town and the Dordogne River on sandy, alluvial soils with a sprinkling of gravel. 

Further diversity is added by a small, complex gravel bed to the north-east of the region on the border with Pomerol.  Atypically for St Emilion, this allows Cabernet Franc and, to a lesser extent, Cabernet Sauvignon to prosper and defines the personality of the great wines such as Ch. Cheval Blanc.  

In the early 1990s there was an explosion of experimentation and evolution, leading to the rise of the garagistes, producers of deeply-concentrated wines made in very small quantities and offered at high prices.  The appellation is also surrounded by four satellite appellations, Montagne, Lussac, Puisseguin and St. Georges, which enjoy a family similarity but not the complexity of the best wines.

St Emilion was first officially classified in 1954, and is the most meritocratic classification system in Bordeaux, as it is regularly amended. The most recent revision of the classification was in 2012

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Merlot

Merlot

The most widely planted grape in Bordeaux and a grape that has been on a relentless expansion drive throughout the world in the last decade. Merlot is adaptable to most soils and is relatively simple to cultivate. It is a vigorous naturally high yielding grape that requires savage pruning - over-cropped Merlot-based wines are dilute and bland. It is also vital to pick at optimum ripeness as Merlot can quickly lose its varietal characteristics if harvested overripe.

In St.Emilion and Pomerol it withstands the moist clay rich soils far better than Cabernet grapes, and at it best produces opulently rich, plummy clarets with succulent fruitcake-like nuances. Le Pin, Pétrus and Clinet are examples of hedonistically rich Merlot wines at their very best. It also plays a key supporting role in filling out the middle palate of the Cabernet-dominated wines of the Médoc and Graves.

Merlot is now grown in virtually all wine growing countries and is particularly successful in California, Chile and Northern Italy.

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